Gary Bettman

Gary Bettman, NHL Board of Governors discuss hits to the head, concussions

Concussions aren’t an issue that will go away over night. Even a significant rule change won’t curb them altogether, as the speed of the game and size of the players mean that there’s a certain amount of injuries that can be deemed a part of the sport.

That being said, the NHL should still do whatever it can to limit such injuries. A big part of stemming the tide is open communication and compiling information, so it’s no surprise that head injuries were a big topic of discussion at the NHL Board of Governors Meeting during this All-Star weekend.

Gary Bettman addressed the meetings and the league’s findings on such hits. Of course, he didn’t provide actual numbers on the issue to the media, so to some extent he could write his own narrative during the press conference.

So keeping in mind that he didn’t give concrete information, Bettman admitted that concussions increased this season but claimed that blindside hits are down. The NHL’s commissioner says that accidental hits have gone up substantially in 2010-11.

“It appears, and again I want to emphasize that it is a preliminary, the increase in concussions appear to be in the area of accidental and inadvertent situations as most did not involve any contact with the victim’s head by an opponent,” Bettman said prior to the Honda SuperSkills competition at the RBC Center on Saturday. “I’m not saying no concussions came from hits to the head, but it appears the increase is coming from somewhere else.”

Bettman said most of the concussions being analyzed this season are a result from when players collide with each other or when they “were hit legally and without head contact after which their heads have struck either the ice, the boards or the glass.”

He said that these accidental hits that cause concussions have increased man-games lost threefold.

Bettman, though, stressed that the new rule (Rule 48) that renders illegal any lateral or blindside hits where the head is the principal area of target has resulted in fewer concussions caused by blindside hits this season.

Brian Burke said that Sidney Crosby’s concussion dictated the focus on head injuries, stating that it wouldn’t be such a hot topic if Maple Leafs plugger Mike Brown was the biggest name dealing with such issues. While I agree that Crosby’s problems shined a harsh light on concussions, it’s silly to ignore the fact that head injuries are the focus of discussions in nearly every major sport – even “less violent” ones such as soccer and baseball.

Obviously this is far from the last we’ll hear of concussions, so we’ll let you know when/if big changes take place. In the mean time, take a look at video of Bettman’s press conference.

Kane scores OT-winner, caps Islanders’ bumpy start in Brooklyn

Patrick Kane

On paper, it’s the perfect way to kick off meaningful hockey in Brooklyn, as the New York Islanders faced the defending champion Chicago Blackhawks on Friday.

In reality, there were some highs and lows, culminating with Patrick Kane scoring a power-play overtime-winner to give Chicago a 3-2 (OT) win.

The Barclays Center crowd was going to be a big part of the story one way or another, but even by building-opening standards, the audience made some waves.

Indeed, Kane was greeted with some jeers during his first road appearance of the 2015-16 season, though he didn’t sound surprised.

(There were other controversial chants, apparently.)

Speaking of the crowd, it may not have been the greatest turnout:

ESPN goes way, way in depth on how the change of locale was received, by the way.

It wasn’t a perfect night inside the rink, either, as there weren’t exactly rave reviews about ice quality. New York Newsday’s Arthur Staple compared the ice to a “slushy” and “soup,” with an anonymous Islander (or Islanders) describing the conditions as “awful.”

Kane was pretty diplomatic about it, for what it’s worth.


So, no, it was not a perfect night for the Islanders.

They probably envisioned a teeming, perfectly mannered crowd. Management likely expected Jaroslav Halak to be in net, too.

Sometimes breaking ground is often about overcoming those early stumbles, though, and maybe the best review is to parallel the on-ice results: the Isles at least got a point out of it.

Let’s not forget that there are some cool perks that come with this situation, even if the specifics may vary.

If you want even more information/photos/etc., you’d probably do well to check out #IslesOpeningNight.

Columbus collapse: Rangers spoil Blue Jackets’ opener

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For a little more than a minute, Brandon Saad was going to be the story of the Columbus Blue Jackets’ opener. Instead, his power-play goal merely got the ball rolling on a flabbergasting finish.

The New York Rangers scored three goals in 1:17 of game time to manage a 4-2 win.

They’ve now spoiled home openers for the Chicago Blackhawks and Columbus Blue Jackets to begin their 2015-16 season.

It might be easiest just to show you when the goals were scored, noting that the third period began with a 1-1 tie.

Brandon Saad power-play goal: 16:10 into third period (2-1 Columbus)
Oscar Lindberg: 17:24 (2-2 tie)
Kevin Hayes: 17:41 (3-2 Rangers)
Mats Zuccarello: 18:41 (4-2 Rangers)

Yikes. Zuccarello scored two of the Rangers’ goals, while a beauty by Cam Atkinson is likely long forgotten.