City of Glendale will pony up $25 million again to keep Coyotes for another year

After the City of Glendale paid up their bill to the NHL earlier this week taking the hit for $25 million in operating losses last season, the city is prepared to go to the mat once again to buy more time to save the team from leaving Arizona.

The Glendale City Council is set to meet on Tuesday night and on the docket for discussion is a vote to see whether or not they will approve the same $25 million earmarked to pay the NHL for operating losses. According to Rebekah Sanders of The Arizona Republic, if the council votes to approve that money the team will stay in Arizona for yet another season.

NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly had this to say about the impending interim deal between the City of Glendale and the NHL to keep the team locked into Arena and the city once again.

“As we have for the past two-plus years, we have been working very closely with the City of Glendale to do everything possible to ensure the Coyotes’ future in Glendale,” NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly told “At the City’s request, we have agreed to pursue another one-year interim arrangement while we jointly pursue a long-term ownership solution. We remain confident that one exists, and we intend to continue to pursue it.”

That makes it all sound easy. The hard part, of course, is justifying a probable cost of $25 million being tossed down the drain once again. The money is ponied up with the expectation that the NHL will get a deal cut with Matthew Hulsizer and his group to sell the Coyotes to him and keep the team in Arizona for good.

After Hulsizer stepped up to be the man, the dealings have run cold and even led to rumors from Forbes today that he was having cold feet about the deal in Glendale and was turning his attention towards St. Louis to invest in. Inside sources have told PHT that those rumors are unfounded and that Hulsizer and his group are continuing to fight for the Coyotes and keep them in Glendale.

Making this situation all the stranger are some of the statements coming from members of the Glendale City Council. The Globe & Mail’s Eric Duhatschek heard from city councilor H. Philip Lieberman about what going ahead with this extra $25 million is all about for the City and his thoughts are curious given that there’s one big problem to all this yet to be squared away.

However, Lieberman noted that “we do not have a signed deal with Hulsizer -and there is some discussion as to whether we will ever get one or not get one. I don’t personally want to give him $110-million.

“In my mind, this (proposal) will give us a year to find somebody else who may be willing to buy it and come up with much more money. Real money – instead of city money.”

So let’s chalk all of this up here. The City of Glendale wants to take another $25 million hit to buy another year of negotiations with Hulsizer and fighting the Goldwater Institute to try and carve out a deal, meanwhile the team continues to lose money but the city won’t have a barren arena that they’re still paying off for having it built in the first place.

Got all that?

The situation is a mess and one that makes every part of this deal a gigantic mess. The City of Glendale opting to pony up another heaping amount of taxpayer money is the part that really makes me feel uncomfortable about everything, however. From the deal that Hulsizer is trying to work out with the city, one that’s being challenged vigilantly by the Goldwater Institute, in which the city wants to put up even more taxpayer money so Hulsizer catches a break not having to put up all of his own money to buy the team – nothing at all about this is neither normal nor seems right.

What’s most unfair about this is that it’s the fans stuck holding the bag here. More directly, it’s the citizens of Glendale that are taking the hit. It’s their tax money that’s going to pay for Arena and it’ll be even more of their money that goes to paying the NHL just to buy more time to negotiate a deal with Hulsizer that may see even more tax money put up as collateral so he can just purchase the team.

Nothing about any part of this deal feels right from a civic perspective. Asking a city to keep coughing up this much money to cover for a money pit of a bad original deal cut by the previous owners of the team comes off as a hostage situation. The City of Glendale suffers big time without the Coyotes, but the franchise and the city suffer with a team that continues to sit in limbo. David Ellman, Jerry Moyes, and the NHL have helped make this mess and now they’re doing anything in their power to fix it or cover it up. Here’s to hoping they don’t turn this situation into something out of The Simpsons when Lyle Lanley sold Springfield on the monorail.

Sens match season-high for goals, beat Dallas 7-4

Bobby Ryan, Antti Niemi
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DALLAS (AP) Jean-Gabriel Pageau scored two third-period goals and the Ottawa Senators held off the Dallas Stars for a 7-4 victory Tuesday night.

Ottawa was outshot 37-20 but scored three unassisted goals after takeaways, one on the power play and another short-handed, by Pageau.

Craig Anderson made 33 saves in his third straight win, including two shutouts. He had his scoreless streak snapped at 147:04, when Patrick Sharp scored in the second period.

Pageau scored on two breakaways, including his league-leading third short-handed, and added an assist. He has six goals this season.

Dallas goalies Antti Niemi and Kari Lehtonen combined to make only 13 saves.

The Senators’ Mike Hoffman also had two goals, one into an empty net. Mark Stone had a goal and two assists. Bobby Ryan and Milan Michalek also had goals.

NHL leader Jamie Benn scored his 15th and 16th goals for Dallas. Benn assisted on Tyler Seguin‘s goal.

The Senators are 4-0-2 in their last six games. Dallas’ loss ended the Stars’ five-game winning streak.

Ottawa didn’t have a shot on goal for the first 7:10, but its attempt went in for a 1-0 lead. Ryan took away the puck in the left faceoff circle, skated in front of Niemi and tucked the puck into the right corner.

Michalek scored at 18:49 of the first period for a 2-0 lead. Stone won a battle along the left-wing boards, and the puck went to Pageau. He passed to Michalek in the center of the left circle, and Michalek sent a wrist shot past Niemi into the upper right corner.

Sharp finally got to Anderson at 7:04 of the second. Cody Eakin tapped a pass ahead to Sharp, who sent a slap shot past the goalie.

The Senators regained a two-goal lead, when Stone intercepted a pass from the Stars’ Patrick Eaves at the blue line, stepped to the top of the slot and scored on a wrist shot at 12:33.

Lehtonen then replaced Niemi, who had allowed three goals in nine shots. The first shot Lehtonen faced was Hoffman’s goal from the top of the left circle on the power play.

Niemi re-entered the game at 1:05 of the third period, after Lehtonen made two saves. On the first shot Niemi faced, he allowed a short-handed breakaway goal by Pageau on a shot that trickled between the goalie’s legs.

Benn scored on a short-handed breakaway at 6:07. Just 1:57 later, Seguin scored from the right circle.

NOTES: Ryan has at least one point in nine straight games (4 goals, 7 assists, 11 points). … Anderson came into the game with two shutouts in a row after an overtime loss. … Dallas D Jason Demers (lower-body injury) was scratched from the lineup, but D Jordie Benn returned after missing Saturday’s game because of illness. … The Stars’ John Klingberg took the NHL lead with his 20th assist on Sharp’s goal. He and Ottawa’s Erik Karlsson, who assisted on Hoffman’s goal, are 1-2 in scoring among the league’s defensemen. . Dallas had won the previous seven games against the Senators.

Coyotes GM ‘called right away’ on Hamonic

Don Maloney
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You can add Arizona to the list of teams that tried to get in on the Travis Hamonic sweepstakes.

“[He’s] a talented player,” Coyotes GM Don Maloney said, per the Arizona Republic. “We certainly called right away, but we do not have a good fit for them right now.

“That’s the bottom line. They’re looking for a ready-made complement player.”

Hamonic, who requested a trade out of New York, is garnering plenty of interest across the league. TSN’s Darren Dreger reported five clubs — Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Colorado and Minnesota — were in the mix, with Sportsnet floating potential trade chips like the Jets’ Jacob Trouba, and the Flames’ T.J. Brodie.

It’s unsurprising the Coyotes didn’t have a fit for Isles GM Garth Snow.

It’s hard to imagine — nearly impossible, really — to think Oliver Ekman-Larsson would be on the move, and the rest of the Arizona defense is comprised of unheralded youngsters (Michael Stone, Connor Murphy) or grizzled vets (Nicklas Grossmann, Zbynek Michalek).

But Maloney’s remarks are still noteworthy, because he more we hear about the Hamonic situation, the clearer the asking price gets.

Related: Hamonic willing to finish season with Isles

Star struck: Sens chase Niemi after three goals on nine shots (Update: And now he’s back)

Milan Michalek, Antti Niemi
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Bet Antti Niemi misses playing Buffalo.

Niemi, who stopped 46 of 47 shots in back-to-back wins over the Sabres last week, was hooked during Tuesday’s game against the Senators after allowing three goals on nine shots.

In Niemi’s defense, tonight’s goals weren’t exactly his fault.

John Klingberg coughed up the puck badly on Bobby Ryan‘s opening tally…

And on Ottawa’s second goal, Jyrki Jokipakka lost a board battle moments before Milan Michalek snapped one home:

The Sens’ third marker also came on a turnover.

Update: Well, this is quite the night for Dallas netminders. Kari Lehtonen replaced Niemi, allowed a goal, then got hurt in this collision with Klingberg, which forced him from the game and Niemi back into action.

Foley aware of Seattle reports, but says Vegas is ‘proceeding as if we will play in 2017’

Gary Bettman, Bill Foley
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Bill Foley, the man behind Las Vegas’ prospective NHL expansion team, says he knows about reports claiming the league is keeping an eye on a proposed Seattle arena.

He also says he isn’t going to worry about things out of his control.

“I’m aware of what’s going on (in Seattle) but in my communication with the league, our situation isn’t dependent on third parties,” Foley said Tuesday, per the Las Vegas Review-Journal. “We believe we’re in good shape and we’re proceeding as if we will play in 2017.”

Over the weekend, a Seattle Times piece suggested the NHL had yet to award Vegas or Quebec City an expansion franchise because the league is “avoiding any expansion decision until after an upcoming Seattle City Council vote likely to decide the fate of Chris Han­sen’s proposed Sodo District arena.”

The piece also suggested Seattle could be granted an expansion club for the 2018-19 campaign.


That vote, on granting Hansen part of Occidental Avenue South for his arena, is expected by January. No one knows how it will go, only that the lead-up should be politically charged and fiercely contested.

But passing it — future legal appeals notwithstanding — paves the way for Hansen to obtain his Master Use Permit and have his arena “shovel ready” should he choose to build.

And that means, once a vote passes, it’s entirely possible the NHL could conditionally award Seattle an expansion team.

To his credit, Foley remains solely focused on his Vegas bid — not what potential rival bids could bring to the table. And while he confirmed he has yet to be invited to the Dec. 7 NHL Board of Governor’s meeting in Pebble Beach, he re-iterated his only objective is to strengthen Sin City’s case for a hockey team.

“I’m focused on trying to find a place to build our practice facility,” he said. “I’m focused on the new arena and our fans who’ve put down deposits on season tickets.”