Tim Thomas sets new single-season NHL record for save percentage

The big story out of Boston’s 3-1 win over Ottawa today was that Tim Thomas was able to break an NHL record that many fans might not be aware of.

With the Bruins playing tomorrow and Tuukka Rask getting the start then against New Jersey, Thomas broke Dominik Hasek’s single-season save percentage record finishing the year with a .9381 mark. Hasek set the record in the 1998-1999 season with a .937 save percentage as he was under siege that season and led the Buffalo Sabres to the Stanley Cup final. That season Hasek won the Vezina Trophy as the league’s top goaltender. All signs would point to a similar honor coming for Thomas at the end of this season.

One thing Thomas would like to do that Hasek did that year is make the Stanley Cup final. While Hasek wasn’t able to hold back the Dallas Stars that year, with the way Boston is rounding into form heading into the playoffs you’d have to think they stand a good chance of getting to the final and perhaps doing what Hasek couldn’t do that season.

Thomas’ work this year has been other-worldly for the most part and while he doesn’t have the numerous shutouts that Henrik Lundqvist of the Rangers has piled up (11 to be exact), he’s done well for himself by shutting teams out nine times this year. Putting a stellar 2.02 goals against average next to that .938 save percentage looks damn fine as well.

Thomas’ comeback this season has been a tremendous story. After dealing with a hip injury last season that seemed to doom his ability to be a starter again in the future along with Tuukka Rask’s rise to glory, Thomas’ ability to keep it going this year seemed in doubt. He’s more than silenced the critics this season. Now Thomas will prepare for the playoffs and what could prove to be a first round date with either Montreal or Buffalo.

PHT Morning Skate: On how Jacques Plante ‘revolutionized’ hockey

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Brian Campbell may have spoken to teams about continuing his career, but he didn’t start negotiating with any of them because he knew he wasn’t willing to continue playing. “I’ve been thinking about [retirement] for a while. At the end of the season, I didn’t know if I was ready to do it anymore. So that was only fair. But I will say July 1 was tough, a tough day. There’ve been some tough days. But I think we’re happy with our decision.” (CSN Chicago)

–The Hockey Writers ranked each team’s farm system from 1 to 31. Interestingly enough, the Vegas Golden Knights don’t have the worst system in the league. That honor belongs to the San Jose Sharks. The number one team on the list is the Philadelphia Flyers. (The Hockey Writers)

Ryan Nugent-Hopkins has been with the Oilers for six years now, but he still hasn’t established himself as one of the dominant forces on the team. Per the Edmonton Journal, he could be skating on thin ice. “With Draisaitl likely to be paid next season and McDavid already signed to big money the following campaign, the cap budget at centre is tight. Whether Nugent-Hopkins stays or goes in the longer term, he needs a major bounceback next season to prove his worth.” (Edmonton Journal)

–On Nov. 1, 1959, Jacques Plante revolutionized the game of hockey by putting on a goalie mask for the first time. NHL.com contributor Stan Fischler wrote: “The legacy of Plante’s decision is evident in today’s game. Not only are all goaltenders required to wear a mask, but teams must dress two goalies for every game. And when a goalie’s mask comes off during a game, the whistle is blown and play is stopped.” It’s a remarkable story. (NHL.com)

–It’s always fun to think about how teams over in Europe would do against an NHL team. With the help of a couple of Russian hockey journalists, The Score put together a KHL all-star team, and asked fans to vote on where they think that team would finish in the NHL. Most people feel like the KHL all-stars would finish somewhere between 17th and 29th in the NHL. (The Score)

Justin Williams signed a contract with the Carolina Hurricanes this summer, which means he had to move out of Washington. Some of his valuables got a little more attention than others:

Teammates, friends were glad to see Okposo back on the ice

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From the sound of things, Kyle Okposo‘s presence at “Da Beauty League” was a beautiful sight for Buffalo Sabres teammates, former teammates on the New York Islanders, and friends around the NHL.

NHL.com’s Jessi Pierce was at that informal game, which apparently didn’t go well for Okposo’s team.

That’s not the important part, certainly not in July. While Pierce noted that Okposo wasn’t comfortable answering questions during his first on-ice action in almost four months, it sounds like the talented winger was looking good on Wednesday night.

Onlookers agreed with that sentiment, and also seconded the notion that he’s been doing well this summer, overall.

“Obviously seeing a teammate go through something like that and struggle to get healthy is tough,” Sabres teammate Hudson Fasching said, via Pierce’s piece for NHL.com. “He’s such a good guy and going through a lot with that whole deal, trying to figure out what was wrong.

“I’m just happy he’s healthy and happy for him to get back.”

It was already noted that Okposo is expected to be ready for Sabres training camp, yet nights like these make it clearer that he’s likely on course. That’s a fantastic turnaround from his health scare in April.

Pierce also has more here.

Gaudreau on Flames’ future: ‘We have three great years ahead of us’

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Things change quickly in hockey, but it’s often especially interesting when someone gives their team a “window” for their best chances at success.

Considering the trying summer for the Capitals, GM Brian MacLellan’s two-year window proclamation might have been dead-on for Washington. If Johnny Gaudreau has similar prognosticating skills, then the Calgary Flames need to take some big swings in the next three seasons.

“I think we have three great years ahead of us,” Gaudreau said last week, according to NHL.com. “I’m really looking forward to these next three years.”

No, this isn’t Gaudreau hedging his bets based on his own situation; his contract runs through 2021-22. His partner-in-crime Sean Monahan‘s deal expires after 2022-23, so it’s not that, either.

Instead, the dazzling young forward noted that some of the team’s most important supporting cast members are locked in for three more years. Take a look:

Expiring after 2019-20:

T.J. Brodie ($4.65 million)
Travis Hamonic ($3.86M)
Michael Frolik ($4.3M)
Troy Brouwer ($4.5M)
Michael Stone ($3.5M)

Meanwhile, Mike Smith‘s contract lasts two more seasons, as does the rookie deal for Matthew Tkachuk. Dougie Hamilton‘s signed up for four more himself.

Gaudreau likely didn’t have this in mind, but it’s reasonable to wonder how much longer Mark Giordano will be at or near an elite level. Yes, he’s at a reasonable $6.75M for five more seasons, but he’s already 33.

All things considered, Gaudreau is reasonable in pinpointing these next three seasons specifically. In particular, defensemen as talented as Brodie and Hamonic are almost certain to command higher prices.

On the other hand, merely having such a talented player as Gaudreau signed for such a reasonable deal – not to mention the Flames lacking many “albatross” contracts – could mean that they’ll have a solid chance at competing for some time. Still, Gaudreau might be right that this is Calgary’s best chance at winning big in quite some time.

AHL teams can loan certain players to 2018 Winter Olympics

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Players on American Hockey League contracts will be eligible to play in the 2018 Winter Olympics.

President and CEO David Andrews confirmed through a league spokesman Wednesday that teams were informed they could loan players on AHL contracts to national teams for the purposes of participating in the Pyeongchang Olympics. The AHL sent a memo to its 30 clubs saying players could only be loaned for Olympic participation from Feb. 5-26.

The Olympic men’s hockey tournament runs from Feb. 9-25. Like the NHL, which is not having its players participate for the first time since 1994, the AHL does not have an Olympic break in its schedule.

The AHL’s decision does not affect players assigned to that league on NHL contracts. No final decision has been made about those players.

Follow Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/SWhyno .

More AP NHL: http://www.apnews.com/tag/NHLhockey