Corey Crawford

What Went Wrong: Chicago Blackhawks


It’s tough to say that a lot went wrong for the Blackhawks as the eighth seed taking the top seeded Canucks to seven games and losing in overtime. After all, they backed into the playoffs on the last day of the season and didn’t have much expected of them and still nearly pulled off what would’ve been one of the most stunning upsets of all time.

So just what went wrong for Chicago? There’s a few nit picks to be had here.

1. You just can’t go down 0-3 in a series
It seems like pretty standard logic that the key to winning a best of seven series would be to not go down 3-0 in the series and put yourself on the brink of losing the rest of the way. Chicago getting shutout in Game 1 and then giving Vancouver fits in Games 2 and 3 were signs that things would turn around, but it’s hard to expect that any team can just up and lose four in a row in the playoffs like that (sorry Boston fans). Yes, Chicago played outstanding for the latter part of the series, but coming away short to start put their backs against the wall immediately. It’s tough to ask any team, defending champs or not, to fight back out of a hole like that.

2. Anyone seen the captain?
Jonathan Toews is without a doubt the top guy on the Blackhawks roster. He’s the team captain, he’s the unquestionable leader in the locker room. He also saved his only goal of the series for the right moment in tying the game late in the third period of Game 7. Toews had just one goal and three assists in the seven game series and while he deserves all the credit in the world for netting that shorthanded goal, he wasn’t getting it done the other six games. While Chicago got big performances from Duncan Keith and Dave Bolland, Toews was virtually invisible. For a captain that’s not good enough especially when his team needed that one extra jolt. Don’t expect Toews to take this lightly and he’ll be more focused and scarily motivated next year.

3. No defensive help
Duncan Keith played like a man possessed in this series. He led the team with four goals and two assists. As for the other Chicago defensemen… Well, they weren’t so good. The combination of Brian Campbell, Brent Seabrook, Chris Campoli, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Nick Leddy, and John Scott all combined for one goal and six assists. Six players with seven points ain’t helping out. While they had their hands full in trying to contain the Canucks offense on their own, they certainly weren’t giving the rest of the team a lift offensively. It’s almost fitting that Campoli’s misplay that led to Alex Burrows’ game winner in overtime is what did them in.


Chicago had a lot to deal with this year. From having so much roster turnover to figuring out that Corey Crawford was the man in goal to the run of the mill injuries throughout the year it was a bit much to ask of a defending champion to deal with. Still, Chicago’s got nothing to be sorry about.

Things broke right for them to get into the playoffs and they seized the day about as well as any team could from their position. And besides, if Nashville is able to stun Vancouver by making them look slow to the task, the Predators can give a “thank you” nod to Chicago for helping make life easier on them. They’ll be back again next year and likely even scarier.

Panarin impresses ‘Hawks with his preseason debut

Artemi Panarin
AP Photo
Leave a comment

Will Artem Panarin‘s overwhelming success in the KHL translate to North America? The 23-year-old forward has a lot to prove, but his first big test was a success.

Playing on a line with Patrick Kane and Artem Anisimov, Panarin made his preseason debut in Chicago’s finale on Saturday. He registered two assists while giving his teammates reason to be optimistic about him.

“For not being on the ice he looks really relaxed. He’s great with the puck, has nice moves and I think we’ll see a lot of this,” Marian Hossa told CSN Chicago. “He has unbelievable skill. People here in Chicago are going to have a good time watching this guy dangling.”

Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville was impressed by Panarin as well and liked that line as a whole.

The fact that the trio seemed to hit it off quickly has to come as a relief after an upper-body injury prevented Panarin from getting the most out of this year’s training camp. At the end of the day though, the fact that he was able to at least get in one preseason contest is a big silver lining. How smoothly his adjustment goes from here is still a big X-factor, but at least now he’s going into the regular season with a better idea of what to expect.

Panarin is attempting to establish himself in the NHL after leading the KHL’s SKA St. Petersburg to a championship last year. He was the team’s scoring leader, topping ex-NHL star Ilya Kovalchuk.

Gustavsson secures one-year contract with Bruins

Jonas Gustavsson
AP Photo
Leave a comment

There was stiff competition for the backup goaltending job in Boston, but with a signing this afternoon, it seems likely that the matter has been resolved.

The Boston Bruins announced that Jonas Gustavsson has agreed to a one-year, $700,000 deal. It’s a one-way contract, according to the Boston Globe’s Amalie Benjamin.

That contract is still small enough that the Bruins could bury it in the minors if they so desire, but it does set him apart from his last competitor for the goalie position, Jeremy Smith, who has a two-way deal. The fact that Boston went this route seems to imply that Gustavsson will serve as Tuukka Rask‘s understudy, although both netminders attended Sunday’s practice.

In Smith, the Bruins would be getting a 26-year-old goaltender who was dominant with the AHL’s Providence Bruins last season, but has no NHL experience. By contrast Gustavsson, 30, has played in almost 150 NHL games.

Boston sent Zane McIntyre and Malcolm Subban to the minors last week, but an argument could be made that either one of them is worthy of the backup job. However, both of them have a lot of potential and it’s not surprising that the Bruins felt they were better served by staying in the minors where they can play regularly and focus on honing their game.