Montreal Canadiens v Boston Bruins - Game Five

Bruins beat Canadiens 2-1 in 2nd OT after Tim Thomas and Carey Price engage in epic duel

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When people pictured how the Montreal Canadiens-Boston Bruins series would play out, this was the type of game people were expecting. Both Carey Price and Tim Thomas were flat-out amazing, with Thomas stealing the show even though two Bruins skaters made great “saves” of their own during the contest.

Even though it took until a second overtime period for Nathan Horton to bang in a rebound for a 2-1 Bruins win, each squad brought relentless energy to a game that was full of drama and close calls. The Habs shouldn’t feel shame with this loss, but this is the kind of defeat that’s tough to shake.

Boston 2, Montreal 1 (2nd OT); Bruins lead series 3-2.

This marks the second consecutive overtime win for the Bruins, who now have the Canadiens on the ropes after dropping behind 0-2. The Bruins also became the first team to win a home game in this series.

The greatest moments probably came from the most amazing saves.

After plenty of trips to the doghouse, Michael Ryder is putting together the type of postseason that could make him a folk hero in Boston. Ryder made an outrageous (but unofficial) save on a Tomas Plekanec shot, stopping the puck with his right hand with the type of reaction that makes him a great off-season ball hockey goalie.

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You would assume that would be the highlight of the game, but Ryder ended up with some great competition, with Zdeno Chara making a crucial “save” of his own (though it was a bit more accidental).

Judging from those two dodged bullets, one might wonder if Thomas had a bad night. Instead, he was at his aggressive, sprawling best while stopping 44 out of 45 shots. His best moment came in the the second overtime period when he stopped a well-executed 2-on-1 play in what was probably the best save of the playoffs so far.

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(Unless you prefer Ryder’s out-of-context stroke of brilliance, of course.)

Carey Price didn’t get the win, but anyone who blames him for the loss obviously didn’t watch the game (or even peruse the box score). Price made 49 out of 51 saves, including a brilliant stop when David Krejci tried a fancy one-on-one deke on him.

Here are all of the highlights:

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Thomas and Price put on a goalie clinic, but ultimately, the unorthodox goalie’s team came out on top against the polished butterfly stylist.

The three goal scorers

Brad Marchand made it 1-0 in the third period after the puck went his way from Patrice Bergeron’s broken stick, a goal that happened shortly after Max Pacioretty’s nose-related insults cropped up on Twitter. (Pacioretty later apologized.)

That 1-0 goal lead didn’t last, though, as Jeff Halpern took advantage of a Bruins lapse to bring the score to 1-1. It would stay that way until Horton scored off of a rebound nine minutes into the second OT. (If you’re like me, you’re expecting to come across a lot of Dr. Seuss puns in the near future.)

The impact on both teams

The Bruins must feel a lot of confidence with their backs against the wall. They’ve won three straight games with little-to-no margin of error, and again, two of those victories came in OT. After a relatively shaky start, Thomas is showing the world why he’s one of the absolute best netminders alive.

The Canadiens must be heartbroken right now, especially since they had a legitimate chance to win all five games. The silver lining is obvious, though: they’re obviously talented enough to trade blows with a strong team.

Montreal only needs to look to their 2010 series against the Penguins and Capitals for more dire situations, although this one might match those from an emotional standpoint.

This series is living up to its expectations so far, but if this amazing Game 5 is any indication, there’s plenty of fun left. It just goes to show you that you don’t need a bunch of goals to have a captivating game.

Seidenberg expected to sign with Islanders

BOSTON, MA - JUNE 08:  Dennis Seidenberg #44 of the Boston Bruins skates against Mason Raymond #21 of the Vancouver Canucks during Game Four of the 2011 NHL Stanley Cup Final at TD Garden on June 8, 2011 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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Dennis Seidenberg is expected to sign with the New York Islanders after the World Cup, according to TSN’s Darren Dreger.

It’s a one-year, $1 million deal, per Dreger.

Seidenberg is currently playing a significant role for Team Europe, a surprise finalist against the heavily favored Canadians.

The 35-year-old defenseman was unexpectedly bought out by the Boston Bruins over the summer. He had two years remaining on his contract, with a cap hit of $4 million.

Seidenberg was a key part of the Bruins’ Stanley Cup champion team in 2011, but injuries limited him to just 61 games last season, and his average ice time fell below 20 minutes for the first time since he was with the Hurricanes in 2007-08.

He’ll likely take on a bottom-pairing role with the Islanders, below Nick Leddy, Travis Hamonic, Johnny Boychuk, and Calvin de Haan. He may even be the extra defenseman, pushing the likes of Thomas Hickey, Ryan Pulock, Adam Pelech, and Scott Mayfield for a spot in the lineup.

Related: Seidenberg shocked by Bruins’ decision

Devils bolster defense, ink Quincey to one-year, $1.25M deal

Detroit Red Wings v Columbus Blue Jackets
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New Jersey needed some blueline depth after this summer’s blockbuster Adam Larsson-for-Taylor Hall trade and now, they’ve addressed it.

On Wednesday, GM Ray Shero announced the club signed veteran defenseman Kyle Quincey to a one-year, $1.25 million deal.

Quincey, 31, spent the last four seasons in Detroit, emerging as a regular fixture on defense — but ’15-16 was hardly a positive campaign.

He missed 35 games with a serious ankle injury and, upon his return, never seemed to find his way into head coach Jeff Blashill’s good graces.

Blashill even scratched Quincey in Game 3 of Detroit’s opening-round playoff loss to Tampa, and didn’t provide a reason why — a pretty bold move for a player that, in ’13-14, appeared in all 82 games for the Red Wings, averaging nearly 21 minutes per night.

Overall, this move seems like a pretty reasonable gamble from the Devils. Quincey has his flaws, but the term is short and the money is relatively low.

(Especially considering Quincey’s coming off a two-year, $8.5 million deal that paid $4.25M annually.)

Shero could end up getting a nice return on his investment. Quincey projects  to challenge for top-four minutes in New Jersey, looking to break into a group that features the likes of Andy Greene, Damon Severson, John Moore and Ben Lovejoy.

Jon Merrill, Steve Santini and Brandon Gormley are also in that mix, though likely to be challenging for spots on the bottom pair.

Boucher: Phaneuf was ‘terrific coup’ for Sens

TORONTO, ON - MARCH 5:  Dion Phaneuf #2 of the Ottawa Senators skates against the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on March 5,2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Senators defeated the Maple Leafs 3-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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Safe to say Guy Boucher is a big fan of the trade that brought Dion Phaneuf to Ottawa last season.

“Phaneuf has made a huge impact,” Boucher said of last season’s blockbuster swap with Toronto, per the Citizen. “It was a terrific coup by the organization being able to bring him in. We definitely, as a team, need that type of leadership — somebody who has been there, has a lot of character, with a voice that has impact.”

Boucher then confirmed Phaneuf would serve as an alternate captain this season. The 30-year-old will wear it on the road, while Kyle Turris will wear it at home. Veteran winger Chris Neil will be a full-time alternate.

So Phaneuf is taking on a bigger role, a story in itself considering he took on a pretty large one after joining the Sens last season. In 20 games, he averaged 23:10 TOI — up from the 22:02 he was playing in Toronto — and formed a consistent pairing with young Cody Ceci, the defenseman Ottawa took 15th overall at the 2012 draft.

Of course, not everybody thought the move was a big win.

Detractors pointed towards Phaneuf’s contract — a seven-year, $49 million pact that carries a $7 million AAV through 2021. It’s one of the most lucrative deals in the NHL, and gave Ottawa two of the 12 highest-paid blueliners in the league.

Considering the Sens finished 26th in the NHL last season in goals allowed, that last sentence is a tad embarrassing.

It was also clear Toronto wanted to make Phaneuf’s contract go away. He wasn’t going to be part of the rebuild and, while he’s still a useful and impactful player, he was a ghost of the team’s past. It was difficult to envision the new wave of Toronto’s young talent taking over, especially with Phaneuf (and Phaneuf’s presence) in the room.

But that same presence is considered a big plus in Ottawa.

The hope now, of course, is that Phaneuf will be more comfortable in the Canadian capital, having adjusted to the move and his new surroundings.

The World Cup seems destined to end with a quiet thud

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 27: Steven Stamkos #91 of Team Canada blocks Nino Niederreiter #22 shot on net during Game One of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 27, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Dennis Pajot/Getty Images)
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If Team Europe was ever going to make the World Cup final interesting, it was probably going to happen last night. The heavily favored Canadians were bound to come out a bit flat against a non-traditional opponent, and that’s exactly what happened in a less-than-electric Air Canada Centre.

But despite carrying the play for much of the first period, the underdogs trailed 2-0 after 20 minutes. They would go on to lose, 3-1.

It could’ve gone a different way, but it didn’t.

“In the first, I thought that they were better than us for large stretches of the game at times,” said Team Canada’s head coach, Mike Babcock. “I thought they executed and played fast. I didn’t think we moved the puck out of our zone at all tonight, went back and forth. We had guys out there that didn’t talk to one another so actually didn’t play fast and then turned the pack over on entry, so they looked quicker than they were and we probably looked slower than we were.”

Team Europe’s coach, Ralph Krueger, was left to bemoan what could’ve been, while trying to build on the positives.

“I thought we could have tested (Carey) Price a lot more with the chances we had, and some of them just died on our own sticks,” he said. “But lots of good things there, lots of effort, and something to build on for Game 2 for sure.”

The problem for the Europeans is that they’re unlikely to catch their opponents on another off night. Expect a much more motivated, much less sloppy Canadian side in Game 2.

“For whatever reason, we weren’t as good as we felt we were capable of being, so we’ll fix that and be better,” said Babcock. “You’d like things to be perfect every night, but it’s just not real.”

Game 2 goes Thursday in Toronto. A Canadian victory and that’s it for the tournament — one that started with a decent amount of positive buzz, thanks to a couple of spirited Canada-U.S. exhibition games and the high-flying exploits of Team North America, but seems destined to end with a quiet thud.

Unless, of course, the Europeans can find a way to push it to Game 3, but that was always an unlikely scenario. They had a chance to make things interesting on Tuesday. They probably won’t get another.

Related: Kesler was ‘really disappointed’ with World Cup atmosphere