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Riding the Zamboni – Saturday, November 27th

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New Jersey 2 – Philadelphia 1 (F/SO)

Johan Hedberg stopped 40 shots in the shootout win for New Jersey. Adam Mair had the Devils lone regulation goal while Travis Zajac got the shootout winner. Brian Boucher played well in defeat for Philly. For the Devils, it makes for a strong bounce back game after losing to the Islanders on Friday.

Pittsburgh 4 – Calgary 1

The Flames’ horrible road trip of terror came to a crashing end in Pittsburgh as Sidney Crosby netted a hat trick to give the Pens the win. Crosby’s trick gives him 18 goals on the season and the NHL point scoring lead, leap frogging Steve Stamkos for the time being. This just in, Sidney Crosby is still pretty good. Meanwhile, the Flames close out their five-game road trip going 1-2-2, managing to get four points out of a road trip where they only won one game. There’s your silver lining I suppose.

Montreal 3 – Buffalo 1

Brian Gionta’s two goals helped pace the Canadiens past the Sabres. While Ryan Miller did play well for Buffalo, Carey Price was the man once again. Price stopped 35 shots and barely missed out on earning another shutout when Jordan Leopold scored with 1:13 left in the game.

Ottawa 3 – Toronto 0

Brian Elliott was once again standing tall for the Senators earning his second shutout of the season. Mike Fisher finished with two goals for the Sens. Meanwhile, the Leafs offense continues to be miserable. Tonight marked the fifth time this year the Leafs were shutout.

Florida 4 – Tampa Bay 3 (F/SO)

The Panthers snapped a three game losing streak and did so thanks to getting a beauty of a penalty shot goal by Radek Dvorak during the game and an equally sweet shootout winner from Stephen Weiss. Tomas Vokoun was solid saving 34 shots in the win. As for Steve Stamkos, he finished the game with an assist.

Dallas 2 – St. Louis 1

In a game where you’d expect Jaroslav Halak to be the scene-stealing goalie, Kari Lehtonen stops 35 shots for Dallas and gets the headlines himself. Jamie Benn and Loui Eriksson had the goals for Dallas and for Eriksson it was his 10th of the year. B.J. Crombeen had the lone goal for St. Louis while Halak saved just 21 shots in the loss.

NY Rangers 2 – Nashville 1 (F/SO)

The Preds tried to coast on Colin Wilson’s first period goal all game, but Ryan Callahan’s tying goal late in the third sent it to overtime. Erik Christensen had the lone goal in the shootout to give the Rangers the win. Henrik Lundqvist stopped 29 shots for the Rangers while Pekka Rinne saved 23 for Nashville. Highlight of the night came when agitators Jordin Tootoo and Sean Avery squared off in a fight that saw Tootoo win handily.

Anaheim 6 – Phoenix 4

Bobby Ryan’s hat trick paced the Ducks to the win in the high-scoring affair in the desert. Jonas Hiller had 30 saves for Anaheim, meanwhile Ilya Bryzgalov was underwhelming stopping just 19 in the loss. Ryan Getzlaf finished the game with four assists.

Colorado 7 – Minnesota 4

A goaltending exhibition this was not. Niklas Backstrom was awful yet again, this time yielding six goals, two of which were to Greg Mauldin. It wasn’t all good news for the Avs though as they lost Chris Stewart to a broken hand suffered in a fight with Kyle Brodziak. Brodziak had two goals for the suddenly defensively incapable Wild.

San Jose 4 – Edmonton 3

Dany Heatley was booed throughout the game in Edmonton thanks to him turning down a trade to Edmonton last off-season which lead to him being sent to San Jose from Ottawa. Heatley gave Oilers fans a real reason to boo him after scoring twice in leading the Sharks to the victory. The Oilers tried to storm back in the third after being down 4-1 and got to within 4-3 thanks to quick goals from Shawn Horcoff and Jim Vandermeer but couldn’t get the equalizer. For the Sharks, holding off a team in the third could be the boost they were looking for.

Chicago 2 – Los Angeles 1

The name “Patrick” isn’t likely to be popular in L.A. tonight as Patrick Sharp and Patrick Kane had the goals for the Blackhawks tonight in their win over the Kings. Corey Crawford got the nod once again in goal and got the win stopping 21 shots. Anze Kopitar had L.A.’s only goal and Jon Quick was the hard luck loser saving 21 shots. Chicago closes out their west coast swing strongly and gets to head back home feeling pretty good about things.

Game highlight for the squeamish and blood thirsty: Chicago’s John Scott beating the living daylights out of Kings enforcer Kevin Westgarth. For those keeping track at home, that’s Michigan Tech alum Scott beating Princeton alum Westgarth. Who says higher education doesn’t serve a purpose?

Alexander Radulov is the x-factor for the Canadiens

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 16:  Alexander Radulov #47 of Russia celebrates after scoring a goal in a shoot out against Jan Laco #50 of Slovakia during the Men's Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group A game on day nine of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Bolshoy Ice Dome on February 16, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The Montreal Canadiens just went through a potentially franchise altering offseason that saw them keep the coach and GM that presided over one of the biggest collapses in franchise history, trade the most popular player on the team (P.K. Subban), and then go all in on toughening up the lineup by trading for Andrew Shaw.

It was such a crazy offseason that the addition of Alexander Radulov, perhaps one of the most intriguing and fascinating moves of the offseason by any team in the league, has almost completely slid under the radar and been forgotten about. And he might be one of the most important players on the team when it comes to the Canadiens’ success this season.

Nearly a decade ago Radulov looked to be on his way to stardom in the NHL before he abruptly left for the KHL, a league he dominated for the better part of the past eight years minus his brief return to Nashville (that also had some controversy with it).

Now he is back for another run at the NHL.

While Shaw, one of the team’s other big offseason additions, was getting ejected from his preseason debut with his new team on Tuesday night, Radulov had a dramatically different night on the ice. He not only recorded a pair of points by scoring an early goal and then assisting on a Nathan Beaulieu goal, but he also looked like a top-line player.

Yes, it is only one preseason game. But it was at the very least a small glimpse at the potential that Radulov could bring to a team that so desperately needs what he could provide.

What’s especially amazing about all of this is that a player like Shaw is going to be the one that gets the bulk of the attention because of the way he plays and the energy he brings.

Beaulieu heaped a massive amount of praise on both Radulov and Shaw for the way the played on Tuesday, pointing out that both bring elements the team had lacked. But he seemed to be especially fired up by Shaw’s performance. He hit on all of the key points that come with a player like Shaw, especially when it came to his gesturing to the crowd for more noise during his fight with Nathan Walker.

“I love it. He is my favorite player,” said Beaulieu. “That was awesome. That’s also something we were probably missing the last couple of years, a little bit of emotion. That is something he brings. I absolutely love seeing that. He is instantly a fan favorite just from doing that. Although it’s a preseason game, he’s a physical guy, he’s passionate about hockey. I can guarantee you everyone in this room absolutely loved it.”

“He’s just such an emotional wrecking ball, he drove me absolutely crazy last year, for him to just step in he is so comfortable already. The way he can get 20,000 people behind him like that, he is a special individual.”

That is all well and good, and there is definitely an emotional element to all of this that Shaw does bring, and you can not completely toss things like that that out the window. But the No. 1 priority here is still putting the puck in the net and scoring goals. That is the big thing that has been missing for the Canadiens over the past two years, a window where the team only scored 430 goals. That number put them 20th in the league over that stretch. Of the nine teams below them, only two of them (Vancouver and Philadelphia) qualified for the playoffs in either those seasons (one appearance for each, with neither advancing beyond the first round).

The lesson here: You can not succeed being as punchless as the Canadiens have been offensively the past two years.

Even with players like Subban (before the trade), Max Pacioretty (one of the NHL’s best goal scorers) and Alex Galchenyuk (already a 30-goal scorer whose best days should still be ahead of him) offense has been a major struggle for the team. They need to score more, and you are not going to emotion the puck into the net. Whether it comes down to the system put in place by the coaching staff, the talent assembled by the front office, or some other intangible factor, the team has simply not scored enough goals and has fallen into a hole where it will only go as far as a healthy Carey Price can take it.

Fortunately for Montreal, Price looks ready to go after missing almost all of the 2015-16 season due to injury. But for as good as he is, he still should not need to be constantly put into a position where he has to be nearly perfect every night for his team to have a chance to win.

Even though Radulov might not be the player he was eight years ago (he is, after all, 30 years old instead of 22) or score the way he did against lesser competition in the KHL, he is still a big-time NHL talent that can be a top-line player.

He is still a player that brings a potential element that the Canadiens have lacked more than emotion and fire.

His ability to be that player (and he has to get the opportunity from the coach, and not get instantly glued to the bench the first time something goes wrong with him on the ice) might have a much bigger impact on the success of the Canadiens than almost anybody else not named Price.

Canada beats Team Europe 3-1 in Game 1 of World Cup Final

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 27: Steven Stamkos #91 of Team Canada is congratulated by his teammates after scoring a first period goal against Team Europe during Game One of the World Cup of Hockey final series at Air Canada Centre on September 27, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The good news for Team Europe is they were able to hang with Team Canada for most of the night in Game 1 of the World Cup final on Tuesday night.

The bad news for Team Europe is Canada, while playing perhaps its worst game of the tournament, was still good enough to win, 3-1, and take a 1-0 lead in the series. Canada is now in a position where it can win the tournament with a victory on Thursday night.

Early on this seemed like it was going to be Europe’s chance to get the upper hand in the series, but they just could not generate enough offense, especially on the power play that has still not scored a goal in the tournament, to take advantage of what was probably an off night for Canada. That sort of off night from Canada probably will not happen again on Thursday.

Even though it did not look as dominant as some of their other performances in the tournament, it was still pretty much the same recipe for Team Canada. The Sidney CrosbyBrad MarchandPatrice Bergeron line provided the bulk of the offense, they shut the game down over the second and third periods defensively, and Carey Price built a wall around his net and made the saves his team needed him to make.

Marchand, just one day after signing his eight-year contract extension with the Boston Bruins, opened the scoring just two minutes into the first period when he scored his third goal of the tournament. Ten minutes later Steven Stamkos gave Canada a 2-0 lead when he scored his first goal of the tournament, finishing an odd-man rush with Ryan Getzlaf.

After a Tomas Tatar goal cut the deficit to just a single goal for Team Europe in the second period, they had a great opportunity to tie the game when Andrej Sekera had a breakaway that was turned aside by Price to keep the lead. Even though the game remained close, they never really had a better opportunity to tie the game. They were clearly missing Marian Gaborik who was injured in the semifinal game against Sweden. He could be sidelined for eight weeks as a result of that injury.

Bergeron added to the Canada lead and pretty much put the game out of reach midway through the third period with his second goal of the tournament. That goal was assisted by Crosby, his second point of the game, giving him a tournament leading nine points.

Canadiens’ Andrew Shaw ejected for boarding Capitals’ Connor Hobbs

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Will Montreal Canadiens forward Andrew Shaw be the first player to get a phone call from the NHL’s department of player safety this season? Based on the second period of Tuesday’s preseason game against the Washington Capitals, he certainly could be.

Shaw, playing in his first exhibition game with his new team, was ejected from the game late in the second period for boarding Connor Hobbs.

Immediately after the hit, Shaw found himself in a fight with Washington’s Nathan Walker, a sequence that involved Shaw earning 30 penalty minutes — a five-minute major for boarding, a five-minute major for fighting, a 10-minute misconduct, and a 10-minute game misconduct. As Shaw was involved in his fight with Walker, he was gesturing to the Montreal crowd for noise and then managed to get one extra shot in at Walker after he was down on the ice.

It was a eventful period for Shaw who found himself in the middle of multiple incidents in a short period of time. Along with everything mentioned above, he was also taken down in the neutral zone by Jay Beagle on what looked to be a slew foot. Here is a look at both of those incidents (the Beagle on Shaw incident, and the Shaw on Hobbs hit) via @MarcDumont.

Shaw was a major addition for the Canadiens this offseason, along with Shea Weber in the P.K. Subban trade, as they tried to add more toughness to their lineup.

Islanders goalie situation could leave Jean-Francois Berube in tough spot

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 02:  Jean-Francois Berube #30 of the New York Islanders watches a shot just miss the net during the first period against the Pittsburgh Penguins on April 2, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The problem with having two capable NHL goaltenders is that only one of them can play at a time, and somebody that probably deserves to get more playing time is going to be stuck on the bench.

That situation gets even more complicated when you have three capable goalies, all of whom are signed to one-way contracts.

That is the situation the New York Islanders are looking at as they enter training camp with Jaroslav Halak, Thomas Greiss and Jean-Francois Berube all under contract for this season. It is a similar situation to the one they faced at times last season when all three goalies were healthy and Berube spent most of the year sitting in the press box as a healthy scratch, never really getting any meaningful playing time at either the NHL or AHL levels.

With Halak and Greiss both playing for Team Europe at the World Cup (Halak is stealing the show, and perhaps the tournament) it is allowing Berube to get some early playing time in camp. But once Halak and Greiss return, things are going to get very crowded, very quickly.

Berube acknowledged that possibility on Tuesday. Here he is talking about the situation this week, via Newsday‘s Arthur Staple:

“I know it’s a possibility to happen again. I have no idea what’s going to come when those guys get back. I’m trying to focus on getting as much work in as I can and use this time to get prepared for the season.”

“We all know it’s not the greatest situation,” Berube said of having three goaltenders. “For me, I play my best when I play a lot and I’m used to playing a lot. We just have to see what happens.”

Halak is by far the most established of the three goalies, both in terms of experience and performance.

His overall career numbers don’t put him among the NHL’s elite at the position, but he has always been a solid starter. Plus, as he has shown in the World Cup (just as he did in the 2010 playoffs) he is capable of going on hot streaks where he carries his team. There is a lot of value in that. He still has two years left on his contract.

Behind him you have Greiss and Berube. Greiss has turned into a rock solid backup over the past few years and played great for the Islanders in the playoffs last season while Halak was sidelined due to injury. Berube has pretty much established that he has little left to prove in the AHL and is probably ready to be a full-time NHL player in some capacity.

A trade at some point is probably the easiest way to remedy this situation for the Islanders, but even that isn’t going to be easy. Trading Halak (which the Islanders reportedly considered over the summer until he had surgery) doesn’t seem like it would make a great deal of sense at this point because there are almost no teams that are in the market for a starting goaltender. That would make it next to impossible to get a worthwhile return, and you don’t want to just give him away.

Berube is still only 25 years old and still eligible for restricted free agency after this season, is still cheap against the cap, is still the youngest out of the trio (by a few years), and seems to have an upside that the Islanders like. That leaves Greiss, an unrestricted free agent at the end of the season.

The only other option, outside of a trade emerging at some point (even though the market is slim now, it should pick up once the season begins as teams need upgrades for starters and backups), is a repeat of most of last season where they carry three goalies until one gets injured, which means Berube is likely to once again be the odd man out.