Mike Modano suffers from lacerated wrist; surgery will keep him out indefinitely


Sometimes, life has a way of throwing you a cruel break at a curious time. It’s hard to wonder if this might be the final blow to a great veteran’s career, too.

Take, for instance, Mike Modano’s night. On the same day that reports circulated that the former face of the Dallas Stars franchise admitted that he “kind of gave up” for a few seasons with his former team, Modano apparently lacerated a tendon in his right wrist during Friday’s game against the Columbus Blue Jackets.

At some point in the contest, someone’s skate must have cut his wrist. Anyone who remembers seeing Alexei Yashin’s grisly arm injury (among other unfortunate skate-related cuts, such as the far more serious moment for Richard Zednik) will attest to how scary a moment that can be.

I cannot help but wonder if last night’s game might be Modano’s last, as the 40-year-old cannot have many more seasons left (unless he wants to pull a Chris Chelios, of course). TSN reports that he will be out indefinitely after undergoing surgery on that wrist.

Detroit Red Wings forward Mike Modano has undergone surgery after suffering a laceration from a skate blade on his right wrist during a game against the Columbus Blue Jackets on Friday night. The veteran will be out of the lineup indefinitely depending on the progress of his recovery.

Modano left the game against Columbus with about six minutes left in the second period. He returned to Detroit following the game. The surgery was performed this morning at the Detroit Medical Center.

Modano’s injury included one severed tendon and slight damage to a nerve.

Who knows if this will really be that bad, as “out indefinitely” is one of the most nebulous terms in sports. The bottom line is that this doesn’t sound very good, though.

Hopefully this won’t be the last we see of the all-time American great, but if it is so, he certainly had a fantastic NHL career. Good luck to Modano.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara
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Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
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Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two: