Joe Thornton

Five Thoughts: Relaxing on Jumbo Joe’s “choker” label and Canucks collective madness

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After a wild night that saw yet another series move on to a Game 7 and another series wrap up in dramatic fashion, we’re left with a lot to ponder and it’s good if your name is Joe Thornton and not so good if you’re a member of the Canucks or Penguins.

1. Look who decided to show up in a big spot, none other than Joe Thornton. For all the needling Thornton’s gotten for his lack of big play ability in the playoffs (97 games, 17 goals, 53 assists, 70 points) he shows up in overtime of an elimination game and puts away the Kings with the game winning goal.

For all the undue crap Thornton’s gotten in his career from his days in Boston on through to San Jose now (both fair for disappearing at times and unfair for playing through broken ribs), he gets the goal that moves the Sharks on to the next round where they’ll either be rewarded with a Predators team on fire or a Red Wings team that looks terrifying. Some reward. Still, Thornton’s play in this series made him one of the Sharks top producers (two goals, three assists). We’re not saying that Thornton’s reputation should be forgotten about or wiped clean, we’re just saying that maybe we should cut the guy a break.

2. It almost didn’t happen for Joe Thornton though as the Sharks had to kill off a five minute major at the end of regulation and to start in overtime after Jamie McGinn was sent off for charging Brad Richardson. At full speed and on first glance, the hit looked and sounded terrible. McGinn streaked in at Richardson from about 40-50 feet away and didn’t slow up at all in taking Richardson out. It’s as historically a dumb penalty as you’ll ever see but was it major worthy? After replays it certainly didn’t look that way and much of that is in part due to Richardson ducking his head out of the way at the last second.

That said, the ferocity of the hit, the speed of the play, and McGinn launching himself into Richardson all makes that initial call the right one even though hindsight says it was an overreaction. Officials don’t get that benefit though. The Sharks had the hockey gods on their side though as they killed off the penalty and won the game, but with everyone eager to condemn players for bad hits

3. As for people that might be due to eat a lot of criticism and for good reason, there’s Alain Vigneault, Mike Gillis and Roberto Luongo in Vancouver. Vigneault in announcing that Luongo would start Game 7 said that he told Luongo that he was starting the next game no matter what whether that was Game 7 or Game 1 of the second round. That’s awfully curious all things considered and it’s a bit of a peek at his confidence in Luongo. He’s either saying he felt that Cory Schneider would win Game 6 for them and Luongo was getting a quick vacation before the second round or that he was teaching him a lesson about sucking it up and dealing. Nice time of the year to do that. Luongo’s quotes in interviews yesterday sure made it seem like he wasn’t too eager to take the reins. Hoo boy.

As for Gillis, his tirade about how the officiating has been unfair all series (and Vancouver has been called for more penalties) is both a means for him to distract from the goaltending circus and a poorly timed effort to get the officials ears to call more in their favor. Good grief. If it works out, good for him. If not, the Canucks will have found a brand new way to embarrass themselves against Chicago.

4. Was it me or did Pittsburgh look awfully tired during Game 6 against Tampa Bay? Pittsburgh had good jump for about half the game but as time rolled along, the Lightning seemed to get stronger as the game moved along while the Penguins lost that ability to keep up. In Game 7 on Wednesday it’ll be a different setting and a desperate game for both teams, but given the way Tampa has looked in the last two wins, it’s not shaping up well for Pittsburgh. The Pens will need to play aggressive and on the edge of nasty the way Tampa did last night in defending home ice.

5. If Tampa Bay is to move on to the second round, the guy that will end up being the unsung hero for them after the first round is Ryan Malone. Malone, a former Penguin and Pittsburgh native, is playing with a certain edge and nastiness the rest of the Lightning team doesn’t necessarily have (aside from Steve Downie) and he’s relishing in the role of torturing and pestering his former teammates.

Whether he’s mixing it up after the whistle, committing questionable hits on Maxime Talbot, or shoving Penguins defensemen into Marc-Andre Fleury he’s gotten under their skin. Whether or not he has to hear from the NHL for his hit on Talbot remains to be seen, but we’re expecting he’ll not be suspended, especially for a Game 7. We’re sure that there’s nothing more that Malone would love to do than oust his former team.

Trevor Daley surprises young hockey players, firefighters with Stanley Cup visit

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Trevor Daley had his day with the Stanley Cup on Saturday, taking it through Toronto, surprising young hockey players at a local rink and firefighters at a local station.

He also held a private viewing party for family and friends inside a local bar, as per the Toronto Sun.

Daley’s post-season came to an end in the Eastern Conference Final when he suffered a broken ankle. His absence tested the depth of the Penguins blue line as the playoffs pressed on, but Pittsburgh was ultimately able to power its way to a championship.

When Sidney Crosby handed off the Stanley Cup, the first player it went to was Daley, whose mother was battling cancer.

“He had been through some different playoffs, but getting hurt at the time he did, knowing how important it was, he had told me that he went [to see] his mom in between series and stuff, she wasn’t doing well, she wanted to see him with the Cup,” said Crosby, as per Sportsnet.

“That was important to her. I think that kind of stuck with me after he told me that. We were motivated to get it for him, even though he had to watch.”

Daley’s mother passed away just over a week later.

Ben Bishop shows off his new Team USA World Cup mask

TAMPA, FL - JUNE 06: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on against the Chicago Blackhawks during Game Two of the 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Amalie Arena on June 6, 2015 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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Ben Bishop enjoyed plenty of success during the 2015-16 season and it didn’t go unnoticed. That’s why the veteran was selected to be part of Team USA for this fall’s World Cup of Hockey.

Team USA is loaded in goal, as they’ll be bringing Bishop, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and New Jersey’s Cory Schneider. It’ll be interesting to see how the coaching staff approaches this situation heading into the tournament.

Even if Bishop doesn’t start every game for Team USA, he can still say he has a pretty cool goalie mask for the occasion.

On Saturday, Bishop took to Twitter to show off his new piece of equipment:

That’s a pretty sweet mask!

With arbitration hearing looming, Corrado and Leafs aren’t that far apart

TORONTO, ON - MARCH 5:  Frank Corrado #20 of the Toronto Maple Leafs waits for a puck drop against the Ottawa Senators during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on March 5,2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Senators defeated the Maple Leafs 3-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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Frank Corrado should be used to waiting by now. He had to wait 28 games before the Leafs inserted him into the lineup for the first time last season and now he’s waiting for a new contract.

There’s still a gap between the two sides, but it doesn’t appear to be very significant. Corrado and the Leafs will head to arbitration on July 26th unless the two sides can agree to a new deal before then.

According to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, The Leafs have two different offers on the table. One is a two-way contract, while the other is a one-way deal that would see him make less money if he sticks in the NHL. Corrado is looking for a one-way deal worth $900,000.

Toronto scooped Corrado up off waivers from the Canucks prior to the start of the 2015-16 season. Despite waiting a while to actually hit the ice as a Leaf, Corrado finished the season with one goal, six points and a minus-12 rating in 39 games. He averaged 14:27 of ice time.

Splitting the difference would result in Corrado making roughly $737,500 next season.

The Maple Leafs are also scheduled to go to arbitration with forward Peter Holland (July 25) and defeseman Martin Marincin (Aug. 2).

Blues GM: We may take ‘half a step back,’ while young veterans grow into leadership roles

DALLAS, TX - MARCH 12:  Alex Pietrangelo #27 of the St. Louis Blues celebrates with Jaden Schwartz #17 of the St. Louis Blues, Dmitrij Jaskin #23 of the St. Louis Blues and Jori Lehtera #12 of the St. Louis Blues after scoring the game-winning goal against the Dallas Stars in overtime at American Airlines Center on March 12, 2016 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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After a few early exits from the Stanley Cup playoffs, the St. Louis Blues were finally able to make a long run. Granted, they didn’t win the Stanley Cup or make it to the final, but they did manage to reach the Western Conference Final.

Unfortunately for the Blues (and a lot of other teams), the NHL’s salary cap number didn’t increase very much and it forced the organization to part ways with a number of key veterans. Gone are captain David Backes, winger Troy Brouwer and goalie Brian Elliott.

There could be even more change between now and the start of the year, as Kevin Shattenkirk could find himself elsewhere.

Those key departures mean that the Blues will need some of their younger players to step up and take on more of a leadership role starting this fall. How will the team respond? Nobody knows, not even GM Doug Armstrong.

“It’s going to be an interesting case study on how quickly this group takes up the leadership,” Armstrong said, per the Boston Globe. “Can they do it in September? Or does it take them a year? There’s certainly a faith that over time, they’re going to pick it up without any issue. Obviously you want them to pick it up as quickly as possible. We don’t want to take any backwards movement in our organization. But sometimes you do expose yourself to maybe taking half a step back to take a couple steps forward.”

Young leaders like Vladimir Tarasenko, Jaden Schwartz and Alex Pietrangelo will need to “step up” in the leadership department, but the Blues aren’t completely out of veterans. Jay Bouwmeester, Paul Stastny and Alex Steen are all still on the roster. Still, it’ll be interesting to see if the Blues take that “half step back” that Armstrong was talking about.

Related:

Jake Allen still needs to prove he’s a ‘legit’ number one goalie

Blues sign Schwartz to five-year deal

Backes doesn’t want to ‘sling mud’ at Blues on his way out