Chris Stewart

Riding the Zamboni – Saturday, February 19th

St Louis 9, Anaheim 3

The game actually started out pretty well for the Ducks as they jumped out to a 2-0 lead. Unfortunately for Randy Carlyle’s crew, they were blasted 9-1 over the rest of the game. In their two visits to the Scottrade Center in St. Louis, the Ducks have now been outscored 14-4. One positive the Ducks could take from the game is that they only gave up 25 shots on goal. Of course, the negative is that they couldn’t find a goalie to stop any of them.

The Blues must have been happy about their newly reconstructed team’s ability to fill up the net. Their current 3-game winning streak finds them only 5 points out of the final playoff spot with games-in-hand on every single team they’re chasing. Newcomers Chris Stewart (2 goals) and Kevin Shattenkirk (1 assist) are supposed to help the team improve on their 26th ranked offense. Scoring 9 goals in a game is a good start.

Phoenix 3, Nashville 2

The Coyotes walked into Bridgestone Arena, scored a couple of quick goals in the 2nd period, and held on to earn their 7th win in a row. The close nature of the game shouldn’t have come as much of a surprise as this is their 6th one-goal victory during their recent run. But if you ask Dave Tippett, his Coyotes are playing exactly the type of style they need to if they want to be successful.

The Predators bench was also happy with the effort, if not with the result. But more important than the scoreboard is the status of their Olympic defenseman Ryan Suter. He left the ice at the end of the 2nd period with an undisclosed “upper body injury” and did not return to the ice. That’s a loss that could hurt much more than a simple L in the standings.

San Jose 4, Colorado 0

If the St. Louis Blues showed us how well the immediate returns of a blockbuster deal can be, the Colorado Avalanche showed us that things don’t always turn around so quickly. Fresh off making headlines by trading their best power forward and best young defenseman, the Avs fell flat on their faces on the ice.

It was also the first game for a new Sharks acquisition, as well: Ian White. But while fans might have been watching to see how White would fit in, it was Devin Setoguchi and his hat trick that stole the show.

Vancouver 5, Dallas 2

There were brief technical difficulties during the Stars’ broadcast. Clearly, they had nothing to do with the Canucks offense. The league’s #1 team continued to steamroll everyone in their path even though they’re playing with a Manitoba Moose defensive corps. At this rate, the NHL might want to think about having the Canucks play with 4 players at a time.

The game wasn’t as ugly as the final score would suggest. The Canucks held a slim 3-2 lead with 5 minutes to go, but scored two quick goals to blow it open at the end. The loss dropped the Stars to 1-7-1 since the All-Star break.

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    P.K. Subban takes Canada 2016 World Cup ‘snub’ in stride

    ANAHEIM, CA - MARCH 02:  P.K. Subban #76 of the Montreal Canadiens looks on during a game against the Anaheim Ducks at Honda Center on March 2, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
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    Just about any contending hockey nation will force some “snubs” heading into the 2016 World Cup of Hockey. Snubs feel especially inevitable for Canada, though.

    P.K. Subban has taken some confidence hits, relative to his abilities, when it comes to international play. Maybe that explains why he essentially shrugged off not making the team, as Sportsnet notes.

    “I mean, everybody wants to make the team, right? And there’s a bunch of guys that I’m sure wanted to be on the team. But that’s the way it goes,” Subban said. “Listen, at the end of the day, we could take four or five teams to this thing. When I was speaking to [Team Canada GM] Doug Armstrong, my number one thing was I just want to see Canada win gold. So, I’ll be there cheering just like everybody else.”

    Let’s face it, it’s probably pretty easy for Subban.

    He’s super-rich, generally beloved and has a gold medal to his name. That probably makes it easier to shake off a snub.

    That said, he also brings up a fun idea. If the Team North America idea runs out of steam, wouldn’t it be fun to watch Canada A vs. Canada B, or something of that nature?

    Hey, if you’re bored, feel free to fantasy draft a second Canadian team for such a scenario. Or, you know, each a sandwich instead.

    In other Subban news, he had fun with the Toronto Blue Jays:

    Should Lightning trade Bishop and hand the torch to Vasilevskiy?

    CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 08:  Ben Bishop #30 celebrates with Andrei Vasilevskiy #88 of the Tampa Bay Lightning after defeating the Chicago Blackhawks 3-2 in Game Three of the 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final at the United Center on June 8, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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    Erik Erlendsson poses what may seem like a bold question on Hockey Buzz: should the Tampa Bay Lightning hand the reins to Andrei Vasilevskiy by trading Ben Bishop?

    Erlendsson points to these comments made by Lightning GM Steve Yzerman, with the last sentence likely being most pertinent:

    “I think we’re in a fantastic position,” Yzerman said. “We have two outstanding goaltenders, based on what we’ve seen from Andrei both last year and this year and in particular, him coming in in the Pittsburgh series, I think we have a brilliant young goaltender and a proven, I don’t even want to call Bish a veteran because he’s still relatively young in terms of years played and games played, but we’ve got two outstanding goaltenders. I know that at some point, when that is, we may for expansion or cap reasons, have to make a decision.”

    Yes, at some point Yzerman would be forced to make a decision. Assuming an extension doesn’t come early, both Bishop’s $5.95 million cap hit and Vasilevskiy’s rookie deal ($925K cap hit) will expire after 2016-17.

    One would think that this would be the fork in the road moment … but what if Yzerman decides to be proactive and trade Bishop now?

    Stevie Y has plenty on his plate with new deals needed for Steven Stamkos, Nikita Kucherov and Jonathan Drouin.

    Still, this is expected to be an expensive offseason, whether it’s literal (locking all or more of those big pieces) or more figurative (possibly losing franchise player Stamkos). As great as Bishop has been, his near-$6 million could go toward locking down those pieces, especially if management already expects Vasilevskiy to be The Guy.

    Granted, the Lightning have seen firsthand how crucial it can be to have two starting-quality goalies (at least for however long you can hold onto them).

    Quite a conundrum, right?

    If nothing else, it’s a point to consider, even while acknowledging Bishop’s strong work.

    More on the Lightning off-season

    Steven Stamkos on the situation

    The Bolts want to bring back Jonathan Drouin

    Subtle but effective offseason pushed Sharks to next level

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    SAN JOSE, Calif. — After watching the San Jose Sharks miss the playoffs for the first time in more than a decade, general manager Doug Wilson set out to remake the team last offseason.

    Individually, none of the moves sent shockwaves through the NHL. The Sharks hired a coach who made the playoffs once in seven seasons as an NHL coach, traded a first-round pick for a goalie who had been a backup his entire career, added two playoff-tested veterans for depth at forward and defense and signed an unheralded Finnish rookie.

    Together, the additions of Peter DeBoer, Martin Jones, Joel Ward, Paul Martin and Joonas Donskoi to a solid core that had underachieved proved to be the right mix to get the Sharks to their long-awaited first Stanley Cup Final appearance.

    “I thought this team has a lot of the pieces of that puzzle,” Martin said. “Doug did a great job bringing guys in that he did, to make that push for it. I don’t think many people would have guessed that we’d be here right now, but I think we believed.”

    The players all said the disappointment of blowing a 3-0 series lead to Los Angeles in 2014 and then missing the playoffs entirely last season served as fuel for this season’s success.

    DeBoer also credited former coach Todd McLellan for helping put the foundation in place that he was able to capitalize on. The Sharks became the second team in the past 10 seasons to make it to the final after missing the playoffs the previous season, joining the 2011-12 Devils that pulled off the same trick in DeBoer’s first season in New Jersey.

    “Everyone was ready for something a little bit fresher and newer, not anything that much different,” DeBoer said. “The additions that Doug made, it just came together. I inherited a similar team in New Jersey when I went in there. First time they missed the playoffs for a long time the year before I got there. I think when you go into that situation, when you have really good people like there was in New Jersey when I went in there, like I was with this group … they’re embarrassed by the year they just had, and they’re willing to do and buy into whatever you’re selling to get it fixed again. I think I was the benefactor of that.”

    The transition from McLellan to DeBoer wasn’t seamless. As late as Jan. 8, the Sharks were in 13th place in the 14-team Western Conference and seemingly on the way to another missed postseason.

    But with Logan Couture finally healthy after being slowed by a broken leg early in the season and the move by DeBoer to put Tomas Hertl on the top line with Joe Thornton and Joe Pavelski, the Sharks rolled after that and made the playoffs as the third-place team in the Pacific Division.

    In-season additions of players like depth forwards Dainius Zubrus and Nick Spaling, physical defenseman Roman Polak and backup goaltender James Reimer helped put the Sharks in the position they are now.

    “With the new coaching staff we needed to realize how we needed to play to win,” Thornton said. “Once that clicked, and that probably clicked maybe early December, I think after that, we just exploded. I think that’s really when we saw the depth of this team. Everybody plays a big part.”

    That has been especially true in the playoffs when longtime core players like Thornton, Couture, Joe Pavelski and Patrick Marleau got the support that had often been lacking during past postseason disappointments.

    Jones has posted three shutouts in the playoffs, including the Game 7 second-round clincher against Nashville and back-to-back games in the conference final against St. Louis. He has proven more than capable of being an NHL starter after serving an apprenticeship as Jonathan Quick‘s backup in Los Angeles.

    Ward scored two goals in each of the final two games of the conference final and has 11 points this postseason. Donskoi exceeded expectations just to make the team as a rookie and has solidified his spot on the second line with five goals and nine points.

    Martin’s steady play has allowed offensive-minded defenseman Brent Burns to roam at times and given San Jose a strong second defensive pair that had been missing in previous seasons.

    Zubrus and Spaling played a big role as penalty killers and on the fourth line, while Polak has been one of the team’s most physical players.

    “Doug did a great job this summer, this season,” Couture said. “A lot of credit needs to go to him for the guys he brought in.”

    Shattenkirk on Blues trading him: ‘That’s out of my hands’

    ST LOUIS, MO - MAY 23:  Kevin Shattenkirk #22 of the St. Louis Blues skates against the San Jose Sharks in Game Five of the Western Conference Final during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Scottrade Center on May 23, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
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    In a vacuum, it’s confounding to imagine the St. Louis Blues trading Kevin Shattenkirk.

    He’s a highly productive defenseman in the meat of his prime at 27, and his cap hit is a super-bargain at $4.25 million.

    Of course, as is the case with many of the NHL’s biggest steals, the Blues will eventually need to pay up. In Shattenkirk’s case, his bargain deal ends after the 2016-17 season.

    That’s a tough enough conundrum on its own, but consider the deals on the Blues’ cap that also expire after next season.

    Now, there are also some areas of relief; some will be happy to see the Blues part ways with Patrik Berglund‘s $3.7 million cap hit (unless he plays out of his mind, naturally).

    There are also some other things to consider.

    A) What if the salary cap rises more than one might expect for 2017-18?

    B) Would expansion help the Blues cut a little fat by losing a less-than-ideal contract?

    C) Who are the Blues bringing back from this off-season?

    Item C) dovetails with Shattenkirk. Will the Blues try to bring back David Backes and/or Troy Brouwer, possibly squeezing out Shattenirk?

    There have been rumors about Shattenkirk being shopped around in the past, yet the summer is a great time to make deals. Teams get salary cap leeway, owners may want reboots and new coaches could really value Shattenkirk’s in-demand skills.

    For what it’s worth, Shattenkirk would prefer to stay:

    There’s a strong chance that Blues GM Doug Armstrong may bide his time, whether he’s inclined to trade Shattenkirk during the season or re-sign him.

    Still, the talented defenseman’s situation shows that the Blues have big decisions to make even regarding situations that do not technically demand immediate choices.

    One thing seems certain: it won’t be any easy call.

    Related

    Blues face tough questions

    David Backes wants to stay

    So does Troy Brouwer