Colin Campbell

Colin Campbell exposed: Says Marc Savard is “biggest faker going”; berates officials for picking on his son

2 Comments

If you’ve ever thought that NHL disciplinarian Colin Campbell might’ve had it out for your team regarding punishment or handled the Marc Savard-Matt Cooke scenario in a highly-questionable manner considering Cooke wasn’t suspended for his hit on Savard, consider today to be your day of vindication.

Tyler Dellow of mc79hockey.com has uncovered e-mails between Campbell and former head of NHL officiating Stephen Walkom that outline how Campbell gets in Walkom’s ear in situations when infractions against his son Gregory (then of the Florida Panthers, now of the Boston Bruins) he found to be wrong.

We also find out that Colin Campbell doesn’t think very highly of Bruins forward Marc Savard, a dislike that might have roots going back to the days when Campbell coached the New York Rangers and Savard was a young forward he coached. There’s almost too much information here to quote and share with you, but we’ll give you the juiciest bits to chew on. We really can’t recommend highly enough going to Dellow’s site and reading the entire piece.

At the heart of the matter here is Colin Campbell and Stephen Walkom discussing the officiating work of (now former) referee Dean Warren. Campbell was incensed with Warren’s work and sought to get Warren fired for his inconsistent officiating and was in the ear of Walkom to let him know his thoughts on how he’s doing. Warren was fired and challenged the NHL in court over his firing saying his work with the NHLOA lead to his dismissal. If you’re wondering how these e-mails were available to be found, it’s because they’re part of the record pertaining to this case. Mike Murphy who is mentioned here is the NHL’s vice president of hockey operations.

This e-mail from Campbell to Walkom in particular is ripe for discussion. Names were already removed from it and the only edit we’re doing is to edit some of the colorful language used. We don’t want this post to get nixed by your sensitive work filters for naughty language. Again, we stress to you to go read the full post to get the full story on how things go down.

A couple weeks later Mike Murphy or Mr. Walkom (it was not clear which) wrote to Mr. Campbell (and Mr. Walkom) that Mr. Warren had “missed high stick on [player] with 130 left in the game…..hard for a Ref to see….[general manager] will be whining’. Mr. Campbell replied:

To Stephen Walkom/Tor/NHL@NHL
Subject Re: Delayed Penalties/High Sticks 02/#/2007 4:24 pm

A bend in the road is a dead end if you round the corner and Dean Warren is standing there. Your answer re: his high stick calls and the score of the game were horse sh**. The 3rd call on [player] was while they were down 5 on 4 and on a def zone face off vs that little fake artist [player] I had him in [city] biggest faker going. And Warren fell for it when he grabbed his face on a face off. Your supposed to see the act, not call the embellishing act. Dean Warren has to go with [referee] There must be a way to get rid of this guy. Is there a way we can tract (sic) and total minors called by referees this year. We could then get the minors they call per game. … or with 2 [referees on the ice] it is impossible? Warren and [referee] out of [club’s] games. Give them to [referees].

Stephen Walkom to: Colin Campbell 02/#/2007 04:39 PM

that’s funny yet not funny….I think we have that data but it may work in his favour….that’s why I’m against data and more about IT….he doesn’t have it, never had it, and is average at best, probably never get it,

OK I’m going to stop it….

From: Stephen Walkom
Sent: 02/#/2007 08:09 AM
To: Mike Murphy
Cc: Colin Campbell
Subject: Re: ….. / …….

Terry ran into …….after the game who was upset, linesmen…………..viewed the play but no injury could be found therefore no call [player] was saying to Terry that he was injured but the guys didn’t see anything but spit and gatorade residue….therefore no double minor….

Re [player]
Colin Campbell to Stephen Walkom, Mike Murphy
02/#/2007 09:21 AM

I know Murph and Kinger like [player] as a player but my view of him is this exactly…he puts his whining ahead of the game. I don’t think this is a regular occurrence (…..getting screwed) and …..exploded ………over the disallowed goal. He may be uncontrollable by ………….and……………..as I think his frustration level has hit a high point. He hates officials as well. He is still pissed off at [referee] for a call he missed in the playoffs years ago as I remember him bugging Murph about it. Let’s give him Warren and [referee] than (sic) he will really have something to whine about.

If you’re curious about who in the world Campbell is so hot under the collar discussing, Bruins fans might want to take a keen eye to who Dellow was able to do the detective work to find out which game this was in reference to and who the interested parties were that managed to draw Campbell’s ire. Those of you who have suspected that nepotism and old grudges might rule Campbell’s world, you’re about to get a huge dose of vindication.

OK – this one I think we can nail down. We know that Campbell is upset about a situation involving a team that was already down to 5 v 4, on a defensive zone faceoff against a “little fake artist” who Campbell had (presumably in New York when he coached the Rangers. We also know that it was that player’s third penalty of the night. We can assume, from the chair’s description of this as being a few weeks after some earlier February emails, that it was in late February.

As it so happens, there is a game featuring players that meet this description. On February 24, 2007, Dean Warren reffed a game between the Bruins and the Panthers. At 13:29 of the second, Alexei Semenov was called for high sticking. Marc Savard, who played for Colin Campbell when he coached the Rangers, came out over the boards. He glided towards the dot where he faced off with Panthers penalty killer…Gregory Campbell. The puck was dropped and Campbell was called for high sticking. His third penalty of the game.

This is the only game from February, 2007 that meets the description.

So to dumb things down here this is what we’ve got:

  • Colin Campbell thinks that Marc Savard is a “little fake artist” and  “the biggest faker going”
  • Colin Campbell gets really upset when his son is made a fool of by a referee
  • Colin Campbell holds a huge grudge

Dellow’s piece goes on to analyze a few more e-mails from Campbell to Walkom and finds yet another instance when Greg Campbell was wronged by an official and Colin Campbell blew his stack about it to Walkom. I don’t think we need to make it any clearer what an extremely large conflict of interest this is for not just the players on the ice, but also the integrity of the officials working a game where Greg Campbell is playing.

Oddly enough, this off-season we saw Greg Campbell end up in Boston, the same city where Marc Savard plays. Did the Bruins feel they got the short end of the stick when Matt Cooke wasn’t suspended after taking Savard’s head off and thought that if they brought Greg Campbell on board they’d get a fairer shake from the league? It’s not likely the main motivation, but having dad peeking over his son’s new team’s shoulder every game can’t hurt. At the very least, when Savard returns to the lineup that first day in the locker room might be a lot more interesting now.

Amusingly so, Colin Campbell comes off out of all this looking like a hockey parent out of control doing the sorts of things with his position of power that parents that run their kid’s pee-wee league do to make sure that their child always ends up on the all-star teams. After all, he ends up e-mailing the head of officiating to yell about his kid not getting a fair shake, one of the officials indicated in this whole situation has already lost his job (Dean Warren), and the discussion about Campbell having an extreme conflict of interest in having his job and a relative playing in the league can now no longer be pooh-poohed as not being possible since this is a professional league.

Instead, you’ve got a league official ruling the roost with a chip on his shoulder, playing favorites towards his own son, and a grudge towards at least one player he used to coach. There is absolutely zero way for this to look good on the NHL to have a person in a position of power, a man who makes the decisions on who gets suspended or not and for how long, to work with a clear mind and without bias when he’s clearly got some problems with some players and officials. How the NHL decides to answer to this will be fascinating. Regardless of what kind of PR-friendly way they answer to this, the NHL looks horrible because of it.

It’s hard to believe that Colin Campbell will keep his job much longer after this. All the chatter and innuendo that was made with a wink and a nod about how Campbell plays favorites is no longer funny when it’s found to actually be true. It’s not as if Campbell has been without controversy already concerning his decisions on virtually everything, the spotlight has been on him for a long time as it is and now those that have been highly critical of him have the smoking gun they’ve been dying to see.

In a fun twist, it turns out the one guy who could keep us from talking about Sean Avery all day on Monday over his fight is the same guy that decided to sit Avery down for six games for saying nasty things about an old girlfriend. Colin Campbell might very well get a permanent vacation for colorful language of his own.

(Update: The NHL has responded to the situation and their take on things won’t help quiet down the public outcry)

Jets have some disagreements with Trouba’s suspension, lack of suspension for Malkin

CHICAGO, IL - JANUARY 26: Jacob Trouba #8 of the Winnipeg Jets looks to pass the puck against the Chicago Blackhawks at the United Center on January 26, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. The Jets defeated the Blackhawks 5-3. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Getty
1 Comment

The NHL’s department of player safety handed Winnipeg Jets defenseman Jacob Trouba a two-game suspension on Monday afternoon for a high, forceful hit to Ottawa Senators forward Mark Stone over the weekend.

Stone is one of the many Senators forwards out of the lineup on Tuesday night.

It is a decision that has left the Jets feeling a little confused. Not only because of the suspension itself, but because of the lack of a suspension for Pittsburgh Penguins forward Evgeni Malkin for a high hit he delivered on Jets forward Blake Wheeler on Thursday night in Pittsburgh.

That perceived inconsistency has not entirely sat well with the Jets.

On Tuesday, before their game against the Toronto Maple Leafs, Wheeler shared some of his thoughts on the differing decisions by the league.

“You like to see consistency throughout,” Wheeler said on Tuesday, via ESPN’s Pierre LeBrun. “We respect the fact they have a lot of hits they have to sort through every single day. There’s two glaring examples back to back, it gets the question why one way and why not the other way? So, it’s a little bit frustrating to see it. Even Jacob would say his hit wasn’t ideal, wishes he could have it back. You can’t really even speculate why they didn’t do the same to Malkin. It sure didn’t feel good.”

The NHL has not made an official explanation as to why it did not suspend Malkin, but it’s been reported that the league simply views the two plays as different types of hits. In the case of Malkin’s hit on Wheeler, the league saw the shoulder being the biggest point of contact and that it wasn’t necessarily charging or interference.

This was the hit.

He had more thoughts, again via LeBrun:

“My answer to that is why is he hitting me at all? It has no impact on the play whatsoever. You know Evgeni Malkin is pretty aware of his surroundings on the ice, he’s one of the top players in the league. I think he knows who has the puck and who doesn’t have the puck. If I’m him and I’m hitting a guy like that, it’s a cheap shot. Because I know I’m doing that. That’s to me how I see it.”

Jets coach Paul Maurice was also asked about the decision to suspend Trouba and had a very odd way of voicing his disagreement, deciding to talk about how frugal he is financially, pretty much suggesting that he does not want to say anything that would get him fined.

“What’s the truth? So we respectfully accept the decision while we disagree,” said Maurice, then briefly pausing before deciding to continue.

“I got one. I drive a 2011 Yukon. I bought it used. Because I’m cheap. Frugal. Frugality. Frugalness. I am not sure how you want to go with it. But my cheapness outweighs my disappointment. Fair enough?”

Sure is, coach! In other words: He does not like it, but he does not want to lose any of his paycheck for saying what he really thinks.

When asked if the lack of a suspension for Malkin weighed into his disappointment, he added “I would suggest that any of the spinal fractures that we have suffered over the past year would weigh into my disappointment.”

Trouba will miss the Jets’ games on Tuesday against Toronto and then their Feb. 28 game against Minnesota following their bye week.

He will be eligible to return on March 3 against the St. Louis Blues.

Isles hit the road for whopping nine-game stretch

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 05:  John Tavares #91 of the New York Islanders  heads onto the ice before the game against the Edmonton Oilers at the Barclays Center on November 5, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
Getty
Leave a comment

NEW YORK (AP) After climbing back into the playoff race with nearly unbeatable play at home the last month, the New York Islanders will need to quickly find a way to win on the road to preserve their postseason hopes.

Just a month ago, the Islanders were in last place in the conference. Now, they sit just two points behind Boston for the Eastern Conference’s second wild-card spot. The turnaround has been keyed by a 9-0-2 record in their last 11 at Barclays Center – their longest points streak on home ice since 1982.

“We’ve somehow just got comfortable and we’ve gotten into a rhythm (at home),” forward Ryan Strome said. “We’ve got to try to obviously take that to the road if we want to make the playoffs.”

The Islanders have seven wins on the road, tied with Carolina and Dallas for the fewest in the league, and they play 17 of their final 24 games away from home. They’ll get that started with a franchise-record stretch of nine straight road games over a 19-day span due to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus and Atlantic Coast Conference men’s college basketball tournament at Barclays Center.

“I think it’s good for us. We’ve been home a lot this year,” forward Andrew Ladd said. “To get the opportunity to go out on the road and spend some time together, it’s not a bad thing. We obviously have to figure out a way to win on the road and be more consistent.”

The strong play at home followed the coaching change on Jan. 17, when assistant Doug Weight was promoted on an interim basis to replace the fired Jack Capuano, who led the Islanders to their first postseason series win in 23 years last April. They were 17-17-8 and in last place in the East, eight games back of a playoff spot, at the time of the change.

The Islanders’ latest win — 6-4 against New Jersey on Sunday — pushed their overall mark to 10-4-2 since.

Weight said he planned to make some adjustments to the team’s routine during the upcoming road swing, including altering video and scouting sessions ahead of games. There also could be some line combination changes during games.

“We got to change things,” Weight said. “We don’t have a good feeling, not a good vibe on the road right now. … We’ve been (home) a lot and we’ve been great (at home) and it’s been a crutch. Hopefully, we can get on the road and get together as a team and start to be that good road team that I believe we can be.”

The stretch of road games will be broken into two trips. The Islanders begin a three-game, five-day trip at Detroit on Tuesday night. After facing Columbus on Saturday, they’ll return home for several days before visiting the Stars on March 2 to start a six-game, 10-day trip.

“It’s a lot of big games in a short period of time,” forward Casey Cizikas said. “We got to be ready and just take it one game at a time but know the importance of each game. … We got to play a full 60 (minutes). We can’t come out with flat starts.”

Last season, the Islanders won six of seven on a trip around the same time on the calendar, and that helped lead them to a second straight playoff appearance. They’ll need similar success to boost their chances to make it three years in a row.

The Islanders don’t return to Brooklyn until they host the Hurricanes on March 13. They are still far short of the 30-game home point streak set 35 years ago – in the midst of their run of four straight Stanley Cup titles. That stretch – which came before teams earned a point for losses in overtime and when there weren’t shootouts to decide ties after the extra period – included a 21-0-2 mark to end the 1981-82 season and a 7-0-0 start to the 1982-83 campaign.

Trade: Canadiens send Philip Samuelsson to Hurricanes for Keegan Lowe

ST PAUL, MN - JUNE 25:  President of Hockey Operations Kevin Lowe of the Edmonton Oilers and son 73rd overall pick Keegan Lowe by the Carolina Hurricanes look on during day two of the 2011 NHL Entry Draft at Xcel Energy Center on June 25, 2011 in St Paul, Minnesota.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
Getty
1 Comment

The Montreal Canadiens and Carolina Hurricanes completed a minor trade on Tuesday afternoon when the Canadiens sent defenseman Philip Samuelsson to the Hurricanes in exchange for defenseman Keegan Lowe.

Neither player has played a game in the NHL this season and both will report to their respective AHL teams.

The most interesting aspect of this deal is that Samuelsson’s dad, former NHL defenseman Ulf Samuelsson, is the head coach of the Hurricanes’ AHL team, the Charlotte Checkers.

Samuelsson, originally a second-round draft pick by the Pittsburgh Penguins in 2009, has spent this season with the St. John’s IceCaps where he has one goal and four assists in 40 games. He has played in 13 games at the NHL level, most recently with Arizona last season, and has yet to record a point. He signed with the Canadiens over the summer as a free agent, inking a one-year, two-way deal.

Lowe, a second-round pick by the Hurricanes in 2011 and the son of former NHL player Kevin Lowe, has two games of NHL experience (both in 2014-15) and has spent the past two seasons playing in Charlotte. He has three goals and nine assists in 49 games this season. The Canadiens announced he will immediately report to St. John’s of the AHL.

Injuries adding up for Senators as Stone, Hoffman out tonight; Ryan to miss month

PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMBER 15: Mark Stone #61 of the Ottawa Senators skates with the puck against the Philadelphia Flyers at Wells Fargo Center on November 15, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Getty
Leave a comment

The Ottawa Senators, currently making a serious run at the top spot in the Atlantic Division, have been one of the biggest surprises in the NHL.

Unfortunately some major injuries are starting to hit them at the wrong time as they will be without several top forwards on Tuesday night when they take on the New Jersey Devils.

We already knew Bobby Ryan was going to be sidelined due to a hand injury, but coach Guy Boucher confirmed on Tuesday that the veteran winger is going to miss 4-6 weeks due to a broken finger. Adding to the injury issues on Tuesday is the fact forwards Mike Hoffman and Mark Stone will also be sidelined.

Stone, who was injured on Sunday night when he was on the receiving end of a Jacob Trouba hit that resulted in a two-game suspension, is going to miss the game due to a neck injury and there remains no timetable for his return.

Hoffman was also injured in that game against the Jets and will not play on Tuesday due to a groin injury.

These are some pretty significant injuries to the Senators, especially when it comes to Hoffman and Stone, two of the top-four scorers on the team and two of their most dangerous offensive players. The injury to Stone couldn’t have come at a worse time for him, either, as he has been on a roll over the past month, recording 13 points in the team’s past 13 games, including a five-point game against Toronto on Saturday night.

Entering play on Tuesday the Senators are just two points behind the Montreal Canadiens for the top spot in the Atlantic Division. A Senators win in New Jersey, combined with a Montreal loss in regulation to the Rangers, would move the Senators into a first-place tie and for the time being give them the edge on tiebreakers (fewer games played).