Penner makes Kings debut tonight

Barring any last minute visa issues, Dustin Penner is set to make his Los Angeles Kings debut tonight against the Phoenix Coyotes. Sure, the trade deadline was a huge letdown for TSN’s coverage hockey fans all over North America. Most teams chose to do their dealings in the weeks leading up to the deadline instead of the 11th hour. But for the Kings, they eventually got exactly what they needed and made the biggest splash on NHL’s Christmas Day.

The deal makes sense on multiple levels for the Kings. First and foremost, the team desperately needed to add a top 6 forward to help their goal-scoring woes. If they wanted to get picky, they’d preferably find a left wing that could score. If they wanted to get even pickier, they’d find a scoring left wing that had size to mesh with the rest of their team. So when they were able to acquire the big left wing in Edmonton with soft hands, it was like he was straight out of central casting.

There are plenty of reasons why the trade makes sense for the Kings beyond Penner’s style of play though. The Kings were able to acquire one of the major prizes on Deadline Day without giving up their prized prospect (Brayden Schenn) and also without giving up a player like Wayne Simmonds who is already playing a valuable role for the team.

Perhaps the best part for the Kings is he’s locked up for another season at a reasonable $4.5 million cap hit. By no means was this strictly a rental player acquired for 3 months. Dean Lombardi hit on the fact that he’s locked up for another year:

“I think (the extra year) helps. Obviously we were looking at that. Not only does it fit, in terms of the player and the need — obviously the left wing was kind of sticking out — but he’s locked in. Secondly, it’s not a cost-prohibitive contract. It doesn’t stop us from going out and being aggressive in the summer, for the right player. So it kind of fit for us, on a long-term basis too, in terms of what else we might be able to do.”

The Kings had the cap space and have a young team that is supposed to take the next step this year. Their recent 11-1-3 stretch (including 6-1-3 on a 10-game road trip) showed GM Dean Lombardi that this team could make waves if given a little help. After a quiet deadline last year and a failed Kovalchuk campaign in the offseason, Lombardi was finally able to bring in a piece to help the Kings try to get over the hump. Whether they are able to do it or not, we’ll soon find out.

With plenty of salary cap space, the green light from ownership to spend money, and a mandate from a starved fan base to do something, they acquired the best player on Deadline Day.

After his first day in Los Angeles, it’s apparent that both sides are happy with the deal. Here’s what Penner had to say about his new team:

“Now, the team, as a whole, is physical, they’re really good defensively, they have a lot of key pieces to make a run. They’re well coached, they have great goaltending. I really like what I see here, as far as the big bodies cycling the puck, playing down low.”

“A lot of offense comes from second and third chances, not just the one-and-done [chances]. With the people we have here, the skill we have on the defensive side of the puck to get it out [of the defensive zone] and keep it in [the offensive zone], it should be good.”

“I can’t wait to get started. The first game is Thursday. It’s a tight race in the Western Conference, as everybody knows. [The Coyotes are] a team that’s in the hunt, too. It should be intense, and it’ll be fun to be on the other side of it.”

Only time will tell what the Edmonton Oilers got out of the deal—but this was a deal the Kings had to make at this point in time. Whether it was Penner, (now injured) ex-teammate Ales Hemsky, David Booth or some other player, it was imperative for management to pick someone up to give the Kings (and their fans) a shot in the arm for the stretch run. They may lose in the first round again and they may make noise in the Western Conference playoffs, but the results won’t change the fact that the Kings made the move they had to make.

Of course, it would help silence any potential critics if they won a round or two this spring.

Wild extend captain Mikko Koivu’s contract for two years, $11M

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Minnesota Wild fans fearing that the 2017-18 season could be Mikko Koivu‘s last can breathe a sigh of relief, and that suspense didn’t even carry into opening night.

Instead, the Wild signed Koivu to a two-year contract extension worth $11 million.

That $5.5M cap hit kicks in during the 2018-19 campaign and ends after 2019-20. It represents a minor cut in pay for Koivu, as he’s entering the final year of a deal with a $6.75M cap hit.

Koivu, 34, enjoyed a strong first season under Bruce Boudreau, becoming a Selke finalist for the first time in his underrated career. He’s been Minnesota’s captain since 2008-09.

Koivu’s deal would qualify as a 35+ contract, according to Cap Friendly.

The Finnish forward likely valued stability, maybe taking a little less in AAV for the sake of peace of mind.

This continues a busy week-or-so for the Wild, who also broke their impasse with RFA Marcus Foligno by handing him a four-year, $11.5M deal.

Opinion: this Koivu deal is a much, much easier decision to justify, even taking into account his advanced age.

Predators captain announcement looming; they have some great options

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Multiple reporters* indicate that the Nashville Predators will name their captain (and alternates) on Wednesday.

Mike Fisher briefly held the title, and before him, Shea Weber wore the “C.” Both were safe, obvious choices; this time around, there are some intriguing options. The Tennessean’s Adam Vignan reports that the Predators themselves realize that there are quite a few logical captains in their midst (which probably isn’t a bad problem to have).

“It’s totally different this time around,” Pekka Rinne said. “I think Mike last year, I think everybody saw that coming. Everybody agreed. Everybody was really comfortable with it. I think now we have, in my opinion, at least four great options to choose from.”

Note: the Predators would be wise not to pull a Canucks with Roberto Luongo as captain experiment, even if Rinne’s easily one of the team’s leaders.

Some of the most obvious options include young-yet-veteran defenseman Roman Josi, big-dollar-center Ryan Johansen, and star blueliner P.K. Subban.

(Honestly, though, it’s difficult to imagine Subban wearing the “C” after all the weird, Listerine-scented stuff with the media happened during the 2017 Stanley Cup Final.)

As strong as those options are, it sure feels like Josi is the favorite, especially since he’s been around longer than Subban, Johansen, and Viktor Arvidsson.

Vegas oddmakers agree:

And so do reporters covering the team on a day-to-day basis:

One moment of devil’s advocacy, though: Subban, Johansen, Arvidsson, Filip Forsberg, and Mattias Ekholm all have more term on their contracts than Josi, who is a bargain at $4M for three more seasons.

OK, that’s kind of a weak argument, but hey … sometimes it’s a pain to have to deal with captain questions so often, and you never know if the team might determine that Josi is expendable, considering their deep war chest on the blueline.

Nah, Josi’s probably the easy and correct choice. Right?

* – Including Cory Curtis of WKRN-TV and Justin Bradford of 102.5 The Game.

Duchene dusts off ‘one day at a time’ for Avalanche trade questions

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The Denver Post’s Mike Chambers posted an exclusive video interview with Matt Duchene, who was verbose …

… Compared to the terse statement he provided, without questions, last week regarding what must seem to him like ubiquitous Colorado Avalanche trade rumors.

Check out Duchene’s comments in the video below, which seem to mix saying a lot of the right things – and finding a new way to use the “one day at a time” cliche – with a little bit of edge that makes you wonder how well he’ll contain his frustration in other situations.

How often will he be available for such questioning on the road, particularly in big media markets and/or around reporters covering teams who’ve long been connected to Duchene?

Either way, Chambers’ video is another reminder that, for all the times people roll their eyes at canned responses during press conferences and locker-room interviews, reporters can get less-guarded moments where you can parse out greater truths.

(And, hey, it’s nice to give Duchene a chance to make faces that seem a little less … depressed?)

Chambers transcribes an especially intriguing part at the end of the interview (click here for more transcriptions from Chambers at the Denver Post, if video isn’t an option or your preference).

What if he’s not traded? “I’m not looking that far (ahead),” he said. “I’m taking one day at a time.”

Hmm, interesting, right?

/Refreshes the #FreeDuchene hashtag.

Kings’ power play – with Toffoli on point – is latest nod to modern NHL

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Considering how well the Darryl Sutter-coached Los Angeles Kings hogged the puck, there was a sense that he yielded as much as one could expect from a talented, but aging roster.

With a new regime in the front office (from GM Rob Blake to assistant-turned-head-coach John Stevens), there’s at least one interesting test taking place: what if modern tactics were applied to a Kings team that, structurally, often felt like a “throwback” team?

(Again, to Sutter’s credit, that throwback style worked very well at times.)

LA Kings Insider’s Jon Rosen reports that the Kings are embracing the modern approach that sometimes scares off more conservative coaches: going with four forwards and one defenseman on a power play.

Rosen reports that the team rolled with Michael Cammalleri, Anze Kopitar, Jeff Carter, Tyler Toffoli, and Drew Doughty on their top unit. In that alignment, Toffoli joined Doughty on the points.

The puck movement drew praise from Rosen:

There was ample movement; such positioning didn’t always remain that way. Toffoli drifted lower towards the half wall, and Doughty often was found straight away, at the top of the key. The plan? More one-time opportunities from high-danger areas closer to the net.

Of course, it’s important to note that it’s September, and the Kings could go a different way once the games count in the standings.

Even if their philosophy stays the same, injuries could force personnel changes. Then again, this alignment leaves a talented forward like Tanner Pearson off the top unit, so it’s plausible that this 4F-1D combo could weather a storm or two. Pearson could also nudge his way in if the Kings believe they need a better balance of left and right-handed shots (and so on).

Checking Left Wing Lock’s listings, it’s clear that his is quite the departure, as the Kings rolled with Doughty plus either Jake Muzzin or Alec Martinez in most instances last season.

Los Angeles fell in the middle of the power-play pack in 2016-17; their 19.1 percent rate of success ranked 15th, while their 46 power-play goals tied for 16th in the NHL. They only allowed three shorthanded goals, so for those other numbers to climb, they might have to stomach more risk.

When you ponder how much the Kings struggle to score at times, it might be worth it.

For more on the pros and cons of putting a forward on the point, check out Matt Cane’s 2015 bit for Hockey Graphs.