Did the Bruins make a mistake by ‘rushing’ Tyler Seguin to NHL level?

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One of the dirty tricks in the NHL ’11 fantasy draft is to take Tyler Seguin and Taylor Hall in the late rounds, stash them at the junior level for a year or two, then take advantage of their dirt-cheap entry-level deals when the two players have improved dramatically. Of course, in reality, there is no “potential rating” to ensure that some raw prospect will turn into a future star.

Yet in a climate in which high-end draft picks often make a seamless (but sometimes desperation-tinged) transition from the draft to the NHL, the Boston Bruins had an interesting opportunity with Seguin. The B’s could have allowed the second overall pick of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft to marinate in the OHL for some more time, giving him the chance to (maybe?) build up a little size and mature further.

Instead, the Bruins made the somewhat-understandable decision for him to begin the 2010-11 season at the highest level and kept him there when it came time to decide if they wanted to burn one of his entry-level seasons.

Obviously, hindsight is 20/20 and all that, but the experiment hasn’t been a resounding success. Seguin has been a fairly frequent healthy scratch lately and isn’t lighting up the scoreboard when he is on the ice; his nine goals and 18 points aren’t likely to make the Toronto Maple Leafs green with envy.

Yet there are plenty of examples of high profile rookies struggling in their initial seasons. The disturbing part, though, is that Seguin isn’t getting the kind of opportunity to learn from his mistakes and occasional breakthroughs like Steven Stamkos, John Tavares and others did. That’s because his average ice time is only 12:20 per game.

It begs the question: did the Bruins rush him to the NHL amid the excitement of pulling a fast one on the Leafs? Could he be “a cautionary tale” for teams who might want to be a little more careful about expediting the development of smaller players?

Tom Wakefield of Canucks Hockey Blog brings up an interesting comparison between the hectic development of Seguin vs. the patient and productive process between the Anaheim Ducks and Bobby Ryan (another second overall pick).

Ryan played two more years in junior hockey, posting seasons of 95 and 102 points, before he got his professional feet wet with the Portland Pirates, the Ducks AHL affiliate in 2007. Ryan then spent the 2007-08 season on the bus between Portland and Anaheim, his “slowed” development a result of poor conditioning (reportedly 17% body fat) and foot speed that was not NHL-level.

Today, Bobby Ryan is a core member of the Ducks, on his way to his third-straight 30-goal season. The Ducks took their time with his development, and along the way Ryan learned what it took to compete and succeed at the game’s highest level.

Looking at how Tyler Seguin’s rookie season has gone (8 goals, 9 assists, 12:18 minutes a game. frequent healthy scratch), one can’t help but wonder if the Boston Bruins should have been more patient with him.

Instead of dominating junior hockey and being the go-to guy on his junior team (and most likely a leader on Team Canada at the World Juniors this past winter), Seguin’s an afterthought in the Bruin line-up.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that Seguin’s situation is a disaster. It’s FAR too early to give up on him. The only question is whether the Bruins would have been wiser to keep him in the juniors for another year or two. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

(H/T to Buzzing the Net.)

This fight between Tom Wilson, Chris Stewart got downright gory (Video)

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For those who decry the decline in fighting – in “blood and guts” hockey – Tuesday presented a bloody moment, one fairly high on this season’s Muta scale.

If there’s something maybe a little off-kilter about you, seeing it happen to Tom Wilson may provide an additional pleasure.

Anyway, as you can see in the video above, Minnesota Wild winger Chris Stewart bloodied the Washington Capitals pest in a fight. Whether you’re for, against or neutral toward Wilson, it’s quite the sight.

Wilson may be hurt, by the way. He missed some time but returned later in the contest.

Milestones: Matthews, Nylander break Leafs rookie records; Chara hits 600

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Auston Matthews likely ranks as the top reason that many Toronto Maple Leafs are starting to get the same feelings they had in better times, so it only makes sense that he broke a beloved Buds’ record on Tuesday.

With his 35th goal of a potential Calder season – but a brilliant debut either way – Matthews passed Wendel Clark for the Maple Leafs’ rookie record for goals in a season.

That goal was also meaningful for William Nylander, as he extended his point streak to 12 games with an assist. This team, fueled by young players, just keeps shattering first-year marks:

Switching gears, let’s go from new to (relatively) old: Zdeno Chara collected the 600th point of his outstanding career with an assist:

Yes, it’s true that most people think of his imposing size and all-world defensive instincts in praising Chara, but he’s been a respectable point producer, too.

U.S. women end boycott, will represent USA Hockey at worlds

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The U.S. women’s national team voted in favor of accepting USA Hockey’s deal, so they’ll participate in the world championship tournament. USA Hockey recently made the news official with this press release.

The press release confirmed a report that the contract will last four years, while financial terms were kept confidential. (Team members had been seeking a living wage to represent USA Hockey.)

“Our sport is the big winner today,” Team captain Meghan Duggan said. “We stood up for what we thought was right and USA Hockey’s leadership listened. In the end, both sides came together. I’m proud of my teammates and can’t thank everyone who supported us enough. It’s time now to turn the page. We can’t wait to play in the World Championship later this week in front of our fans as we try and defend our gold medal.”

The U.S. women’s national team is scheduled to face Canada on Friday.

Here’s a screen cap of the press release for your convenience:

Logan Couture can at least speak and eat following horrifying mouth injury

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As much as many of us suffer during a trip to the dentist, few can fathom the horrors hockey players often go through when a puck, stick or fist finds their teeth/mouths. Consult this vintage PHT post from 2010 if you want to cringe, a lot.

Much like Eddie Lack “only” dealing with a neck sprain, it’s strange to be heartened to hear that Logan Couture can speak and eat after his own painful ordeal, but that’s the positive update from the Mercury News on Tuesday.

Couture, Wilson said, did not need to have his jaw wired shut after a deflected puck caught him in the mouth on Saturday when the Sharks played the Nashville Predators.

“Hey, he can speak and eat … and his jaw isn’t wired shut!” Yeesh.

To little surprise, Couture isn’t playing on Tuesday. As far as the Sharks next three games (Thursday, Friday and Sunday), that remains to be seen.

As an aside, consider this: on the same day Jonathan Drouin‘s celebrating his birthday after helping the Lightning win, Couture is lucky if he can force down some birthday cake. Life: it isn’t always fair.

PHT discussed his trip to the dentist on Monday.

More mouth pain: When David Backes felt like his face was falling off.