Roberto Luongo

Vancouver is struggling to maintain leads, but it’s not Roberto Luongo’s fault

Don’t blame the Vancouver Canucks for feeling good about themselves right now, although obviously they shouldn’t get too comfortable. Not after nearly coughing up a 3-0 series lead against the Chicago Blackhawks in the first round.

Warm-and-fuzzies aside, there are a few clouds in their sky.

Moving past the slightly worrisome play of the Sedin twins, the biggest concern could be the Canucks’ struggles holding onto leads. The Globe & Mail points out that the Canucks lead the NHL’s regular season with 100 third period goals, but lately, they’ve been far too happy to go in cruise control with leads. Vancouver Canucks blogger Alix Wright probably described it best on Twitter when she said, “The Canucks are AlainVigneaulting again.”

Rather than maintaining a high pace, high-pressure attack as a more offensively talented and dynamic team than the Nashville Predators, the Canucks elect to go into turtle mode and often find themselves in some nail-biters (including an overtime loss in Game 2).

The Globe & Mail seems to put most of the blame at the feet/pads of Roberto Luongo.

Twice this week against the Nashville Predators the Canucks let third-period leads slip away – both tying goals absolute groaners – and had to settle matters in overtime, losing once and winning once.

It happened again Thursday night when, up 2-1 heading into the third, yet another groaner – even if somewhat less egregious than the previous two – found its way between Roberto Luongo’s pads to tie a game in the final frame.


The victory was gratifying, as Vancouver has been by far the better team, but the late goal simply raised, once again, that old bugaboo concerning Luongo – can he win the games that truly matter?

It is the albatross around his neck, the gorilla on his back, the animal inside his head. It is a cruel knock that he has never been allowed to shed – not even with a gold-medal victory in last year’s Olympics, when Sidney Crosby’s goal allowed the thousands of Luongo doubters to take their first breath since the puck dropped in overtime.

Luongo had his rough moments in the Chicago series, but he bounced back masterfully in Game 7 and has been an elite performer since then.

In the last five games – three of which went into overtime – Luongo earned one shutout, allowed just one goal twice and never yielded more than two in any single contest. Overall, he let seven goals past him in that five-game span, making 142 out of 149 saves in the process.

I’m not sure how much more media members and fans can ask from him. Should he start scoring goals on a line with the Sedin twins? Maybe cure a disease or invent a cheaper, more environmentally-friendly form of gasoline? Sure, there have been a few “groaners” but there isn’t a goalie in the world whose resume spotless.

It’s also probably important to note that, you know, the Canucks are winning even if it isn’t always pretty. Those “blown” leads haven’t resulted in many losses, so Vancouver fans shouldn’t go into panic mode just yet.

If anything, the Canucks should make a self-assessment about how the team functions with lead as a a whole. Sometimes people refer to tallies that provide a two or three-goal lead as “insurance goals,” but the only premium one needs to pay is the risk of allowing a goal against.

Considering the fact that they’re allowing them anyway, maybe that’s an adjustment the team could make as they approach even bigger games.

Video: Flyers’ Konecny scores first NHL goal

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Through six games of the NHL season, Travis Konecny enjoyed a nice start to his rookie campaign with five assists. Just one thing was missing, though.

On Tuesday, he took care of that against the Buffalo Sabres.

Konecny, taken 24th overall in the 2015 NHL Draft, deflected an Ivan Provorov point shot early in the third period, beating goalie Anders Nilsson on the glove side for his first NHL goal.  That goal also got the Flyers on the board.


Konecny and Provorov make Flyers, expected ‘to be here all year’

WATCH LIVE: Ducks at Sharks

ANAHEIM, CA - DECEMBER 04:  Martin Jones #31 of the San Jose Sharks and Paul Martin #7 of the San Jose Sharks defend against the shot of Corey Perry #10 of the Anaheim Ducks during a game at Honda Center on December 4, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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California rivals clash tonight, as the Anaheim Ducks visit the San Jose Sharks. This marks the first meeting of the season between the two Pacific Division teams.

The Sharks have lost two games in a row, while the Ducks have won two straight.

You can catch tonight’s game on NBCSN or with the NBC Sports’ Live Extra (10 p.m. ET).


Here are some links to check out for tonight’s game:

Brent Burns is on a beastly pace

Report: Ducks put Despres on long-term injured reserve

NHL on NBCSN doubleheader: Sabres vs. Flyers; Ducks vs. Sharks

Video: Looks like Bishop lost some teeth after taking a shot to the mask

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Difficult night for some goalies across the NHL.

Frederik Andersen has had his struggles against Steven Stamkos and the Tampa Bay Lightning, although the players in front of him haven’t given their puck stopper much help, either.

And then there is Bolts goalie Ben Bishop, who took a Peter Holland wrist shot off the mask and appeared to lose some teeth as a result.

But this is hockey. Bishop, who even appeared to crack a smile while being examined on the ice, remained in the game.

Video: Sabres make Flyers pay after Giroux slams Girgensons from behind into the boards

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Claude Giroux was called for boarding after plastering Zemgus Girgensons from behind into the boards in the second period. But the Buffalo Sabres made the Philadelphia Flyers and their captain pay.

Giroux was assessed only a minor penalty on the play. He promptly exited the penalty box, though, after Matt Moulson scored six seconds into the Sabres power play, giving Buffalo a two-goal lead.

Girgensons and Moulson scored less than two minutes apart to give Buffalo the lead.