Marketing failure – Report: If NHL returns to Winnipeg, team won’t be named Winnipeg Jets

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While we don’t know if the NHL is going to make a return to Winnipeg, the speculation of how things will go with the return of the Winnipeg Jets has been well underway for the last few years thanks to the ongoing saga of the Phoenix Coyotes. Lots of NHL fans are nostalgic for those days in the 1980s and 1990s when trips to Winnipeg meant seeing Keith Tkachuk or  Teemu Selanne and the Jets taking the ice clad in white, blue, and red swelling with pride for the city.

As things go when people with money and big ideas for marketing get involved, some of the ad wizards in Manitoba, Canada think it would be a great idea when/if the NHL returns to Winnipeg that the team not be known by that clunky old name that everyone outside of Arizona loves and adores.

Dave Wheeler of the Winnipeg Sun tells us that if NHL hockey is to be played again in Winnipeg, they won’t be calling the team the Winnipeg Jets.

I have it under good authority, that a name, jersey scheme, and logo have already been designed and are ready to go for when the team makes our city its home.

The bad news for some fans — it will not be the Jets. From what I do know, the team will go under the moniker of the Manitoba (TBA).

Making it a provincial team makes financial sense for corporate support, bringing in more dollars from outside the city. Same idea as the Saskatchewan Roughriders, who would have nearly as much support if they were the Regina Roughriders. I have heard some names bounced around the rumour mill, but nothing has been confirmed.

Financial and corporate sense at the local level, perhaps but if this proved to be true at all, the good folks coming up with these ideas in Manitoba might want to step outside of the fishbowl and take a look around. The situation in Phoenix has the added allure for fans because many people were opposed to taking away the Jets in the first place.

Jets merchandise is still sold and marketed by the NHL now and remains very popular thanks to the warm feelings people have from seeing Selanne score 76 goals his rookie season or from growing up playing video games emblazoned with Jets logo and players to make use of. Coming up with a more generic and marketing-wizard type of nickname for the team, while drawing attention to the province of Manitoba rather than the city of Winnipeg, smacks of being a bogus grab to sell and push more merchandise.

Perhaps we’ve found out where the brains behind the Islanders switching from their traditional logo to the infamous “fisherman” have disappeared to. After all, if you want to ruin the support you might get for bringing  a team back to Winnipeg saying you won’t go back to the old name is a pretty good way to do it.

Supporting an idea that hearkens back to something you grew up with does wonders to make people feel good about making it happen. Changing that up and making it abundantly corporate from top to bottom under the guise of trying to make it your own new thing is cold, calculating, and worst of all boring. If we’re going to get hockey back to Winnipeg, make it something that’s lovable and worth rallying around. If it’s the Coyotes that are going end up back there, that’s the best sort of PR you could ask for.

Video: Patrick Marleau scored a beauty in his Leafs debut

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It didn’t take Patrick Marleau long to score a goal for the Toronto Maple Leafs. Yea, it’s the preseason, but it’s still nice to see him adapt to his new surroundings.

Going into Tuesday’s game, the veteran admitted that a new beginning in a new city was exciting, but he didn’t seem stressed by it.

“I wouldn’t say nervous, but definitely some excitement,” Marleau told TSN.ca before the game.

“There’s that energy of something new … you’re not sure how everything’s going to go so you try to stay within yourself.”

He did a pretty good job staying within himself.

With the Leafs trailing 1-0 in the first period of their game against the Ottawa Senators, Marleau entered the Sens zone on the right side and roofed a wrist shot past Mike Condon.

 

“He scored a goal,” Leafs head coach Mike Babcock said, per Sportsnet. “He made a real nice play – he backchecked all the way, he slowed the guy down, he gave our D time, he pushed the pace, he wired it under the bar – I mean Patty was fine.”

Hockey world supports Brian Boyle in his battle against cancer

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On Tuesday, Brian Boyle announced that he had been diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.

As scary as the news must have been for him to hear, Boyle showed the hockey world that he’s going to have a positive outlook on this situation.

“I feel very fortunate and very blessed,” Boyle said, per NHL.com. “We’ve had a tremendous outpouring of prayers, and if there’s anything I can ask it’s that that continues. That is something that I’ve seen firsthand heal cancers and heal situations that are said to be untreatable. For us, we’re in a good spot. We think we have a good plan of attack here and I’m looking forward to getting on the ice and playing.

Immediately, players, teams and fans began sending him messages of support. It’s incredible to see what the hockey community can do when it comes together.

Boyle has already stated that he plans on being in the Devils lineup on opening night.

Jaromir Jagr’s open to many things, but not retirement or a tryout

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Yes, Jaromir Jagr is 45-years-old. He’ll turn 46 in February.

So, yes, even for a fitness freak like Jagr, it’s likely that he’d probably not be the best fit for a team that plays at a frenetic pace. To get the most out of the living legend, a team would have to provide a nurturing environment. There are also questions about what sort of role he’d accept and how much money he’d settle for.

Even with all of those disclaimers under consideration, it’s maddening that we’re in late September and Jagr continues to put out semi-sarcastic cry for help videos.

So, what’s the latest on Jagr, then?

Well, to some extent, it’s useful to consider the process of elimination.

Sports-Express’ Igor Eronko reports that Jagr is open-minded about the KHL, though the NHL is first choice. Jagr acknowledged that participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics would be a draw in the process.

One thing he isn’t open to: a PTO with an NHL team.

While there’s actually some logic to a tryout – teams might want to see how well he can move/what kind of immediate chemistry Jagr could find – it does seem a little … demeaning to a first-ballot Hall of Famer who, frankly, is still producing solid numbers.

Eronko reports that Jagr said he’s talking to three-to-four teams, while Pierre LeBrun reports that two-to-three NHL teams are speaking with Jagr’s reps in the latest edition of TSN’s Insider Trading.

(Hey, both could be correct if Jagr’s including KHL suitors in his estimate.)

LeBrun also notes the idea Jagr is ruling out, beyond a PTO: retirement.

Jagr doesn’t want to hang up his skates, even if it means not playing in the NHL, which would bum out a slew of hockey fans (raises hand).

Naturally, there are creative “have your cake and eat it too” scenarios. Perhaps Jagr could sign a KHL contract with an NHL out clause of some kind, playing in the 2018 Winter Olympics, and then ink a deal with a contender who a) he wants to play for and b) is now convinced he still “has it?”

There are plenty of possibilities, and many of them are fun to think about.

Jagr needing to try out for a team – or worse, retire – is not so fun to think about.

Flyers experiment with Claude Giroux at LW, Sean Couturier as his center

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Last season, Claude Giroux and Sean Couturier were on the ice at the same time during even-strength situations for just a bit more than five minutes. Depending upon how a Philadelphia Flyers’ pre-season experiment goes, they could line up together a whole lot more often.

Of course, if you missed this post’s headline, you might be asking: “But how? They’re both centers.”

Well, under this experiment, Giroux would move to left wing, Couturier would play center, and Jakub Voracek would assume his familiar role at RW.

Giroux came into the NHL primarily as a right-winger before moving to center, so he’s clearly versatile enough to theoretically work out on a wing. It also might allow the Flyers to try to duplicate some of their mad science from the power play to even-strength, as that’s often the role he finds himself in on that locomotive of a man-advantage unit.

As Dave Isaac of the Courier-Post reports, Giroux doesn’t seem against it, really.

“It was actually a lot of fun,” Giroux said. “It’s not like I’m against it or I’m not happy with it. If it makes the team better, we have a lot of centermen and I’m up for it for sure.”

Giroux is right. The Flyers have a glut of pivots, especially if head coach Dave Hakstol views additions Nolan Patrick and Jori Lehtera (or fairly recent addition Valtteri Filppula) as better fits down the middle.

NHL.com’s Bill Meltzer reports that Hakstol is impressed by Giroux’s willingness to move around as need be.

“When your captain is as selfless as ‘G’ is, he [goes] all in,” Hakstol said. “Whatever the role is, he’s going to attack it… It’s early, but he’s had a very high-level camp.”

Giroux’s been, at times, a bit more dependent on the PP to get his numbers. In 2016-17, five of his 14 goals and 26 of his assists (31 of 58 points) came on the power play.

Perhaps Couturier could do the “dirty work” associated with a center while two gifted wingers exploit their chemistry and get to have the fun? It’s the sort of hypothesis that can make sense in a hockey laboratory, and it would be entertaining to see if it works out in reality.

Assuming such a scientific method even makes it to October.