Brendan Morrison, Miikka Kiprusoff, Mason Raymond

NHL’s crack down on ‘Green Men’ continues odd week for fans celebrating the Canucks


The NHL makes some strange decisions here and there, but usually those odd choices are focused on illogical suspension-related verdicts rather than limiting fans.

Every once and a while, the league chooses to play the role of fun-killers, though. It seems like it’s been a rough few days for fans who express their love of the Vancouver Canucks, in particular. First The Canadian Press reported that the NHL forced a Vancouver-area car dealership to remove a “Go Canucks Go” sign for copyright-related reasons. Local radio station Rock 101 was running a promotion in which fans could use a sledgehammer to bash a car with a Chicago Blackhawks or Nashville Predators logo until the league intervened for the similar copyright infringement-related decisions.

Now the league is taking perhaps its boldest step yet by trying to crack down on the infamous “Green Men” who ludicrously heckle opposing team players who end up in the penalty box. (You can read an interview PHT conducted with those two fans in this post from 2010.) If you’ve watched any Canucks games that took place at Rogers Arena in Vancouver in the last couple years, it’s almost inevitable that you would come across those Green Men. After all, it’s pretty hard to miss two guys in full-body neon suits who do hand stands and other attention-grabbing things to try to get under the other team’s skin.

It’s an amusing act, even if it’s not particularly original considering the fact that the tradition began in the television show “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and copycats keep cropping up at all sorts of events.

Still, it’s one of those things that underscores the passion (and off-beat sense of humor) of many Canucks fans. While the NHL isn’t kicking them out of their seats altogether, the league asked the two fans (they go by Sully and Force) not to touch the glass or do handstands after a complaint was filed about their antics. Naturally, a Facebook petition quickly cropped up in their defense.

All three of these examples of the league getting borderline litigious strike me as disappointing. Asking the car dealership to take down the sign seems unfair … does this mean that any local business must worry about praising their market’s team during the playoffs? If it was clear that the partisanship was driving the car dealership’s business, that would be one thing, but local businesses rooting for teams is a time-honored tradition. Limiting the radio promotion would have made perfect sense if it weren’t for the fact that the station was reportedly raising money for the Make-A-Wish foundation.

Finally, cracking down on the “Green Men” just seems like petty fun-killing since those fans are just part of the atmosphere. Asking them not to touch the glass is almost reasonable if it weren’t for the fact that many fans pound on the glass during games, but the real ridiculous part is telling them not to do handstands.

The NHL comes off as a bit of a bully in these cases, as it seems like they’re picking on their own bread-and-butter: fans expressing their love for their team in harmless ways. It would be understandable if these measures were taken to reduce violence between fans of opposing teams (like this horrible example from a Los Angeles Dodgers game), but the “Green Men” are only questionable in their taste.

The league is allowed to police its fans and enforce its copyrights as it sees fit, but maybe they should pick their battles a bit more wisely going forward.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.