Vancouver is struggling to maintain leads, but it’s not Roberto Luongo’s fault

Don’t blame the Vancouver Canucks for feeling good about themselves right now, although obviously they shouldn’t get too comfortable. Not after nearly coughing up a 3-0 series lead against the Chicago Blackhawks in the first round.

Warm-and-fuzzies aside, there are a few clouds in their sky.

Moving past the slightly worrisome play of the Sedin twins, the biggest concern could be the Canucks’ struggles holding onto leads. The Globe & Mail points out that the Canucks lead the NHL’s regular season with 100 third period goals, but lately, they’ve been far too happy to go in cruise control with leads. Vancouver Canucks blogger Alix Wright probably described it best on Twitter when she said, “The Canucks are AlainVigneaulting again.”

Rather than maintaining a high pace, high-pressure attack as a more offensively talented and dynamic team than the Nashville Predators, the Canucks elect to go into turtle mode and often find themselves in some nail-biters (including an overtime loss in Game 2).

The Globe & Mail seems to put most of the blame at the feet/pads of Roberto Luongo.

Twice this week against the Nashville Predators the Canucks let third-period leads slip away – both tying goals absolute groaners – and had to settle matters in overtime, losing once and winning once.

It happened again Thursday night when, up 2-1 heading into the third, yet another groaner – even if somewhat less egregious than the previous two – found its way between Roberto Luongo’s pads to tie a game in the final frame.

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The victory was gratifying, as Vancouver has been by far the better team, but the late goal simply raised, once again, that old bugaboo concerning Luongo – can he win the games that truly matter?

It is the albatross around his neck, the gorilla on his back, the animal inside his head. It is a cruel knock that he has never been allowed to shed – not even with a gold-medal victory in last year’s Olympics, when Sidney Crosby’s goal allowed the thousands of Luongo doubters to take their first breath since the puck dropped in overtime.

Luongo had his rough moments in the Chicago series, but he bounced back masterfully in Game 7 and has been an elite performer since then.

In the last five games – three of which went into overtime – Luongo earned one shutout, allowed just one goal twice and never yielded more than two in any single contest. Overall, he let seven goals past him in that five-game span, making 142 out of 149 saves in the process.

I’m not sure how much more media members and fans can ask from him. Should he start scoring goals on a line with the Sedin twins? Maybe cure a disease or invent a cheaper, more environmentally-friendly form of gasoline? Sure, there have been a few “groaners” but there isn’t a goalie in the world whose resume spotless.

It’s also probably important to note that, you know, the Canucks are winning even if it isn’t always pretty. Those “blown” leads haven’t resulted in many losses, so Vancouver fans shouldn’t go into panic mode just yet.

If anything, the Canucks should make a self-assessment about how the team functions with lead as a a whole. Sometimes people refer to tallies that provide a two or three-goal lead as “insurance goals,” but the only premium one needs to pay is the risk of allowing a goal against.

Considering the fact that they’re allowing them anyway, maybe that’s an adjustment the team could make as they approach even bigger games.

Penguins’ Guentzel makes ‘kick save’ to stop Capitals

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It doesn’t get much better than a player making the type of save you’d only expect from a goalie. OK, how about this: when it happens amid the high stakes of the Stanley Cup Playoffs?

Pittsburgh Penguins forward Jake Guentzel had already been distinguishing himself with a red-hot scoring start to the postseason, but he made a big difference in a way that won’t show up in the box score (aside from maybe as a blocked shot) for Game 1 against the Washington Capitals.

In one of the few golden opportunities in a notably tight first period, Guentzel made a “kick save” to keep it 0-0. He also managed to avoid giving the Capitals a penalty shot in the process, so this was quite the effort from the impressive rookie.

Video will be added soon. Here’s the moment in GIF form first:

Lundqvist snubs Sens with 21 saves in first (Video)

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You know how goalies claim they prefer to be busy rather than risking rust in seldom seeing shots? If that’s true, Henrik Lundqvist was really, really happy in the first period.

The Ottawa Senators generated chance after chance in a busy opening frame of Game 1, generating a 21-12 shot differential against the New York Rangers. The game remains 0-0 in large part because Lundqvist has carried over his momentum from the Montreal Canadiens series so far.

As you can see from the video above, Lundqvist made some absolutely fantastic saves, especially in somehow stopping Mark Stone.

In a duller game, 21 shots on goal could a team’s entire output.

That’s impressive stuff from what appears to be a “vintage” Lundqvist. We’ll see how much more the Rangers lean on him as this one goes along.

Oh, and here’s a GIF of the best stop of the bunch, because seriously.

Kunitz is in for Penguins vs. Capitals in Game 1

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The Pittsburgh Penguins get a familiar face back in the lineup, as Chris Kunitz is good to go against the Washington Capitals in Game 1.

The 37-year-old has been sidelined since March 31, ending his regular season with just an assist in his final nine games. His last goal came on Feb. 16.

So, in other words … he’s not quite as big of a deal for this series as he had been in the past.

He’ll draw into a solid fourth line with Matt Cullen and Tom Kuhnackl, while Carter Rowney will be a healthy scratch. Check out the Penguins’ line combos heading into Thursday’s showdown:

Foligno, Getzlaf, Giordano vie for Messier Leadership Award

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The NHL announced the three finalists for the Mark Messier Leadership Award: Nick Foligno (Columbus Blue Jackets), Ryan Getzlaf (Anaheim Ducks) and Mark Giordano (Calgary Flames).

In case you’re curious about the process, the league explains how it works (and how the buck stops with Messier):

Mark Messier solicits suggestions from club and League personnel as well as NHL fans to compile a list of potential candidates for the award. However, the selection of the three finalists and ultimate winner is Messier’s alone. 

So, yes, it might come down to steeliness/60.

Anyway, the most fun part of this award is that Getzlaf and Giordano just engaged in a first-round series, with Getzlaf’s hit on Giordano (see above) being one of the standout moments.

Perhaps Giordano will at least get the best of Getzlaf in this one?