Dallas Stars coach Marc Crawford proves critics wrong

If the Dallas Stars continue to follow the path they’ve laid out over a surprisingly successful first 31 games, a lot of people will be eating some Marc Crawford crow. I must admit that I would be a member of that group.

For a while, there was a slight feeling that Crawford was largely the right guy in the right place in the beginning of his coaching career. After all, he happened to coach a Colorado Avalanche team that boasted the likes of Patrick Roy, Joe Sakic, Peter Forsberg and Rob Blake. How many coaches would fall short of the mark with a roster that includes those stars plus plenty of great support players, really?

After a nice (if ultimately a bit disappointing) run with the Markus Naslund/Todd Bertuzzi Vancouver Canucks, Crawford fell flat with the the Los Angeles Kings. After earning a winning record in 10 of his first 11 years as a head coach between Los Angeles and Quebec/Colorado, Crawford went 59-84-12 with Los Angeles.

It seemed to me that he was a coach who had either lost his touch or was lucky to be so successful in the first place and his debut season in Dallas didn’t dispel that, as the club missed the playoffs once again.

Yet the NHL’s 11th all-time wins leader among coaches is putting together one heck of a season in 2010-11. The Stars hold a paper-thin lead for first place in the Pacific Division right now and with 39 points on the season, they only trail the Red Wings for first place in the West.

Mike Heika of the Dallas Morning News writes that maybe the guy can coach a bit after all.

But 31 games into this season, Crawford is looking a lot smarter. His players seem to be buying in. His system doesn’t look all that challenging after all. GM Joe Nieuwendyk has made some tweaks to the roster and added a nice complement to the coaching staff in Willie Desjardins. And, to be honest, Crawford has had a year to get his message across.

It might just mean that the guy still can coach a little. He tossed Tom Wandell up onto the checking line Thursday and was rewarded with a goal from the speedy and versatile forward.

There’s probably a lot of reasons the Stars are 18-10-3 this season, but don’t doubt for a second that Crawford is one of the biggest. He has handled the pressure well. He has kept a positive attitude. He has walked the line between motivator and supporter.

Crawford moved to 525-402-173 all-time. He has won a Stanley Cup. He has been coach of the year, he has coached in the Olympics … and it looks like he still has a few things left to accomplish.

Now, I might say that the combined brilliance of Brad Richards and Kari Lehtonen might rank a little higher than Crawford’s coaching, but let there be little doubt that Crawford has done an excellent job with the Stars. Honestly, I felt like the team’s defense was such a huge weakness that the team would be doomed, but so far they’re making it work.

Crawford deserves plenty of credit for that and other components of the Stars’ success. If he can keep this balancing act together to win the Pacific, then it’s quite possible that he might add another Jack Adams Trophy to his resume.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.