Corey Perry, Ryan Getzlaf

Corey Perry, Daniel Sedin and Pekka Rinne named Three Stars of March

Moments ago, we discussed the notion that Brad Marchand is still trying to find the right balance between being a pest who goads opponents off their game while avoiding being the kind of guy who hurts his own squad in the process. In a dream world for the Boston Bruins, Marchand would emulate Anaheim Ducks super-pest Corey Perry, who was named the No. 1 star for the month of March.

Along with Perry, the league honored Vancouver Canucks winger Daniel Sedin and underrated Nashville Predators goalie Pekka Rinne in its three stars award. All three players have generated some serious buzz for a Hart Trophy nomination, so perhaps it makes sense that they’re taking over during what is probably the most important full month of the NHL regular season.

Here are summaries of each players’ months, with our comments plus tidbits from the league’s press release.

First star: Perry

For years, Perry has been a fantasy hockey gem because he produces nice point totals and hefty penalty minutes, but this has been an even greater breakthrough season for him offensively. He leads the NHL with 46 goals, is fourth in the league with 89 points and also tied Daniel Sedin and Alex Ovechkin for the most game-winning goals with an impressive 10. Here’s a snapshot of his month:

Perry led the NHL in goals (15) and tied for the lead in points (21) in 14 games, helping the Ducks (44-28-5) climb to seventh place in the Western Conference standings. He also posted a League-leading four game-winning goals and registered a +9 rating.

Second star: D. Sedin

Last season was a true star-making moment for Daniel’s twin Henrik Sedin, as the freakish Swedish center showed he could succeed in spurts without his brother and earned a Hart Trophy for his troubles. It’s unclear if Daniel will match that Hart-winning achievement, but he makes a compelling argument as the league leader in scoring (100 points) on what is by far the NHL’s best team. Here’s a glance at his fantastic month.

Sedin tied for the League lead in points with 21 (nine goals, 12 assists) in 15 games, helping the Canucks (52-17-9) clinch the Presidents’ Trophy as the team with the best record in the regular season. Sedin recorded points in 12 games and goals in nine, including three game-winning goals (Mar. 5 vs. Los Angeles, Mar. 12 vs. Calgary and Mar. 23 vs. Detroit).

Third star: Rinne

More and more, there’s a chicken vs. egg argument when a goalie puts up great numbers behind a fantastic defense. Sure, Tim Thomas is great, but would be put up those numbers in Edmonton?

Even if you wonder how much the Predators’ defense influences Rinne’s numbers, he’s still very impressive. In fact, it might be a two-horse race between Rinne and Thomas for the Vezina Trophy this season. Here’s what he did in March.

Rinne posted a 9-3-2 record with a 1.91 goals-against average, .936 save percentage and two shutouts, helping the Predators (42-26-10) finish the month in sixth place in the Western Conference playoff race. He allowed two goals or fewer in seven of 14 games, including a 29-save, 3-0 shutout victory over the Vancouver Canucks Mar. 3 and a 19-save 4-0 shutout over the Minnesota Wild Mar. 10.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.