Dion Phaneuf returns to Calgary for first time since trade

Dion Phaneuf was once the great hope of the Calgary Flames. A devastating hitter with a big shot, Phaneuf was seen as the second coming of Al MacInnis. While the slap shot wasn’t as big as MacInnis’, Phaneuf made up for that with his intimidating physical presences on the ice. Paired up with Jarome Iginla, Flames fans figured they had the modern day equivalent to the MacInnis and Theo Fleury. Somewhere along the way, Phaneuf lost his way and he wasn’t quite the same player he started out as in his first couple seasons.

Whether the expectations for him were set too high because of his monstrous debut is up for debate, but eventually time waiting for Phaneuf to snap out of his funk ran out and he was packaged up in a mega-deal to Toronto. Phaneuf, Fredrik Sjostrom, and Keith Aulie packed their bags to head to Toronto in exchange for Matthew Stajan, Niklas Hagman, Ian White, and Jamal Mayers. The latter two players are now in other locations and for Calgary, some, like Sun Media’s Steve MacFarlane, have called the trade a definitive win for the Maple Leafs.

Tonight, Dion Phaneuf make his first appearance in Calgary since the January trade. Fortunes have changed a lot for both teams. Phaneuf is now the captain of the Maple Leafs, Ian White is now in Carolina and Jamal Mayers is in San Jose. Matthew Stajan has been a healthy scratch a few times this season.

The Leafs and Flames both are mired in inconsistency and both fan bases are frustrated. Leafs head coach Ron Wilson found an interesting way to help Phaneuf prepare for his Calgary homecoming, one expected to see Phaneuf met with boos: Wilson opted to boo Phaneuf in practice.

Phaneuf told reporters last week he did not expect “any negativity” during the trip to Calgary, which will be his first game there since the blockbuster deal.

“Oh he’ll hear [boos],” Wilson said. “I think he’ll be cheered … but it’s like Toronto, if 500 people boo, you guys write that 18,000 booed. Most of the people don’t want to boo, and there’s always a small amount of people who do. And a little bit of booing sounds like everyone is booing.

“Hopefully it doesn’t happen. He gave a lot of great years to Calgary and I think the fans appreciate what he’s done.”

Phaneuf, who spent 4½ seasons with the Flames, is not worried about how the fans in Calgary may treat him.

“I don’t know [what] the reaction is going to be. I never asked to be moved out of there, it’s part of the business and I have no hard feelings. I enjoyed my time there in the city.”

Phaneuf is right, he never asked to be moved out of Calgary, but in the eyes of some fans it just doesn’t matter and unless you brought the team a Stanley Cup, that’s just not good enough for them. Phaneuf didn’t spend a lot of time in Calgary, but his impact was huge while he was there and a lot was expected of him. Fans will do what they want, but booing him comes off looking rather petty. Phaneuf was a solid contributor while he was in Calgary but ultimately not a winner. If not winning it all is the issue, then booing might be the right thing. As it is, both of these teams hear enough booing on the road and at home as well, perhaps the message is just lost in voicing your disapproval.

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
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Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two:

Add Lecavalier to list of expensive Flyers healthy scratches

Vincent Lecavalier

Are the Philadelphia Flyers aiming for some sort of record when it comes to expensive (potential) healthy scratches?

While lineups are obviously subject to change, notes that Vincent Lecavalier appears to be among a rather rich group of Flyers who are expected to sit during their season-opener.

Also likely to be in street clothes: Sam Gagner and Luke Schenn.

That’s $11.3 million in cap space rotting on the bench.

“I really don’t know what to say,” Lecavalier said. “I’ll practice hard and be ready when they call me up.”

The quotes from Lecavalier, Gagner and Schenn only get sadder from there, a reminder that there are human beings attached to these numbers – whether you focus on disappointing stats or bloated salaries.

Flyers fans with the urge to reach for an Alka-Setzler can at least take some comfort in knowing that the team will see $6.8 million in savings after this season, as both Gagner and Schenn are on expiring deals.

It could be a long season, though, and this Lecavalier headache may not truly end until his contract expires following the 2017-18 campaign.