Forbes ranks Maple Leafs #1… In franchise value

Maple Leafs fans haven’t had much in the way of success to get excited about over the last few years. Hell, they haven’t had a lot to be happy about for quite some time really.  Today, though, the Leafs can have some sense of pride over being ranked #1 in something. Sure, it’s not being ranked #1 in terms of team success, but the Leafs are, once again, the NHL’s most valuable franchise according to Forbes Magazine.

The Leafs top Forbes’ list of most valuable franchises with a value of $505 million. That total is made more interesting today with the news of Rogers in Canada being interested in buying the Leafs in a package deal worth over $1 billion. It’s got to be nice to be wanted after all. Coming in second are the New York Rangers worth $461 million. Being Manhattan’s only team has its advantages as does playing your home games in Madison Square Garden.

In third, it’s the Leafs biggest rivals, the Montreal Canadiens. Montreal checks in with a franchise value of $408 million, something which the new owners, the Molson family, are happy to hear about. In fourth, the Detroit Red Wings come in worth $315 million. Years of success and a monstrous fan base ensure the worth of the Wings. The fifth most valuable team are the Boston Bruins checking in at $302 million.

Rounding out the top ten are the Philadelphia Flyers in sixth, Chicago Blackhawks seventh, Vancouver Canucks in eighth, Pittsburgh Penguins in ninth, and the Dallas Stars in tenth with a value of $227 million. Fascinating to see the Stars ranked so high especially with the team’s ownership currently in flux as they look for a new owner to take over operations. How much you want to bet Brad Richards is taking notice of the team’s worth as he looks towards getting a new contract.

As for the overall look at the league, Forbes says that the split between the haves and the have-nots is becoming a bit more distinct.

During the 2009-’10 season the 30 teams combined to generate $160 million of operating income (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) on revenue (net of proceeds required for arena debt) of $2.9 billion. But seven teams (the Toronto Maple Leafs, New York Rangers, Montreal Canadiens, Red Wings, Philadelphia Flyers, Black Hawks and Vancouver Canucks) combined to earn $241 million, with none making less than $13 million. Meanwhile, 16 teams were in the red, with the six biggest money-losers (Phoenix Coyotes, Florida Panthers, Washington Capitals, Atlanta Thrashers, Buffalo Sabres and Tampa Bay Lightning) dropping an aggregate of $63 million.

It’s odd seeing the Capitals in the mix with the likes of the Panthers and Lightning, but all three of those teams have seen ownership shifting of one variety or another. Caps owner Ted Leonsis bought the NBA’s Washington Wizards. The Panthers and Lightning saw ownership shifts with Cliff Viner coming to power with the Panthers and Jeff Vinik buying the Lightning.

For now though Leafs fans, enjoy the day for being the league’s most valuable team. We’re sure that the fans know all too well given that the Leafs have some of the highest ticket prices in the league.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.