Mark Letestu, Brooks Orpik, Ben Lovejoy, Paul Martin, Tyler Kennedy

What Went Wrong: Pittsburgh Penguins

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Of all the first round exits, the Penguins might have the most easily diagnosed reason why they’re bowing out of the playoffs early. When looking over their numbers after being taken out in seven games, while one reason why they’re toast is obvious there are others lurking below the surface that help explain their early entrance to the offseason.

If you think everything centers around not having Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin around, you’re missing the mark. What went wrong for the Penguins? Let us count the ways.

1. Powerless power play
Let’s just get this out of the way first. The Penguins power play was abysmal. While the Bruins’ power play in these playoffs was technically worse since they didn’t score any goals in 21 chances, the Penguins power play may have cost them the series. Scoring at a 2.2% clip and going 1-35 in the series is awful. They had no cohesion, no real flow, nothing creative going on at all. They stunk.

In a series that demanded teams to find a way to score goals, the Pens had ample opportunity to put pucks in the net through the series (58:51 to be exact) and potted just one goal. That’s not getting it done for any team. When you’ve gotten nearly a full game’s worth of power play time over a seven game series you have to score more. We know all about how they didn’t have Crosby and Malkin and that’s fine, but adjustments have to be made especially since they spent half the season without those two. Give credit to Tampa Bay’s penalty kill for being tough, but at some point you’d think the law of averages had to give in and it never did.

2. Matt Cooke was sorely missed
Crazy thought right? Not so much when you consider how important Cooke was to the Pens penalty kill this season. For all of Cooke’s bad parts to his game, he’s a tremendous penalty killer for them. With Cooke out for the series thanks to his suspension, the Lightning were able to make a nice living on the power play going 8-27 in the series (29.6%). Half of those goals came in Game 5 that saw Tampa Bay win 8-2, but the point was hammered home that if Pittsburgh took penalties they were instantly playing with fire.

While the Pens would run the risk of giving up a few more power play opportunities with Cooke running around and doing his thing on the ice, his role on the PK was vital for them. Without him there the Lightning ran wild. With such a special teams advantage for Tampa Bay on both sides of the ledger, they were able to eke things out.

3. Offensive frustration personified
The Pens offense averaged two goals per game. That’s asking a lot out of Marc-Andre Fleury to be flawless. The Pens offense, instead, managed to not even be able to hit the net. Pittsburgh was second in the playoffs in missed shots with 108. Making matters tougher on them, the Lightning blocked a playoff best 145 shots. With guys either getting in their way or the Penguins missing the net entirely, it’s not shocking they had such a hard time scoring. When the shots did get through, Dwayne Roloson was there waiting to stop them. The Penguins led all teams in the playoffs through the first round with 257 shots on goal.

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We all know what the Penguins were missing in the playoffs this year. They were without two of the premiere offensive weapons in the NHL and they were also without their best penalty killer. Provided all things go well next season, they’ll have all of them back as they challenge for the Stanley Cup once again.

Dan Bylsma proved himself to be one of the best coaches in the NHL after juggling knives the way he did this season with injuries. The series loss stings, but if Crosby and Malkin needed further motivation to bounce back in a huge way next season, they’ve got it now.

Being named Oilers captain would be ‘one of the greatest honours,’ says McDavid

Connor McDavid
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It began gaining momentum well before Connor McDavid even finished his rookie season, the prospect that the young phenom had what it takes to become captain of the Edmonton Oilers.

Wayne Gretzky had his say, in an interview with the National Post last season.

“I have a great deal of respect for him. In my point of view, I think he’s mature enough that he can handle it at any age,” said The Great One, the Oilers captain when that franchise was a dynasty in the 1980s.

McDavid’s highly anticipated rookie season was interrupted with a shoulder injury, but he returned to play in 45 games, with 48 points. He was named a finalist for the Calder Trophy, and there was plenty of healthy debate for his case to be the top freshman in the league.

As his season continued and then ended, the talk of McDavid’s possible captaincy in Edmonton has persisted. The Oilers, who traded Taylor Hall last month, didn’t have a captain this past season.

From Sportsnet’s Mark Spector, in April:

Connor McDavid will be named as the Oilers’ captain at the age of 19 next fall, one of the items that was deduced at general manager Peter Chiarelli’s season-ending press briefing Sunday. Asked if his team would have a captain next season where this year it did not, the GM responded quickly: “I would think so, that we would have a captain next year.”

At 19 years and 286 days, Avalanche forward Gabriel Landeskog became the youngest player in NHL history to be named a captain.

McDavid, the first overall pick in 2015, doesn’t turn 20 years old until Jan. 13 of next year.

He’s already the face of the Oilers and perhaps soon, the NHL, too. He certainly doesn’t seem to shy away from the potential of one day being named the Oilers captain.

“Obviously. If I was ever the captain at any point I think it would be one of the greatest honours and one of the accomplishments that I would definitely take the most seriously,” McDavid told the Toronto Sun.

“I don’t want to comment on it too much, but obviously it would be an unbelievable feeling.”

Trevor Daley surprises young hockey players, firefighters with Stanley Cup visit

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Trevor Daley had his day with the Stanley Cup on Saturday, taking it through Toronto, surprising young hockey players at a local rink and firefighters at a local station.

He also held a private viewing party for family and friends inside a local bar, as per the Toronto Sun.

Daley’s post-season came to an end in the Eastern Conference Final when he suffered a broken ankle. His absence tested the depth of the Penguins blue line as the playoffs pressed on, but Pittsburgh was ultimately able to power its way to a championship.

When Sidney Crosby handed off the Stanley Cup, the first player it went to was Daley, whose mother was battling cancer.

“He had been through some different playoffs, but getting hurt at the time he did, knowing how important it was, he had told me that he went [to see] his mom in between series and stuff, she wasn’t doing well, she wanted to see him with the Cup,” said Crosby, as per Sportsnet.

“That was important to her. I think that kind of stuck with me after he told me that. We were motivated to get it for him, even though he had to watch.”

Daley’s mother passed away just over a week later.

Ben Bishop shows off his new Team USA World Cup mask

TAMPA, FL - JUNE 06: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on against the Chicago Blackhawks during Game Two of the 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Amalie Arena on June 6, 2015 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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Ben Bishop enjoyed plenty of success during the 2015-16 season and it didn’t go unnoticed. That’s why the veteran was selected to be part of Team USA for this fall’s World Cup of Hockey.

Team USA is loaded in goal, as they’ll be bringing Bishop, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and New Jersey’s Cory Schneider. It’ll be interesting to see how the coaching staff approaches this situation heading into the tournament.

Even if Bishop doesn’t start every game for Team USA, he can still say he has a pretty cool goalie mask for the occasion.

On Saturday, Bishop took to Twitter to show off his new piece of equipment:

That’s a pretty sweet mask!

With arbitration hearing looming, Corrado and Leafs aren’t that far apart

TORONTO, ON - MARCH 5:  Frank Corrado #20 of the Toronto Maple Leafs waits for a puck drop against the Ottawa Senators during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on March 5,2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Senators defeated the Maple Leafs 3-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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Frank Corrado should be used to waiting by now. He had to wait 28 games before the Leafs inserted him into the lineup for the first time last season and now he’s waiting for a new contract.

There’s still a gap between the two sides, but it doesn’t appear to be very significant. Corrado and the Leafs will head to arbitration on July 26th unless the two sides can agree to a new deal before then.

According to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, The Leafs have two different offers on the table. One is a two-way contract, while the other is a one-way deal that would see him make less money if he sticks in the NHL. Corrado is looking for a one-way deal worth $900,000.

Toronto scooped Corrado up off waivers from the Canucks prior to the start of the 2015-16 season. Despite waiting a while to actually hit the ice as a Leaf, Corrado finished the season with one goal, six points and a minus-12 rating in 39 games. He averaged 14:27 of ice time.

Splitting the difference would result in Corrado making roughly $737,500 next season.

The Maple Leafs are also scheduled to go to arbitration with forward Peter Holland (July 25) and defeseman Martin Marincin (Aug. 2).