Detroit Red Wings v Phoenix Coyotes

Coyotes endgame in Glendale approaching? Winnipeg waits on deck

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Threats, law suits, insults, big money being thrown around. If you didn’t know better it sounds like the plot line to a new drama on network TV. Instead it’s just all a part of what’s going on lately in the ongoing saga of the Phoenix Coyotes, Matthew Hulsizer, the City of Glendale, and the Goldwater Institute.

If you’re not caught up on things, the watchdog group Goldwater Institute says they will sue the City of Glendale before they go through with a bond sale in order to raise the money they’re looking to give to prospective buyer Matthew Hulsizer control of the team and keep the Coyotes in Glendale. This means that if the sale is delayed the interest rate on the bonds go up thus making it a lot harder to pull it off, if at all.

Making matters more fun is the City of Glendale threatening a countersuit against the Goldwater Institute, a scare tactic that likely would keep the courts tied up for a long time and end up forcing the team to be sold to the highest bidder virtually regardless of where the new owner wanted to have the team play.

Today, the City of Glendale did not file paperwork to sue the Goldwater Institute. In this game of chicken, Goldwater stood firm while Glendale backed down as they knew they’d have to do. Glendale may still move to do that, but if matters get tied up in court while the NHL sweats out another financial loser of a season in Arizona (reported to be $40 million in losses just this season) there’s virtually no doubt the NHL Board of Governors will seek to sell the team to David Thomson and True North based out of Winnipeg.

As with everything having to do with this story, there’s a lot to believe and not believe with lots of heated opinions and angled takes on matters. Wading through the reports you get that are both pro-Glendale and pro-Winnipeg we can cut through to the heart of the matter and see that things appear to be at their darkest hour in the struggle to keep the Coyotes in Arizona.

After all, the Goldwater Institute’s contention is that the bond sale is an egregious misuse of public funds. They feel that  their job is to make sure the city doesn’t go bankrupt and lose out on basic civic functions to help pay off a millionaire to help him buy the team. It’s understandable that the fans in the desert would think the group is just acting like a bunch of spoil sports out to ruin their fun and chase away the Coyotes back to Winnipeg.

That said, there’s something to be said for a community of 250,000 people committing the initial $25 million earlier this year to pony up for the team’s potential losses and then another potential $100 million in the bond sale to keep a hockey team that has the second worst attendance in the NHL. While the city would expect that parking revenues would help them eventually get that money back, that’s like hoping a lottery ticket might pan out and win you money to help pay the bills in the future.

Making the reality of the situation look a little worse for Arizona is the projected revenue the team could see if they moved to Winnipeg. Yahoo’s Nicholas Cotsonika reported today that while NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly doesn’t think a Goldwater Institute law suit will hamper the sale, the amount of money to be made in Winnipeg would likely turn out to be more than what the Coyotes make in Glendale and even more than what the Thrashers make in Atlanta.

Take into consideration here that Winnipeg is the eighth largest market in Canada while Phoenix/Glendale is the 12th largest in the United States. The potential future home of the Coyotes, the MTS Centre in Winnipeg, would also be the NHL’s smallest venue with just over 15,000 seats. The NHL doesn’t want to be in a position to make more with less, they’d like to make more money with more fans but if the courts get factored into matters too heavily in the coming days and weeks in Arizona, Gary Bettman and the rest of the NHL might not have another choice than to sell the team to True North and send the Coyotes back to Winnipeg.

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.

Video: Orpik penalized after catching Maatta with late, high hit

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The Pittsburgh Penguins were without defenseman Olli Maatta for most of the first period of Game 2 after he was on the receiving end of a high, late hit from Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik.

The hit occurred early in the first period, well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck on a rush into the Washington zone.

Maatta, who nearly fell over as he tried to stand back up, was in obvious distress as he went to the dressing room. Orpik was given a minor penalty for interference on the play.