Despite pleas from NHL and Matt Hulsizer, Goldwater Institute remains defiant regarding Coyotes sale


As Matt discussed, potential new Phoenix Coyotes owner Matt Hulsizer announced his plan to get the Coyotes deal done this weekend. He made a considerable concession, guaranteeing that the City of Glendale would get back at least $75 million of the $100 million it would pay in bonds to keep the team in Glendale.

Hulsizer used a television announcement to explain the plan, but also to beg the Goldwater Institute not to follow through on their planned lawsuit. Their potential lawsuit has the potential to derail the deal, creating what might be the biggest roadblock in a bumpy road to sell this team while also avoiding relocation.

Despite pleas from Hulsizer and the NHL alike, TSN reports that the Goldwater Institute won’t budge. The watchdog group released a statement regarding the situation tonight, which included these remarks.

On Friday, Hulsizer sent a letter to Goldwater promising to guarantee $75 million worth of the funds to the city as a measure of protecting citizens from financial risk. But that failed to move the taxpayer advocacy group of its long-held opposition to the deal.

“The offer recognizes the significant risk to taxpayers under the current deal and to that extent is a positive development,” Goldwater Institute president Darcy Olsen said in a statement. “Regrettably, however, the proposal fails to remedy the core legal violation at issue, leaving the expensive taxpayer gamble intact.”

If you’re wondering how the NHL will react to this possible setback, they seem resolute – publicly at least – to keep on fighting to help the Coyotes remain in Glendale.

But Monday night, NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly said Goldwater’s unwavering position will not dissuade the league from continuing its efforts to close the deal with Hulsizer.

“It doesn’t change our equation,” said Daly. “We have never anticipated that Goldwater would change its position. Our objective has been to try to find a solution with or without Goldwater’s endorsement.”

The clock is ticking regarding whether or not the Coyotes will be able to stay in the Arizona area, even if it’s unclear when the countdown will be over. As always, we’ll keep you updated on the latest events at PHT.

Report: Torres won’t appeal 41-game suspension

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Sounds like Raffi Torres is accepting his punishment.

Per Sportsnet, Torres won’t appeal his 41-game suspension for an illegal hit to the head of Anaheim’s Jakob Silfverberg.

The report comes just days after the NHL’s Department of Player Safety levied one of the longest disciplinary rulings in league history, citing both the severity of the Silfverberg hit and Torres’ lengthy history of suspensions, fines and warnings.

There was some thought, however, that Torres would try to challenge the ruling.


He does have a history of success in that department. In 2012,Torres successfully appealed his suspension for a headshot on Chicago’s Marian Hossa, and had his punishment reduced from 25 games to 21.

Torres also isn’t considered a “repeat offender” under the current collective bargaining agreement, as his last suspension came in 2013.

Of course, part of that clean record is due to the fact he hasn’t played much. Torres has largely been sidelined by injury for the last two seasons, missing all of last year with knee problems.

Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman delved further into the repeat offender thing in his latest 30 Thoughts column:

If you read the relevant sections of the CBA, the league takes the position that the repeat offender status is only applicable to fines. Repeaters are fined on a per-game basis, non-repeaters on a per-day basis. (The former is more expensive, because there are fewer games than days in an NHL season.) However, if you go to Section 18.2, among the factors taken into account are, “the status of the offender and, specifically, whether the Player has a history of being subject to Supplementary Discipline for On-Ice Conduct.”

So, in the NHL’s view, a player’s history is relevant, even if longer than 18 months ago.

Should the report prove accurate and Torres doesn’t appeal, he will be eligible to return to action on Jan. 14, when the Sharks take on the Oilers.

Report: Kings, Richards nearing settlement

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The Los Angeles Kings and Mike Richards may be nearing a settlement in their dispute over Richards’ terminated contract, TSN’s Bob McKenzie is reporting.

You can read the report for all the details, but we’re sure curious about this part:

If a settlement is reached, there’s no word yet on what salary cap penalties the Kings would still face. There’s bound to be something, but not likely as onerous as the full value of Richards’ contract, which carries with it a cap hit of $5.75 million. If there’s a settlement, Richards would undoubtedly become a free agent though there’s no telling at this point what monies he would be entitled to from the Kings in a settlement.

The issue here is precedent, and what this case could set. The NHL and NHLPA can’t allow teams to escape onerous contracts through a back door, and many are adamant that that’s what the Kings were attempting to do in Richards’ case.