Boston Bruins v Philadelphia Flyers

Did the Bruins make a mistake by ‘rushing’ Tyler Seguin to NHL level?

1 Comment

One of the dirty tricks in the NHL ’11 fantasy draft is to take Tyler Seguin and Taylor Hall in the late rounds, stash them at the junior level for a year or two, then take advantage of their dirt-cheap entry-level deals when the two players have improved dramatically. Of course, in reality, there is no “potential rating” to ensure that some raw prospect will turn into a future star.

Yet in a climate in which high-end draft picks often make a seamless (but sometimes desperation-tinged) transition from the draft to the NHL, the Boston Bruins had an interesting opportunity with Seguin. The B’s could have allowed the second overall pick of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft to marinate in the OHL for some more time, giving him the chance to (maybe?) build up a little size and mature further.

Instead, the Bruins made the somewhat-understandable decision for him to begin the 2010-11 season at the highest level and kept him there when it came time to decide if they wanted to burn one of his entry-level seasons.

Obviously, hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but the experiment hasn’t been a resounding success. Seguin has been a fairly frequent healthy scratch lately and isn’t lighting up the scoreboard when he is on the ice; his nine goals and 18 points aren’t likely to make the Toronto Maple Leafs green with envy.

Yet there are plenty of examples of high profile rookies struggling in their initial seasons. The disturbing part, though, is that Seguin isn’t getting the kind of opportunity to learn from his mistakes and occasional breakthroughs like Steven Stamkos, John Tavares and others did. That’s because his average ice time is only 12:20 per game.

It begs the question: did the Bruins rush him to the NHL amid the excitement of pulling a fast one on the Leafs? Could he be “a cautionary tale” for teams who might want to be a little more careful about expediting the development of smaller players?

Tom Wakefield of Canucks Hockey Blog brings up an interesting comparison between the hectic development of Seguin vs. the patient and productive process between the Anaheim Ducks and Bobby Ryan (another second overall pick).

Ryan played two more years in junior hockey, posting seasons of 95 and 102 points, before he got his professional feet wet with the Portland Pirates, the Ducks AHL affiliate in 2007. Ryan then spent the 2007-08 season on the bus between Portland and Anaheim, his “slowed” development a result of poor conditioning (reportedly 17% body fat) and foot speed that was not NHL-level.

Today, Bobby Ryan is a core member of the Ducks, on his way to his third-straight 30-goal season. The Ducks took their time with his development, and along the way Ryan learned what it took to compete and succeed at the game’s highest level.

Looking at how Tyler Seguin’s rookie season has gone (8 goals, 9 assists, 12:18 minutes a game. frequent healthy scratch), one can’t help but wonder if the Boston Bruins should have been more patient with him.

Instead of dominating junior hockey and being the go-to guy on his junior team (and most likely a leader on Team Canada at the World Juniors this past winter), Seguin’s an afterthought in the Bruin line-up.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that Seguin’s situation is a disaster. It’s FAR too early to give up on him. The only question is whether the Bruins would have been wiser to keep him in the juniors for another year or two. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

(H/T to Buzzing the Net.)

Video: Kings, Kopitar exploit Edler’s gaffe for OT win vs. Canucks

Leave a comment

Alexander Edler probably feels some serious shame right now.

The Vancouver Canucks defenseman is getting some heat for a bad blunder on what became the Los Angeles Kings’ overtime game-winning goal by Anze Kopitar.

You can see the decisive goal in the video above, which meant a 2-1 overtime victory for the Kings over the Canucks.

Just a (safe for work) sampling of the reactions toward Edler:

Again, those are the more … sanitized reactions.

Jacob Markstrom didn’t get the win despite keeping Vancouver in the game. The big Swede made 38 out of 40 saves, yet that last goal will burn.

For Los Angeles, it’s another reminder that this team sure is scrappy.

Let’s be honest: it’s better to go late into a game with a lead against the Kings, but a small margin makes for some serious discomfort.

Malkin, Kessel dominate as Pens stump Sharks

1 Comment

Sometimes an angry Evgeni Malkin means a stray power play or two for his opponents, but it’s usually not the best idea to make him angry.

Giving a player that big and talented extra motivation just seems like a bad idea, right?

Joel Ward experienced that phenomenon on Tuesday, as Malkin responded to a blow from Ward with the goal you can see below.

Malkin scored a goal and two assists while Phil Kessel found the net twice in Pittsburgh’s 5-1 win against the San Jose Sharks on Tuesday.

Malkin now has a four-game goal streak going (five goals, three assists). He also has 13 points in his past seven games.

Marc-Andre Fleury deserves plenty of credit, too, as he stopped 33 out of 34 shots and continues to quietly generate some of the best work of his sometimes-polarizing career.

This was a nice way for the Penguins to begin a four-game Western road trip, although they’ll need to wait a while to try to keep it going; their next game comes in Los Angeles on Saturday.

Of course: Ryan Suter wins it for Wild vs. ‘Hawks after those wild quotes

NBCSN screen

You know what they say: “What a difference a game makes.”

Even in the 82-game marathon that an NHL regular season is, that can be true.

Ryan Suter admitted he went too far with comments during tough times, yet there he was on Tuesday night, grinning ear-to-ear after scoring the 2-1 goal that ended up being the game-winner.

Heck, people were even joking about things. The healing powers of winning, right?

As of this writing, this win places Minnesota in the last wild card spot, and they’re close to elbowing in on the Chicago Blackhawks (who own a standings point advantage, but have played two more games so far in 2015-16).

Jeremy Roenick labels this 2-1 win as a “team win” for Minnesota, and it showed on that 2-1 goal, as the Wild showed off some picture-perfect passing and a willingness to crash the net for rebounds.

Let’s face it, though; Devan Dubnyk deserves plenty of credit, too.

It won’t be easy in the Central Division, and things may get heated again. Still, this is the sort of win that may just help Minnesota build up some confidence.

Hey look: Flyers reel off three straight wins for first time in 2015-16

Sean Couturier
Leave a comment

When you’re talking about bright sides, most people believe that they boil down to the light at the end of the tunnel for the Philadelphia Flyers.

Sometimes it’s nice to enjoy a little success in the present while waiting for that bright future, though.

The Flyers are providing at least a burst of sunshine lately, as Tuesday’s 4-2 win against the Ottawa Senators gives them … (drum roll) their first three-game winning streak of this season.

Joy abounded.

Even in recent darker moments, Philly’s been pretty impressive on offense, so Flyers fans are likely relieved to see a relative offensive outburst.

Sure, it wasn’t all rainbows and unicorns – Radko Gudas might have gotten himself into some trouble, for instance – yet this is still a nice sign of life for a team expected to finish in the draft lottery.

If that fails … hey, the future may require shades.