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Coaches-in-waiting most likely to land next open NHL job

In the last few days, we discussed Ron Wilson’s shaky hold on the Toronto Maple Leafs coaching position and also analyzed the danger Scott Gordon, John MacLean, Lindy Ruff and Randy Carlyle might be in.

(It seems like Carlyle is safe for the moment, but at the time, he was in serious trouble.)

Yet with all that analysis and speculation, we haven’t spoken much about the coaches who might replace them.

ESPN’s Scott Burnside took a look at some of the leading candidates for a potential job opening today. Here is a snippet.

We have to start with Ken Hitchcock. His résumé includes a Stanley Cup in Dallas and two Olympic gold medals as an assistant in 2002 and 2010. While offense isn’t necessarily his forte, he’s tactically terrific and defensively among the best. And he’s got instant credibility for teams looking for just that.

Hitchcock seems like a natural fit for the New Jersey Devils, a historically defensive-minded franchise mostly stocked with veteran players. He might still get under some players’ skin, but maybe that’s a good thing?

Running a close second will be Michel Therrien and Bob Hartley. We put the two French Canadian coaches together not just because they’re long-time pals, but because they bring a measure of old-school “beat them in the alley” mentality with their top organizational skills.

Therrien seems like a good “transitional” coach – he helped the Pittsburgh Penguins grow from cellar dwellers to legitimate contenders – while Hartley owns a Cup. I’m not sure if Hartley is that special, though. He almost seemed like a hockey world answer to Barry Switzer in that it seemed like anyone could help that talent-rich Colorado Avalanche team win a Cup.

In the minors, what about Don Lever, who won an AHL championship in Hamilton and is now coaching the AHL Chicago Wolves? He’s had NHL experience as an assistant for many years.

And then there’s longtime NHLer Kevin Dineen, who was thought to be in line for the Columbus job, but whom many believe deserves a shot at a head-coaching gig. He’s currently the coach in Portland of the AHL.

Burnside also mentioned Craig MacTavish, but I’d like to throw two other names in the hat: Pat Quinn (pictured, on the left) and former St. Louis Blues coach Andy Murray. I already discussed the 66-year-old Quinn’s uphill battle to return to the coaching ranks, but Murray could be a nice fit with the right team.

I could see Murray helping anyone from a scrappy team like the Islanders, a mixed bag like Buffalo or even a defensively porous team like the Devils. He might even be the second best option behind Hitchcock.

Finally, the last coach to come to mind is Ted Nolan. He might not be an easy guy to work with, but he got a lot out of most of the teams he coached.

Anyway, who do you think would be a good fit for a team that might make a coaching change soon? Let us know in the comments.

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild
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Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.