Eric Goddard, Donald Brashear

Catching up with former NHL enforcer Donald Brashear


When you ask hockey fans to name the most fearsome enforcers of the last decade, it’s likely that Donald Brashear would be among the first names mentioned. Yet with enforcers becoming less and less prevalent in the NHL, it seems silly for a professional team to waste $1.4 million of cap space on a guy who doesn’t do anything with his hands but throw punches.

So Brashear found himself shuffled around the depths of the New York Rangers and Atlanta Thrashers’ minor league systems the last two seasons, often being paid handsomely to not play hockey.

Jeff Z. Klein of the New York Times caught up with the fading enforcer in the LNAH (Ligue Nord-Américaine de Hockey), an obscure semipro league inhabited almost entirely by French-speaking players who squeeze 44-game seasons into their lives as they work day jobs. Apparently a point-per-game player in the marginal league, Brashear says he still enjoys being one of the guys and is happy to fight far less frequently. (Although that story included video of an ugly LNAH incident in which Brashear more or less loses his mind.)

The most interesting part of the article revolves around Brashear reflecting on his final seasons and the changing landscape in the NHL.

Q. Your last year, with the Rangers [36 games, 0 goals, 1 assist, minus-9, 73 penalty minutes, 13 fights, 6:15 average ice time], did that go well?

A. Not at all. At some point the role I had to fulfill wasn’t — I didn’t like it anymore. It was more like, “Just get on the ice and fight.” When I met with the coach in the summer before, he was telling me I was going to have all sorts of ice time, but he never gave it to me.

Fighting is not a big part of the game in the N.H.L. right now. If there’s fighting it’s more the middleweight guys. I feel like I played at the right time, and they decided to change the rules, and it was toward the end of my career. I tried to make it last. It was good, and now it’s over.

Read the rest of the interview here.

In Jets return, Burmistrov delivers headshot to Bergeron (Updated)

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Didn’t take long for Alex Burmistrov to make his presence felt — though not in a good way.

Burmistrov, playing in his first game for the Jets after a two-year stint in Russia, delivered a questionable elbow to the head of Boston’s Patrice Bergeron late in the first period of Thursday’s season-opener:

Burmistrov received a two-minute minor for an illegal check to the head, while Bergeron received a matching minor for roughing (retaliating for the elbow, specifically).

The Bruins went into the intermission leading 1-0, and have yet to update Bergeron’s status.

Update: Bergeron stayed in the game, but B’s head coach Claude Julien was none too pleased with the hit. Following the game, he called for the NHL’s Department of Player Safety to look at it…

Two-for-two: Another successful coach’s challenge as Sens reverse Kane’s goal

Dave Cameron
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Coaches are quickly getting the hang of this challenge thing.

Following Mike Babcock’s successful challenge in Toronto’s opening-night loss to Montreal on Wednesday, Babcock’s provincial rival — Sens head coach Dave Cameron — got it right as well, successfully reversing Evander Kane‘s would-be equalizer in the third period.

From the league:

At 10:34 of the third period in the Senators/Sabres game, Ottawa requested a Coach’s Challenge to review whether Buffalo was off-side prior to Evander Kane’s goal.

After reviewing all available replays and consulting with NHL Hockey Operations staff, the Linesman determined that Buffalo’s Zemgus Girgensons was off-side prior to the goal. According to Rule 78.7, “The standard for overturning the call in the event of a ‘GOAL’ call on the ice is that the Linesman, after reviewing any and all available replays and consulting with the Toronto Video Room, determines that one or more Players on the attacking team preceded the puck into the attacking zone prior to the goal being scored and that, as a result, the play should have been stopped for an “Off-side” infraction; where this standard is met, the goal will be disallowed.”

Therefore the original call is overturned – no goal Buffalo Sabres.

The clock is re-set to show 9:32 (10:28 elapsed time), when the off-side infraction occurred.

As the league later noted, this was the first coach’s challenge under the offside scenario.