One thing to consider if you’re hoping that the Lightning (or someone else) will sign Evgeni Nabokov

PHT readers and many in the hockey world – really, most people basing their opinions on common sense – think that the Tampa Bay Lightning and Evgeni Nabokov would be close to an ideal match.

Yet even the most vocal anti-Nabokov pundits would probably begrudgingly admit that more than one team would enjoy adding him to their fold if the price was right. In fact, the price being right is a huge factor in this process.

That’s because it might not be quite as simple as the Lightning exploiting Nabby’s slightly desperate situation to sign him to a cheap, low-risk deal. The reasoning is pretty simple: for the Lightning to sign Nabokov, he’ll need to go through waivers. In other words, this is a possible scenario:

  • One of the lower-ranked NHL teams sees the deal the Lightning (or some other team) made with Nabokov.
  • Said lower-ranked team (maybe the goalie-challenged New York Islanders?) says “Hey, we can afford that deal for 1-3 years.”
  • That team claims Nabokov on waivers, making the Russian goalie and Steve Yzerman sad pandas.

Here is what Pierre LeBrun wrote about Yzerman’s dilemma.

Here’s the dilemma if you’re Tampa GM Steve Yzerman: you don’t have a lot of money to spend, so if you sign Nabokov to a cheap contract, you risk losing him to another team on waivers that sees him as a good backup at that price. That’s the risk for any team that signs him. It’s possible some teams haven’t even bothered calling Nabokov’s agent, Don Meehan, about their interest because they’re lying in the weeds waiting to snap him up on waivers.

I also think Tampa is hesitant right now because its two goalies, Dan Ellis and Mike Smith, are popular teammates. You don’t want to rock the room. On the flip side, the Bolts are dead last in the league in goals against, and Nabokov is an upgrade. I think Yzerman is hoping the decision is made for him in the short term by Ellis and Smith playing better. But he may be eventually forced into looking hard at Nabokov if things don’t change.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara
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Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
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Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two: