Bruce Boudreau

Why the Washington Capitals should give Bruce Boudreau one more year

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Despite Bruce Boudreau’s objections, it’s not stupid to wonder if the Washington Capitals should change their head coach. After all, the fans are furious. The media is calling for his head. Everyone seems to know what’s best for the team and most think booting Bellicose Bruce is the correct way to go.

That doesn’t mean they are right, though.

If the Capitals want an example of the erroneous nature of following conventional wisdom and changing directions on a whim, all they need to do is to study the last decade of Washington Redskins football. Seemingly any time a coach faltered, he was fired. Quick-fix, no-brainer free agents came in and sputtered comically. It all seemed like a good idea on paper, but reality isn’t as simple as franchise mode in Madden.

So here’s my advice to Ted Leonsis and the Capitals: stop reading the papers. Ignore all of those angry, ALL CAPS comments. Make the wise but unpopular choice to give Boudreau one more year.

The team is structured for one more run.

Most importantly, make sure you give Boudreau one last real chance. If he freely chose to rein his team in, tell him to let the horses loose. Go back to the break-neck, devil-may-cry system that propelled this team to a runaway Presidents Trophy win in 2009-10.

People love to call that season a failure when it’s just as possible that it simply ended in bad luck. After all, the far-less-criticized Pittsburgh Penguins lost to that same turtle shelled, counter-attacking Montreal Canadiens team. In fact, that Penguins team absolutely flopped in their Game 7 loss while the Capitals left the Habs (and viewers) breathless in defeat.

Canning Boudreau might be the easiest thing to do, but the team cannot be properly rebuilt into a trap-happy defensive squad in one summer anyway. Honestly, the roster is just screaming for a last hurrah.

Mike Green, Alexander Semin, Dennis Wideman and Mike Knuble will be in the last year of their contracts in 2011-12. That’s about $17.88 million that could be redirected into the bank accounts of shutdown defensemen and two-way forwards if Boudreau’s free-wheeling system fails one last time.

The importance of self-awareness

People seem to believe that professional athletes can be radically re-programmed into drastically different players, but the most you can normally hope for is incremental improvement. Sure, every once in a while a Steve Yzerman or Mike Modano will sublimate their selfish offensive urges for the greater good, but those instances are rare. And let’s face it; those two players played alongside much better defensive teammates even as they adapted their games.

For the “Defense wins championships” crowd out there, you’re one-third right. Simply put, the right mixture of offense, defense and goaltending wins championships. There isn’t some magic potion or secret password that ranks as “the only way.”

Offense wins championships, too.

Offense-first mentalities worked just fine for Stanley Cup winners including: the ’90s (and maybe most recent) Pittsburgh Penguins, the Carolina Hurricanes and the Edmonton Oilers dynasty. Obviously those teams played some defense and enjoyed timely goaltending, but their firepower pushed them to win a championship (or five).

To tie it to other sports, the Capitals system was a lot like a fast break offense before this compromised season. Pundits easily forget that the Bob Cousy-era Boston Celtics became a dynasty thanks to their fast break system.

The difference was that they also had the right players to get the job done. (Most notably, Bill Russell’s rebounding was a crucial ingredient.)

Do the Capitals possess the right parts to make it work? Not yet, but maybe next season. Some might not be satisfied with “maybe” but if you ask me, they definitely don’t have the pieces to win on the strength of their defense.

Sometimes it takes a lot of courage to be who you really are, but that’s the best way for the Capitals to shoot for a Stanley Cup.

Ristolainen, still without a contract, makes ‘good will’ gesture towards Sabres

BUFFALO, NY - JANUARY 22: Rasmus Ristolainen #55 of the Buffalo Sabres makes a pass during the game against the Detroit Red Wings on January 22, 2016 at the First Niagara Center in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images)
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Rasmus Ristolainen doesn’t have a contract yet, and he’s not particularly close to getting one either.

But the Sabres defenseman, a restricted free agent, doesn’t want to burn any bridges, so he arrived at KeyBank Center on Thursday as a “good will” gesture, reports The Buffalo News. He’ll practice with his teammates, head coach Dan Bylsma confirmed.

“Everyone knows how dedicated he is to his training, and he wanted to continue to build on the gains he made this summer,” Ristolainen’s agent, Mike Liut, wrote in an email to the News. “In the end, this made sense to him, at least in the short term.”

The eighth overall pick in the 2013 draft, Ristolainen had nine goals and 32 assists in 82 games for the Sabres last season.

“I still trust that we will make that contract happen,” Ristolainen told reporters a couple of weeks ago at the World Cup in Toronto, where he was representing Finland. “I like Buffalo. I want to be there as long as I can and I feel they feel the same way about me. I trust it’s going to be taken care of.”

Related: Rieder’s agent thinks trade from Coyotes is best for both parties

Wild to play Coyle at RW, likely on top line with Parise and Staal

Minnesota Wild center Charlie Coyle, right, controls the puck against Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith during the first period of Game 1 in the second round of the NHL Stanley Cup hockey playoffs in Chicago, Friday, May 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
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It’s been the ongoing storyline over Charlie Coyle‘s four years in Minnesota — center, or wing?

This year, it’ll be the latter.

At least to start.

Head coach Bruce Boudreau confirmed Coyle will begin the year playing at right wing, potentially on the club’s top line next to Zach Parise and Eric Staal.

“I think I’m built more for that game,” Coyle said, per the Star-Tribune. “Long-term, I think they like me at center, I don’t know. It doesn’t matter to me, but it is nice to be able to consistently play one place and not go back and forth.

“Mentally, once you play one place, you feel more comfortable.”

Coyle has played center quite often, most notably during the ’14-15 campaign when he finished third on the team in faceoffs taken (behind Mikko Koivu and Mikael Granlund). And while it’s obvious he’d be able to impact the game more playing down the middle rather than outside, Coyle’s attributes on the wing are hard to pass up.

Specifically, his ability to find the back of the net.

Coyle scored a career-high 21 goals last year, many of them coming while playing RW. For a Wild team that isn’t all that dynamic offensively, such production is hard to pass up.

What’s more, the Wild do have options down the middle.

Staal and Koivu are there, as is Mikael Granlund. Erik Haula‘s proven to be a quality 3C or 4C, and Coyle could always flip back to center in a pinch.

Putting Coyle on the wing would also give Boudreau more balance among his forward group. Granlund — who, like Coyle, is also versatile enough to play wing — could move to the left side on the Koivu-Jason Zucker line, which would give Minnesota a nice third unite comprised of Haula, Nino Niederreiter and Jason Pominville.

Stecher makes memorable debut for Canucks, the team he grew up supporting

Vancouver Canucks' Alexander Edler, of Sweden; Joseph Labate; Alexis D'Aoust; James Sheppard; and Troy Stecher, from left, celebrate Labate's goal against the Edmonton Oilers during the second period of an NHL hockey preseason game Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, in Vancouver, British Columbia. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP)
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Troy Stecher admitted he was “still shaking” when he met with reporters following last night’s preseason game in Vancouver. The 22-year-old rookie defenseman had just scored one goal and added two impressive assists in the Canucks’ 5-3 win over the Oilers.

Not bad for an undrafted, local kid who grew up a fan of the team.

“Something I’ll never forget, obviously,” Stecher said. “First game at Rogers (Arena). I grew up watching the Canucks, coming here. It was a different feeling being on the other side of it.”

It was only one game, but for the second year in a row, a defenseman who just finished his college career appears to be pushing for a spot on the Canucks. Last year, it was Ben Hutton, out of Maine, and he made it.

So, could Stecher, out of North Dakota, actually crack the Canucks’ roster as a right-shot, offensive defenseman?

Well, he’s already beaten out Jordan Subban, who’s been returned to the AHL. His main, remaining competition figures to be North America returnee Philip Larsen, who’s been in the KHL the past couple of seasons.

The answer has to be yes.

But again, it’s only been one game. He’s earned another one, according to head coach Willie Desjardins, so he’ll have to build on his first one.

“I’m a young guy, so confidence is huge,” said Stecher. “I think I played pretty well. If I have a poor game, then you kind of dwell on it all day tomorrow and it’s in your mind. At the same time, I’ve just got to put it in my back pocket. Tomorrow’s a new day and I’ve got to come to the rink prepared to work hard and just continue to do my thing.”

Related: Prized North Dakota d-man Stecher goes pro, signs with Canucks

Report: Lindholm seeking eight-year deal from Ducks, at least $6M per

LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 04:  Hampus Lindholm #47 of the Anaheim Ducks reacts to his power play goal with Kevin Bieksa #2 to take a 4-1 lead over the Los Angeles Kings during the second period at Staples Center on February 4, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Details are starting to come out about the contractual impasse between Anaheim and prized young defenseman Hampus Lindholm.

Fresh off an appearance with Team Sweden at the World Cup, Lindholm — a still-unsigned RFA — is reportedly seeking “more than $6 million per season over eight years,” according to the O.C. Register.

The 22-year-old is currently in Sweden training with SHL club Rogle BK, the team he played for prior to getting drafted sixth overall in 2012.

Lindholm is coming off his three-year, entry-level deal, one that carried a cap hit of $894,166.

The Ducks are in a bit of a financial squeeze and also need to sort out another RFA — versatile forward Rickard Rakell — so it’s understandable why negotiations with Lindholm have been drawn out.

That said, they’re not going to want to drag feet much longer.

Lindholm is a budding star on defense, coming off a year in which he scored a career-best 10 goals and 28 points in 80 games, averaging 22 minutes per night. He was also a huge part of Anaheim’s run to Game 7 of the Western Conference Final the previous spring, scoring 10 points in 16 games while increasing his ice time to 23:15.

According to the Register, the “feeling” is that Anaheim’s closer to a deal with Rakell than Lindholm. And on that note, it’s worth mentioning the Ducks make their season debut in two weeks — on Oct. 13, with a road date in Dallas.