Shea Weber, Bobby Ryan

PHT Predicts: Ducks vs. Predators — Who do you have?

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All right so Anaheim-Nashville isn’t exactly the kind of match-up that grabs you by the face and makes you want to watch it, we admit that. When you start checking these two teams out though, we’re thinking this series could turn out to be the best of the first round battles. Both teams play a hard, physical game.

Nashville thrives on defense and with a pair of blue liners like Shea Weber and Ryan Suter it’s easy to see why they’d be strong there. Having Pekka Rinne as your goaltender helps make life easier on the offense so they don’t have to do too much. Good thing too since Patric Hornqvist, Martin Erat, and Mike Fisher are about all they can count on offensively.

Anaheim has made their living scoring in bunches. Rocket Richard winner Corey Perry leads the way and 40 year-old Teemu Selanne is making people think it’s 1993 all over again. Add those guys along with Ryan Getzlaf, Bobby Ryan and offensive blue liners Cam Fowler and Lubomir Visnovsky the Ducks look like an offensive juggernaut in comparison. Their only issues come in goal where any one of Dan Ellis, Jonas Hiller, or Ray Emery could see action.

Yeah, it’s a contrast of styles all right and what we think matches that.

James says:
On one hand, you have a playoff-proven Ducks team with quite possibly the best trio of forwards in the NHL. This team is thrilling and sloppy like an adorable, oversized puppy dog. Meanwhile the Predators resemble a stray dog that’s been away from home too long. They are lean and mean, with very few frills but they break out their Costco-sized batch of elbow grease when the going gets tough.

If Nashville will ever win a playoff series, it will be this one. They have the steady goaltending situation, the all-world defenseman looking for a big raise (Shea Weber) and the defensive style that theoretically should translate to the postseason. Anaheim’s explosive offense makes me nervous, but the Ducks’ uncertainty in net and vulnerability on defense makes me feel comfortable to pick the fifth seed in another series.

It’s the Predators in 6 as Pekka Rinne shows us why so many people think he deserves Vezina Trophy consideration.

Matt says:
If it weren’t for Hawks/Canucks III, this would be the most interesting series in the West. The Ducks are one of the hottest teams entering the playoffs; while the Predators have been talking about how they must make it past the first round. Just about any outcome could happen and it wouldn’t be terribly surprising—from a Ducks sweep to the Preds in 7. Even though the Ducks have been on fire, when push comes to shove I’ll take the better defense and goaltending in a playoff series. Predators in 6.

Joe says:
About the only thing I feel certain of between these two teams is that this series is going deep. Six or seven games for sure and how it turns out feels like a coin flip. Anaheim’s offense is killer and they’ve got the best first line in the NHL. Getting Selanne’s production alongside a leader like Saku Koivu and a pair of lines that can grind it out with the best of them, it’s tough to resist them. Rinne’s goaltending is fantastic and their defense is nasty but that offense doesn’t sit well with me. I put no confidence into this prediction, but I’m sticking with it. Ducks in 7.

Not liking what our take is on this series or you want to take up the flag for Pekka Rinne or Corey Perry as your own personal series MVPs? Go ahead and vote in our poll and let us know what you think.

Video: Flyers’ Simmonds gets tossed for sucker-punch after retaliating to McDonagh’s cross-check

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Some rough stuff in Saturday’s matinee between the New York Rangers and Philadelphia Flyers.

Wayne Simmonds was thrown out of the game after he punched Ryan McDonagh.

As you can see from the video at the top of the page, McDonagh nails Simmonds with a cross-check to the head before the Flyers forward went after him.

McDonagh left the game with a possible concussion.

Here’s how the referees handed out the penalties:

penalties

Simmonds received a five-minute major and was tossed from the game while McDonagh received two separate two-minute penalties.

The Rangers were unable to score on the ensuing power play, and that’s when more weird stuff happened.

Here’s how the New York Daily News described the moments after the penalty expired:

The Rangers were already upset with Simmonds’ sucker punch, but then Alain Vigneault lost his mind all over again at the end of the Rangers’ unsuccessful power play: The Flyers had forgotten to put a player in the penalty box, with Simmonds having been sent off.

Illegally, during the flow of play, forward Jake Voracek just jumped off Philly’s bench as the power play expired and was sprung on a breakaway. Lundqvist made the save but the Rangers were flabbergasted at the officials’ lack of control or apparent knowledge of the rule book, which would require the Flyers in that situation to wait until a whistle to put their fifth man back on the ice.

By the way, the referees for this game are Dave Lewis and Kelly Sutherland.

Video: Brodeur, Schneider, Holtby participate in ceremonial faceoff

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You don’t see this very often.

The New Jersey Devils and Washington Capitals added an interesting twist to the ceremonial faceoff prior to Saturday’s game.

Former Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur dropped the puck, but instead of the captains taking the draw, it was the two starting goaltenders-Braden Holtby and Cory Schneider.

You can watch the highlights from the ceremony by clicking the video at the top of the page.

Before the ceremony, Brodeur had some kind words for Holtby.

“He reminds me of me a lot,” Brodeur said, per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “Not the way he plays, but the way he puts himself out there.

“He’s not scared. He just wants to play. I’m sure he’s playing through tons of injuries. He’s a warrior out there. I don’t know him and I don’t know if he does or not, but he’s having a great year. Not just this year; last year he was coming on and he’s going to be good for a long time for them.”

The Devils will be retiring Brodeur’s number 30 prior to Tuesday’s game against the Edmonton Oilers.

The 43-year-old won 688 games and posted 124 shutouts as a member of the Devils between 1991 and 2014.

He also won three Stanley Cups and four Vezina Trophies in his career.

Mike Yeo gets a vote of confidence; Wild will scratch Vanek, Zucker vs. STL

Minnesota Wild head coach Mike Yeo talks to Jason Zucker (16) in the first period of an NHL preseason hockey game against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Pittsburgh, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
Associated Press
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Things haven’t been going well with Minnesota’s hockey team, but that doesn’t necessarily mean changes are coming via firings or trades.

On Saturday, Wild General Manager Chuck Fletcher reiterated his confidence in his team and his coaching staff going forward.

The Wild have won just three of 15 games since Jan. 1 and they’re currently riding a four-game losing streak.

The Wild have been through mid-season slumps before.

Last year, Yeo lost it during a team practice and that seemed to spark his team, as they were able to turn things around and make it to the postseason.

Will a similar tactic work, again? Probably not.

As PHT pointed out earlier this week, this slump might not be like the previous ones.

The Wild are just one point behind Nashville (with a game in a hand) for the final Wild Card spot in the Western Conference, but will their top guns be able to get them out of this funk?

The numbers aren’t pretty:

Zach Parise has no points in his last four games and just one goal in his last nine contests.

Thomas Vanek hasn’t scored in eight games. He has just one assist during that span.

Mikko Koivu has four assists in 15 games since the new year began.

Mikael Granlund has two assists since Jan. 7 and he has a a minus-11 rating since then.

Jason Zucker has one assist in 11 games. He hasn’t scored since Jan. 7.

How will Yeo get his team’s attention this time around?

Here’s your answer:

Hossa doesn’t think the coach’s challenge is “good for the league”

Chicago Blackhawks' Jonathan Toews, left, Marian Hossa (81) and Bryan Bickell (29) react after Los Angeles Kings' Jake Muzzin scored a goal  during the third period in Game 2 of the Western Conference finals in the NHL hockey Stanley Cup playoffs in Chicago on Wednesday, May 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
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Marian Hossa isn’t a fan of the coach’s challenge.

The veteran winger ripped the NHL’s new challenge system after he had a goal called back in Thursday’s game against Arizona.

–To watch the overturned goal, click here

“I thought that was [a] joke,” Hossa said, per the Sun-Times. “I tried to battle in front of the net and I don’t have any intention to touch the goalie, just try to battle through two guys and put the puck in the net. I don’t know what’s going to happen in the playoffs, if there’s going to be calls after calls after calls. But I don’t think it’s good for the league.”

The goal was called back because as Hossa was battling in front, he got tangled up with goaltender Louis Domingue‘s stick.

It’s safe to say that Joel Quenneville wasn’t pleased with the decision:

One of the main criticisms of the challenge system is that the review is conducted on a small tablet by the referees on the ice instead of someone in a war room in Toronto or New York.

Every time a goal is disallowed, the NHL writes a blog explaining why the decision was made.

Here’s what they said about the call on Hossa:

The Referee determined that Hossa interfered with Domingue before the puck crossed the goal line. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Referee, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that the goal should have been disallowed due to ‘Interference on the Goalkeeper,’ as described in Rules 69.1, 69.3 and 69.4.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Chicago Blackhawks.

Do you think the referee got the call right?