Max Pacioretty

Montreal police open investigation on Zdeno Chara’s hit on Max Pacioretty


Zdeno Chara’s hit on Max Pacioretty has created a firestorm of debate over the past few days. When awful incidents like this occur, it’s normal for all sides to get their emotions wound up. One part of this whole situation that hasn’t gotten worked up is the real world effects that happen when a horribly violent incident occurs on the ice. That’s about to change now, however.

The Montreal Police Department is opening an investigation on Chara’s hit from Tuesday night.

Police said they are acting on a request by Quebec’s director of criminal and penal prosecutions, Louis Dionne. Police added that after evidence is collected it will then be determined if there are grounds for prosecution.

Hearing that the police have gotten involved in this may be just a way for them to cool off the locals in the city who have inundated their switchboards with calls to go after Chara, so much so they’ve asked people to stop calling them about the incident.

We’ve seen authorities get involved in past on-ice incidents. Marty McSorley’s stick-swinging attack on Donald Brashear in 2000, Todd Bertuzzi’s assault of Steve Moore in 2004, and Dino Ciccarelli’s attack on Luke Richardson in 1988 which earned him a night in jail all come to mind.

The difference with those incidents and this one, of course, all lie in the intent. As far as we can tell, Chara didn’t purposefully try to smash Pacioretty’s head into the stanchion that broke his neck and gave him a severe concussion. Of course, even accidental situations where someone is seriously injured can lead to a criminal investigation, this doesn’t appear to be one where any charges will ultimately be filed, however.

The one way this could be made into a more serious situation would be if Pacioretty were to press charges against Chara. Even though Pacioretty is understandably angry about what happened, it seems doubtful we’ll see things be taken that far.

Avs unveil new third jerseys

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The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled their new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

These new thirds won’t come as a huge shock, however. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

Colorado will debut its new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith