Edmonton Oilers v Toronto Maple Leafs

Oilers decide that Shawn Horcoff’s return is worth taking a ‘calculated risk’

There are some (perhaps many) who will question the Edmonton Oilers and Shawn Horcoff’s “calculated risk” to allow the team captain to return to the ice before his knee injury fully healed.

Horcoff will skate with a brace on his right knee as he hasn’t fully recovered from a December 7th injury in which he collided with Anaheim Ducks forward Corey Perry.

Considering how far the Oilers are out of the Western Conference playoff picture, it seems curious to rush their 32-year-old captain back to action. Horcoff feels that there is plenty for the team to gain during the rest of the 2010-11 season, even if the playoffs are a distant possibility.

“Just because you’re out of the playoffs doesn’t mean you can’t put emphasis on hockey games,” said the veteran centre, who will likely skate between Taylor Hall and Dustin Penner in Thursday’s home game against the Dallas Stars at Rexall Place.

“Just because you’re out of the playoffs doesn’t mean you have nothing to play for. You have a job to play for,” he continued.

“We’ll just have to be creative and find some ways to push each other, to make sure every game is competitive. You have to work toward something. You still have to develop these kids, you have to develop your system play, you have to develop your team.

“When you finish the season strong, that has a tendency to carry on to the next one. We want to go into this summer feeling good about ourselves.”

Honestly, I’m not sure if it’s a wise idea to allow Horcoff to return so far from full strength without the dangling carrot of a playoff spot. Then again, the Oilers seem to be taking a big picture approach with this campaign; bringing back their captain during a seemingly lost season falls in line with barring Sheldon Souray from training camp despite the impact it would have on his trade value.

The team is attempting to foster a culture of winning after years of losing since the Chris Pronger trade. Horcoff is likely to be a part of that – at least in the early going – so that’s why they’re taking a risk by bringing him back.

We’ll just have to wait and see if that ends up being a wise decision or a foolish mistake.

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild

Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told ESPN.com that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.