Pittsburgh Penguins v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Six

Tampa Bay holds huge special teams advantage over Pittsburgh through 6 games

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There’s a lot of uncertainty in hockey. It’s a sport that can make the most sober diagnoses seem downright silly.

So every once in a while, it’s nice to know you’re not crazy. When I picked the Tampa Bay Lightning to beat the Pittsburgh Penguins (incorrectly in six games, by the way), the team’s highly productive power play was the justification. The Bolts scored 69 goals on the man advantage in 2010-11, second only to the Vancouver Canucks’ 72.*

* The Lightning wouldn’t rank highly on my power play plus/minus scale, though, since they allowed the most shorthanded goals in the league (16).

I wasn’t the only who noticed this distinction, but I’d wager that even the point’s loudest proponents didn’t expect such a stark contrast. Here’s a quick breakdown of the two teams’ power play efficiency through six games.

Tampa Bay’s power play

Overall: 8-for-25 (32 percent)

Shorthanded goals allowed: 0

Game 1: 0 for 1; Game 2: 2 for 6; Game 3: 2 for 4; Game 4: 0 for 4; Game 5: 4 for 7; Game 6: 0 for 3

A few thoughts: So they’ve scored power play goals in three of six games, but Game 5 was the real eyebrow-raiser. Four goals on the PP alone is pretty ridiculous.

Pittsburgh’s power play

Overall: 1-for-30 (3.3 percent)

Shorthanded goals allowed: 1, by Mattias Ohlund in Game 2.

Game 1: 0 for 6; Game 2: 0 for 7; Game 3: 0 for 2; Game 4: 1 for 3; Game 5: 0 for 7; Game 6: 0 for 5

A few thoughts: So the Penguins scored one measly PP goal, but it was in some ways neutralized by that Ohlund goal (in the big picture, since the goals happened in different games). The startling part is that they’ve received 30 opportunities, second only to the Philadelphia Flyers’ 31. Only the Boston Bruins have less PP goals (0, but just in 15 opportunities) and the defunct New York Rangers are the only other team with just 1 PP goal (although they had 20 opportunities instead of 30).

So, long story short, the Penguins have the worst power play in the 2011 playoffs. This clip of Chris Conner flubbing a penalty shot might be the perfect summary of their special teams struggles.

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In fact, you have to go back to the 2010 Washington Capitals – you know, the team that lost in the first round to the Montreal Canadiens – to find a power play that was less effective. The Caps only converted on 1 out of 33 opportunities in that series.

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Much like the 2010 Capitals, it’s amazing the Penguins have gotten this far with such a terrible power play. Sure, those numbers probably indicate a lack of offensive creativity (not a shocker in the absence of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin), but it also highlights just how scrappy this bunch can be. They’ve won three games thanks to good defense, solid goaltending and a few bounces here and there.

Can they win Game 7 that way? Will they fall victim to Tampa Bay’s superior special teams once more? Or will they flip the script in the final game? It should be interesting to find out on Wednesday.

Plenty of betting options for World Cup final round

BOSTON, MA - JUNE 24:  Patrice Bergeron #37 of the Boston Bruins checks Marian Hossa #81 of the Chicago Blackhawks in Game Six of the 2013 NHL Stanley Cup Final at TD Garden on June 24, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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Bovada released a wide array of betting options for the best-of-three final round of the World Cup between Canada and Team Europe on Monday.

Naturally, there are the run of the mill matters like game lines:

Europe vs. Canada (World Cup of Hockey Finals)

Europe +575 (23/4)

Canada -1000 (1/10)

Total Goals Europe vs. Canada (World Cup of Hockey Finals)

Over/Under 6

Interesting over/under, huh?

Things get more fun as the prop bets get stranger/more specific. Personally, the head-to-head player bets rank among the most fascinating:

Who will record more points in the game?

Sidney Crosby (CAN) 2/3

Anze Kopitar (EUR) 11/4

Draw 5/2

Who will record more points in the game?

Patrice Bergeron (CAN) 1/1

Draw 2/1

Marian Hossa (EUR) 9/4

Who will record more points in the game?

Brad Marchand (CAN) 4/5

Draw 9/5

Mats Zuccarello (EUR) 3/1

Hmm, maybe Marchand wouldn’t be the greatest bet. He’s probably feeling pretty fat and happy after signing that $49 million contract extension, after all.

At least one outlet finds Europe to be an enticing gamble thanks to Jaroslav Halak‘s hot play, for what it’s worth.

Jacob Trouba’s agent expands on trade request

UNIONDALE, NY - OCTOBER 28: Jacob Trouba #8 of the Winnipeg Jets skates against the New York Islanders at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on October 28, 2014 in Uniondale, New York.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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Jacob Trouba‘s agent Kurt Overhardt repeatedly shot down certain questions as “private” matters regarding a very public trade request from the Winnipeg Jets, yet his interview on TSN’s Hustler & Lawless spoke volumes about the impasse.

From the sound of things, it would be tough for the Jets to get Trouba to change course and sign a deal with the team.

Trouba seeks a spot as a top two defenseman, or at least one of a team’s top two options on the right side, something Overhardt firmly believes cannot happen in Winnipeg. He quickly deflected hypothetical scenarios regarding Dustin Byfuglien moving to the left or Tyler Myers getting bumped down the Jets’ depth chart.

“None of this is happening on a whim,” Overhardt said. ” … This has nothing to do with money.”

This excerpt from the Trouba press release hit a lot of the same points:

There has been no negotiation regarding the terms of a contract between our client and the Jets over the course of the last several months. The situation is not about money; it is solely about our client having the opportunity to realize his potential as a right shot NHL defenseman.

To the Jets credit, the club has two outstanding right shot veteran defensemen and our client simply wants the opportunity to have a greater role. As a consequence of the Jets depth on the right side, we believe it is in both parties’ best interest to facilitate a mutually advantageous trade.

You can read the team’s response in this post. Overhardt made it a point to mention that “several teams” would love to have Trouba’s rights, and would be able to give him the opportunity he craves.

Interestingly, he dodged a question about Trouba possibly sitting out the 2016-17 season, if it came down to it.

The full radio appearance is available here.

Lightning sign their other Nikita (Nesterov)

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY - APRIL 07:  Nikita Nesterov #89 of the Tampa Bay Lightning skates against the New Jersey Devils at Prudential Center on April 7, 2016 in Newark, New Jersey. Tampa Bay Lightning defeated the New Jersey Devils 4-2.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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The Tampa Bay Lightning signed their second-most important Nikita on Monday, inking Nikita Nesterov to a one-year, $725K contract.

The 23-year-old defenseman has to appreciate the fact that this is a one-way deal, as the Lightning blueline isn’t the easiest group to crack. (That will be especially true if James Wisniewski makes an impression with his PTO.)

Nesterov has been battling for ice time the past two seasons and was also a member of Russia’s World Cup team. It’s super-important to note that he wears No. 89, which is a little unusual for a defenseman.

(Only the important tidbits here.)

Now, onto the tougher challenge of signing that other Nikita

Senators focus on MacArthur’s safety

EDMONTON, AB - NOVEMBER 13: Clarke MacArthur #16 of the Ottawa Senators in action against the Edmonton Oilers during an NHL game at Rexall Place on November 13, 2014 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)
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The Ottawa Senators were already trying to take a relatively safe approach with Clarke MacArthur, yet he suffered a concussion thanks to a Patrick Sieloff hit during a scrimmage.

It’s too early to say that MacArthur will be forced to retire after this latest injury. At the moment, the Senators were merely happy to see him at the rink receiving treatment, as Guy Boucher told reporters.

“At this point in time, it’s not about Clarke MacArthur the hockey player. It’s about Clarke MacArthur the person,” Mark Borowiecki said, according to the Ottawa Citizen’s Ken Warren.

It’s a thought echoed by Senators GM Pierre Dorion shortly after the check, noting that they’re most focused on MacArthur as a “human being.”

Many wonder if Sieloff will face repercussions – perhaps even being released – for delivering such a hit during a scrimmage, especially after just being acquired.

So far, it sounds like he isn’t getting much heat, at least beyond the initial reaction of players getting physical with him right after the check. Boucher said “we’re not pointing fingers at the young kid right now,” according to Warren.

Here’s video of that hit, by way of Silver Seven Sens: