Dan Bylsma, Barry Trotz, and Alain Vigneault named Jack Adams Trophy finalists; Who wins?

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The NHL’s coach of the year award, the Jack Adams Trophy, always figures to be a hotly contested award and this year’s group of finalists are no different. With three different and intriguing cases to be made between Pittsburgh’s Dan Bylsma, Nashville’s Barry Trotz, and Vancouver’s Alain Vigneault, figuring out who wins the hardware this time around doesn’t figure to be any easier. There will be some controversy, however, over who was left out of the mix.

Dan Bylsma’s work in Pittsburgh to lead the Penguins to the fourth seed and very nearly winning the Atlantic Division title while playing half the season without Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin shows that it’s not always about the star players in order to be successful in the NHL. While Bylsma was without his superstars and a host of other injuries that limited the Penguins ability to ice their ideal starting lineup, he altered his game plan and his means of attacking and defending against opponents. Many other coaches would’ve struggled to adapt without their stars but Bylsma persevered in the face of roster armageddon.

Barry Trotz should essentially be nominated for this award every year as he’s able to put together a playoff team from a roster filled mostly with guys unrecognizable to the common fan. This season he led the Predators to the fifth seed in the Western Conference and thanks to Pekka Rinne they’ve gone deeper into the season than the franchise has ever been before. Each year Trotz has a team that’s a pain to play against, plays tough and physical, and most of all wins games. At some point Trotz is going to win this award because he just does his job excellently every year. Could this year finally be the one?

Vancouver’s Alain Vigneault has an easy case to make for the Adams Trophy. He coached the Canucks to the league’s best record and the Presidents’ Trophy. With the array of talent on the Vancouver roster from the Sedin twins to Ryan Kesler to Roberto Luongo, it’s tough to lose games with those guys. Instead, Vigneault led the team to the most wins in a season in franchise history and the Canucks’ best chance at a Stanley Cup in their 40 years in the NHL. His case for the award is pretty self explanatory.

The surprises lie in who didn’t make the cut as a finalist for the award. Tampa Bay’s Guy Boucher stands out as a snub and frankly we’re stunned as well. The expectations heading into this season for the Lightning were not very high and Boucher led them to the fifth seed in the Eastern Conference and had the Lightning on top of the Southeast Division for a good part of the season. While the three finalists all have great cases to be made to win the award, Boucher being left on the outside of the mix is stunning. Perhaps this was the voters way of rookie hazing. Other guys who could’ve deserved a look at the award as well are Rangers coach John Tortorella and Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau for his means of adapting philosophies and making the Capitals a tougher team to deal with.

As it stands, there are three very worthy coaches up for the award, but who wins? Let us know in our poll who you think is most deserving.

Kucherov, Stamkos and the Bolts are lighting it up

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The Tampa Bay Lightning are off to quite a start in the Eastern Conference, and Steven Stamkos and Nikita Kucherov are at the middle of it.

It shouldn’t come as any surprise that on Monday, the linemates received recognition from the NHL for their efforts, with Kucherov being named the NHL’s second star for last week and Stamkos the first star.

(By the way, remember that column about tempering expectations on Stamkos early in the season? Yeah, about that . . .)

Last week, Kucherov had to endure a brutal one-game scoring slump but did manage to capture five goals and eight points in four games, and is battling with Alex Ovechkin for the league lead in goals with 10. Stamkos, who has most recently had to battle back from knee surgery last season, had 11 points in four games, capped off with a four-point performance and a career milestone against the defending champion Pittsburgh Penguins on Saturday.

“You can’t overlook the fact that 600 points — that’s a lot of points in this league,” said coach Jon Cooper on Monday. “He’s just shy of 600 games right? So, to play that many games and be above a point-per-game player … it’s one thing to do that in 10 games but to do it in 600 games is pretty impressive.”

The Bolts and Toronto Maple Leafs continue to duke it out for not only the highest scoring team in the league right now, but also top spot in the Atlantic Division. The Lightning currently have a three-point lead.

While Kucherov and Stamkos have been a big part of Tampa Bay’s hot start, this club has received healthy contributions throughout their lineup. Their linemate Vladislav Namestnikov has gone about his business with 10 points, which has him tied in that category with Brayden Point.

Defenseman Mikhail Sergachev, who is still 19 years old and eligible to return to junior, is on the verge of playing his 10th game, but he’s currently Tampa Bay’s most productive blue liner (eight points in nine games), which makes it virtually a guarantee that he’ll remain in the NHL beyond that mark, using up the first year of his entry-level contract.

“There’s a really good chance you’ll see him tomorrow,” said Cooper of Sergachev.

Oh, and goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy has been impressive early on with a .933 save percentage through his eight starts.

Kucherov and Stamkos are obviously worthy of this recognition, and it’s probably not the last time they’ll receive such kudos from the league as this season continues. But the danger this team poses to the opposition goes beyond its stars.

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Cam Tucker is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @CamTucker_Sport.

Backup options limited for Penguins after waiving Antti Niemi

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Saturday’s 7-1 drubbing at the hands of the Tampa Bay Lightning was the last straw for the Pittsburgh Penguins and their need for Antti Niemi as a backup goaltender.

On Monday, the 34-year-old Niemi was waived as general manager Jim Rutherford continues his search to give starter Matt Murray some help in goal. In three starts this season, Niemi has allowed 16 goals on 63 shots and has posted an ugly .828 even strength save percentage. (The only goaltender with a lower ESSV%? His old crease mate Kari Lehtonen, who has an .815 in two appearances.)

While Niemi was dealt a bit of a tough hand in his three starts — all coming on the second night of a back-to-back — those numbers are just plain obscene and a clear sign that the Penguins needed to move on. It’s unsure what the plan is when he clears waivers on Tuesday. Will the team look to terminate the one-year, $700,000 deal he signed in the summer, or will they, as head coach Mike Sullivan mentioned, allow him to use the AHL as a place to find his game?

“That would be a great option, to give him an opportunity to get in some ideal circumstances and give him an opportunity to build his confidence in an environment that’s not as high stakes as the one we’re in here,” Sullivan said on Monday.

When Rutherford signed Niemi in the summer, he said the plan was to give him between 30 and 40 games this season, allowing Murray to not be overworked before the Stanley Cup Playoffs and give Tristan Jarry or Casey DeSmith continued development at their AHL affiliate in Wilkes-Barre.

The short-term option here is calling up one of the two kids, but if Niemi clears and they want to rehabilitate him, that’s time taken away from giving Jarry or DeSmith much-needed minutes. DeSmith has shined in three starts this year, winning all three games and only allowing three goals in 184:14 minutes played. It’s not ideal, but unless Rutherford can swing another deal to fill another void in the lineup — like he did on Saturday to get Riley Sheahan as the team’s new No. 3 center — the search could take a while.

The free agent market isn’t flowing with options and teams like Arizona, Boston and Vegas having goaltending issues, it won’t be easy to find someone.

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Sean Leahy is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @Sean_Leahy.

‘We need more’ — Struggling Habs demote slumping Galchenyuk

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The Montreal Canadiens, as an entire team, have been mired in a brutal scoring slump to begin the season.

The result has been a seven-game losing streak that, believe it or not, took an even uglier turn last week when the Habs were swept in embarrassing fashion on a three-game trip through California.

Among the players continuing to have difficulties producing is Alex Galchenyuk, who has one goal in eight games, produced one shot on goal in more than 18 minutes versus the Anaheim Ducks last week and only 14 shots on the season, and practiced on the fourth line with Michael McCarron and Nikita Scherbak ahead of tomorrow’s home game with the Florida Panthers.

This isn’t the first time this season that head coach Claude Julien has skated Galchenyuk on the fourth line. He offered a rather simple explanation on Monday, after situating a 30-goal scorer from only two years ago — and a player signed to a three-year, $14.7 million contract extension this summer — now situated in the bottom six of a lineup that is dead last in the league in scoring.

“Right now, I don’t think Alex has given us enough to … continue playing on our top line for the time being,” said Julien. “We certainly need more. At the same time, hopefully those guys I put him with are going to make him work and hopefully get better. At one point you’ve got to do something as a coach to get players that maybe deserve to be up, such as (Paul Byron) — he needs to be up there because he’s playing well, he’s scoring goals. You reward people that deserve it and at the same time, other guys have got to give you more.”

The aforementioned Byron, who skated Monday on the top line, Jonathan Drouin and Brendan Gallagher are currently tied for the team lead in goals — with two each. That’s through eight games. Yes, it’s bad. Max Pacioretty, a five-time 30-goal scorer, has just one so far, and he’s been candid about his complete lack of production so far.

“That is the challenge … how am I going to go tell my teammates that we got to be better when I’m the worst one on the ice,” he said last week, per Sportsnet.

There are individual players, specifically Alex Ovechkin and Nikita Kucherov each with 10, who have scored almost as many goals as the Habs as an entire team.  And after such a disastrous start, the heat is now on general manager Marc Bergevin for some of his moves in recent years, and for him to try to turn it around by perhaps pulling off a trade to upgrade their offensive attack.

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Cam Tucker is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @CamTucker_Sport.

Flames place Jagr on injured reserve

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The seemingly ageless Jaromir Jagr has been placed on injured reserve, after he left Saturday’s game versus the Minnesota Wild with what the club called a lower-body injury.

After going the entire summer without inking a contract before eventually signing a one-year, $2 million deal with the Flames earlier this month, the 45-year-old Jagr has appeared in five games with Calgary, and had points in back-to-back games before the injury occurred in the first period versus the Wild.

In a corresponding transaction, the Flames have recalled 23-year-old center Mark Jankowski from the American Hockey League.

Selected 21st overall by the Flames in the 2012 NHL Draft, Jankowski has turned into a promising prospect following a four-year college career and turning pro. Last season, the towering 6-foot-4 tall middle man compiled 27 goals and 56 points in 64 games with the AHL’s Stockton Heat and was in the running to potentially land a roster spot with the Flames after an impressive showing during training camp.

Read more: Looking to make the leap — Mark Jankowski

“For me, personally, I want to get called up based on my merit — I don’t want to just be an injury replacement guy,” Jankowski told the Calgary Herald. “I want to be someone who forced management’s hand, saying, ‘he needs to be here because we think he can help us win.’ That’s my mindset.”

Since going down to the AHL at the conclusion of camp, Jankowski has continued his productive ways with five goals and eight points in six games. Based on reports from Monday’s practice, Jankowski will remain at center with the Flames, which will move Sam Bennett over to the wing.

Following a playoff berth last spring and an active offseason, including the deal to land Jagr to play right wing, the Flames were expected to perhaps take another step toward competing for the Western Conference this season. It’s still early, however, through eight games, they sit with a 4-4 record, which includes losses in three of their last four games.

Their schedule doesn’t get any easier to close out the month. They’re on the road this week for two games on back-to-back nights in Nashville and then St. Louis, before they return home to face Dallas and Washington.

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Cam Tucker is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @CamTucker_Sport.