Lou Lamoriello, Ilya Kovalchuk,  Jeff Vanderbeek,

Report: NHL’s salary cap could rise to $62.2M for 2011-12 season

There have been some debatable trends occurring in the NHL since the lockout ended, but there’s at least one that is undeniable: the league’s salary cap has risen every season. The 2010-11 season’s ceiling is $59.4 million, but the NHL Players Association could vote on a measure that would bump it up about 4.7 percent to $62.2 million for 2011-12, according to Larry Brooks of the NY Post.

That would be an approximate jump of $2.8 million, a little bit less than what James Neal will make for the Pittsburgh Penguins next season. Obviously, such a measure would be a good thing for the teams who are hard up against the cap, such as Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Chicago and Detroit.

If the NHLPA approves the five percent escalator that would make this happen — Brooks notes that revenues didn’t increase enough or at all to make the cap go up naturally — then the cap floor would be around $46.2 million. That minimum amount of spent money could be a serious downer for the league’s poorest teams, such as the Islanders.

Before fans of big market teams get visions of mid-level free agents dancing in their heads, Brooks notes that there would be some drawbacks for the players’ union, despite the fact that a higher cap means more money available in free agency.

There is no guarantee that the union will vote to adopt the 5-percent inflator, given that doing so leads to increased escrow as a tradeoff for additional dollars in the system that benefits free agents and high payroll, powerful teams seeking to keep their rosters intact.

But as 2011-12 represents the final year of the CBA, the 7.5-percent bonus cushion that allows clubs to defer up to that amount in performance bonuses on entry level and over-35 contracts will disappear. According to several sources, that will be an important consideration that is expected to prompt to players to vote for the escalator.

Keep in mind that this story is a based on information relayed to Brooks through the NHL’s agents and it isn’t an official report. It’s also speculation based on the union approving the escalator, so keep that in mind.

Still, it would be surprising if the players didn’t approve this measure. A higher salary cap stinks for the sad sack franchises, but ultimately is a good thing for the league. Of the 30 teams in the league, 12 are currently $1.1 million or less away from the cap ceiling at this moment according to CapGeek.com. Conversely, only six teams sit $10 million or more under the ceiling and one of those teams (the Atlanta Thrashers) might find themselves in a more hockey-mad market depending on their ownership situation.

So, overall, a higher cap would be a good thing for the teams that are making and spending money. It’s also a decent bet for fans since it helps clubs retain free agents, even if teams like the Flyers will use a rising cap as a goofy excuse when they raise ticket prices.

(Hey, Ville Leino won’t be cheap though, right?)

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
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Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two:

Add Lecavalier to list of expensive Flyers healthy scratches

Vincent Lecavalier

Are the Philadelphia Flyers aiming for some sort of record when it comes to expensive (potential) healthy scratches?

While lineups are obviously subject to change, CSNPhilly.com notes that Vincent Lecavalier appears to be among a rather rich group of Flyers who are expected to sit during their season-opener.

Also likely to be in street clothes: Sam Gagner and Luke Schenn.

That’s $11.3 million in cap space rotting on the bench.

“I really don’t know what to say,” Lecavalier said. “I’ll practice hard and be ready when they call me up.”

The CSNPhilly.com quotes from Lecavalier, Gagner and Schenn only get sadder from there, a reminder that there are human beings attached to these numbers – whether you focus on disappointing stats or bloated salaries.

Flyers fans with the urge to reach for an Alka-Setzler can at least take some comfort in knowing that the team will see $6.8 million in savings after this season, as both Gagner and Schenn are on expiring deals.

It could be a long season, though, and this Lecavalier headache may not truly end until his contract expires following the 2017-18 campaign.