Derick Brassard, Marc Methot

Looking at the Selke Trophy candidates

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The ballots have been distributed to members of the Professional Hockey Writers Association for the year-end awards and debate is starting for each category. Since voting for the “best defensive forward” is such a subjective award, the Selke is usually one of the toughest to vote on. With that in mind, here are a few players who will get consideration this year—and a few who should.

The Usual Suspects

Ryan Kesler: The powerful 2-way forward in Vancouver has been the favorite this season since the moment Pavel Datsyuk’s name was called in Las Vegas last June. He finished as runner-up last season and if everything goes as expected, this will be the third straight year he’ll be up for the award. Among players who have played at least 70 games this season, Kesler is third in the league with a 17.9 CORSI rating. On top of the penalty killing, 3 shorthanded goals, and 57.4% faceoff percentage, he’s tied for 5th in the league with 37 goals. They can say offensive numbers don’t matter, but every year the finalists consist of great two-way players—not defensive specialists.

Pavel Datsyuk: The three-time defending Selke Trophy winner will be in the discussion until the day retires. Let’s put it this way, the last person to win the award NOT named Pavel Datsyuk was Rod Brind’Amour. That would be retired former Carolina captain Rod Brind’Amour. He’s in the top 10 in takeaways (as usual), yet he’s only played in 53 games. Voters are creatures of habit so he’ll always be in the conversation, but missing so many games due to injury may keep him off the podium this year.

Jonathan Toews: If Datsyuk usually excels in the takeaway category, then Toews is approaching his level. He’s second in the league with 90 takeaways, but even more impressive is that he only has given away the puck 26 times. Sure, these are highly subjective statistics—but any gap that substantial is bound to get the attention of voters. He’s an impressive 56.3% in the faceoff dot and plays almost 2 minutes per game killing penalties for the Blackhawks.

The Dark Horse Candidates

Frans Nielson: If for no other reason, Frans Nielsen is going to get consideration because of his 7 shorthanded goals and 8 shorthanded points. His 2:59 per game of shorthanded ice-time is more than every defenseman on his team other than Mark Eaton. That in itself shows how much Scott Gordon and Jack Capuano trust him on the ice.

Manny Malhotra: Ryan Kesler may have been preordained as the Selke nominee from the Canucks this season—but people around the team will tell you that newcomer Manny Malhotra has been just as important (if not more) to the team for keeping the puck out of their own net. His 61.7% faceoff percentage is 2nd in the league (Steckel) and he starts 75% of his shifts in the defensive zone. When Alain Vigneault has utilized a stopper unit, Malhotra has been centering it. His near catastrophic eye-injury last month has drawn attention to what he’s done for the Canucks, but it’s still hard to believe he’ll get any of the votes already headed Kesler’s way.

Deserve more consideration

Ryan Callahan: Looking at hockey’s advanced statistics, Ryan Callahan’s name shows up all over the place. He plays against the best competition (relative to CORSI) and is still putting up good numbers on both the offensive side and team statistics while he’s on the ice. Of course, playing on the same line as Brandon Dubinsky, playing wing (not center), and the NY hockey writers boycotting the vote won’t help at all. But he should probably get more consideration than he’ll get.

Anze Kopitar: The Los Angeles Kings launched a mini-effort for Kopitar to receive some recognition for his two-way play before he was sidelined with a gruesome ankle injury. He’s a team-best +25 and Terry Murray has trusted him with some of the toughest match-ups the league has to offer. On most nights, the Kings head coach trusted the young Slovenian to match-up against the opponent’s best lines, shut them down with strong two-way play, and still lead his team in scoring. If he’s getting noticed this year, he may get a little more recognition next year.

David Backes: Being +28 on a team that isn’t going to be close to making the playoffs should count for something; especially considering the fact that the next best forward on his team is a +14.  Throw in 209 hits this season and it’s easy to see he’s been doing things the right way when he doesn’t have the puck.

Dave Bolland: Ryan Callahan may play against the strongest competition when it comes to CORSI, but if we were to look at relative plus/minus of the competition, Bolland is drawing the hardest assignments in the league. Suffering an injury when the voters are looking for candidates certainly won’t help his cause, and neither will sharing the same jersey as Jonathan Toews. Regardless, Bolland should be somewhere on the “others receiving votes” list this year.

What about you? Who do you think should be the three finalists this year for the Selke Trophy? Let us know in the comments.

It sounds like Troy Brouwer would love to return to the Blues

DALLAS, TX - MAY 07:  Troy Brouwer #36 of the St. Louis Blues celebrates with Robby Fabbri #15 of the St. Louis Blues after scoring a goal against Kari Lehtonen #32 of the Dallas Stars in the second period in Game Five of the Western Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at American Airlines Center on May 7, 2016 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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How much is Troy Brouwer‘s magical postseason run worth to the St. Louis Blues or some other team in free agency? How important is comfort and familiarity to Troy Brouwer?

Those seem to be the most important bigger-picture questions, although from the sound of Brouwer’s comments, nuts-and-bolts issues may decide his future in or outside of St. Louis.

Brouwer raved about his time with the Blues as the team spoke with the media to close out the 2015-16 season. The power forward seemed very happy about his living conditions and the way his style fits with this blue collar team.

Even so, Brouwer also admits that “it’s a business.”

That’s typical talk, yet it was more interesting when he went a little deeper, acknowledging that he understands that GM Doug Armstrong must ask questions about more than just the 2016-17 season.

His playoff production was fantastic, but a smart GM will realize that it probably wasn’t sustainable. Case in point, facts like these:

Even so, Brouwer brings considerable value if you keep expectations in check.

While he fell a little bit short this season with 18, he generally falls in the 20-goal range each year. He’s one of those players who can bring some grit to the table without totally taking away from your team in other ways.

Brouwer was one of the Blues’ top penalty-killing forwards to boot.

It wouldn’t be the least bit surprising for Brouwer to enjoy a healthy raise from his expired $3.67 million cap hit, yet you must wonder how much. Maybe most importantly, what kind of term is he looking for?

That last question might just be pivotal regarding a possible return to the Blues. Would he sacrifice some stability to try to make another run with St. Louis?

Even if he isn’t that old at 30, his rugged style might mean that this is one of his last opportunities for a big payday.

Both sides face a tough call, yet it sounds like a reunion is at least plausible.

Related

Tough questions await the Blues

David Backes would prefer to return, too

Trio of Pens forwards take maintenance day on Saturday

TAMPA, FL - MAY 24:  Chris Kunitz #14 of the Pittsburgh Penguins shoots the puck against the Tampa Bay Lightning during the first period in Game Six of the Eastern Conference Final during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Amalie Arena on May 24, 2016 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)
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The Pittsburgh Penguins are about as healthy as you can be at this stage of the game. Outside of Trevor Daley (ankle), who’s done for the playoffs, the Pens have their desired roster at their disposal. That doesn’t mean that certain veterans don’t need a little bit of time to recuperate from the grind of the first three rounds.

On Saturday, Nick Bonino, Matt Cullen and Chris Kunitz didn’t participate in practice. Coach Mike Sullivan confirmed that each player had taken a maintenance day.

The 36-year-old Kunitz and 39-year-old Cullen have surely picked up some bumps and bruises throughout the postseason, while Bonino might still feel the effects of a shot block from Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final.

Not to worry Penguins fans, Sullivan says that each player should be available for Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Monday night.

Related:

Pens enter Stanley Cup Final as favorites: online bookmaker

Need for speed: Sharks, Pens brace for ‘fast hockey’ in Stanley Cup Final

Pittsburgh’s run fueled by ‘Baby Pens’

‘No question,’ David Backes wants to stay in St. Louis

ST LOUIS, MO - MAY 17:  David Backes #42 of the St. Louis Blues looks on in Game Two of the Western Conference Final against the San Jose Sharks during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Scottrade Center on May 17, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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We don’t always get what we want…but we try.

In David Backes‘ case, he’d like to remain a member of the St. Louis Blues going forward. It might be difficult to make the numbers work, but the two sides will give it a go.

Backes, who is set to become an unrestricted free agent on July 1st, scored 21 goals and 45 points in 79 games in 2015-16. The 32-year-old added seven goals and 14 points in 20 postseason games before the Blues were eliminated by the Sharks in the Western Conference Final.

Re-signing their captain will likely interest the Blues, but can they make it work under the salary cap? St. Louis also has to re-sign RFA Jaden Schwartz and fellow UFA Troy Brouwer this off-season.

The Blues might have to pick between keeping Brouwer or Backes and that might not work in Backes’ favor. Brouwer is younger, and the fact that St. Louis gave up T.J. Oshie for him just last year could also play a factor in their decision.

Even if St. Louis doesn’t bring back role players like Steve Ott, Kyle Brodziak and Scottie Upshall, they still need to have other players fill those spots on their third and fourth lines, which will eat into their limited cap space.

If they want to make room for Backes and/or Brouwer, the Blues may have to part ways with a defenseman like Kevin Shattenkirk (one year left at $4.25 million).

It looks like the Blues might be looking for a new captain in 2016-17.

‘It was a lot of ups and downs’: Pekka Rinne’s frustrating 2015-16 season

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The 2015-16 season won’t go down as the best year of Pekka Rinne‘s career. Rinne started the season off for the Nashville Predators relatively well, as he had a 10-2-3 record from the start of the year through Nov. 17. He had given up two goals or less in 10 of those 15 decisions and it looked like he would have another fantastic year.

That’s when things fell apart in a hurry.Rinne went on to lose seven of his next eight games. His once promising season was fading.

The 33-year-old’s season wasn’t all bad. He finished with a 34-21-10 record, but he had a mediocre 2.48 goals-against-average and .908 save percentage. His goals-against-average ranked 19th among goalies who played 40 games or more and his save percentage ranked 26th.

It’s safe to say the consistency was lacking.

In the end, his stick paid the price (top).

“It was a lot of ups and downs,” said Rinne, per the Tennessean. “Personally, I wanted to be better during the regular season. I always have high expectations for myself. I thought that it was hard to get consistency going on throughout the season. I feel like I had a lot of good games, but then (an average game would follow) or something like that.

“It was frustrating at times. Hopefully, my goal is to raise my level of game to where I need it to be and where I want it to be.”

Rinne’s numbers didn’t improve in the playoffs (7-7, 2.63, .906), but he did feel more comfortable about his game overall.

“I’m personally happy with how the season ended for me,” Rinne said. “I thought that I played my best hockey in (the) playoffs. I was able to raise my level of game and the way I played.”

Is Rinne on the decline or was this just a blip on the radar? We’ll find out, but don’t expect a change of scenery coming for the veteran. He probably won’t be leaving Nashville anytime soon. He has three years remaining on his contract at $7 million per year and the Predators don’t exactly have someone ready to take over.