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Coaches-in-waiting most likely to land next open NHL job

In the last few days, we discussed Ron Wilson’s shaky hold on the Toronto Maple Leafs coaching position and also analyzed the danger Scott Gordon, John MacLean, Lindy Ruff and Randy Carlyle might be in.

(It seems like Carlyle is safe for the moment, but at the time, he was in serious trouble.)

Yet with all that analysis and speculation, we haven’t spoken much about the coaches who might replace them.

ESPN’s Scott Burnside took a look at some of the leading candidates for a potential job opening today. Here is a snippet.

We have to start with Ken Hitchcock. His résumé includes a Stanley Cup in Dallas and two Olympic gold medals as an assistant in 2002 and 2010. While offense isn’t necessarily his forte, he’s tactically terrific and defensively among the best. And he’s got instant credibility for teams looking for just that.

Hitchcock seems like a natural fit for the New Jersey Devils, a historically defensive-minded franchise mostly stocked with veteran players. He might still get under some players’ skin, but maybe that’s a good thing?

Running a close second will be Michel Therrien and Bob Hartley. We put the two French Canadian coaches together not just because they’re long-time pals, but because they bring a measure of old-school “beat them in the alley” mentality with their top organizational skills.

Therrien seems like a good “transitional” coach – he helped the Pittsburgh Penguins grow from cellar dwellers to legitimate contenders – while Hartley owns a Cup. I’m not sure if Hartley is that special, though. He almost seemed like a hockey world answer to Barry Switzer in that it seemed like anyone could help that talent-rich Colorado Avalanche team win a Cup.

In the minors, what about Don Lever, who won an AHL championship in Hamilton and is now coaching the AHL Chicago Wolves? He’s had NHL experience as an assistant for many years.

And then there’s longtime NHLer Kevin Dineen, who was thought to be in line for the Columbus job, but whom many believe deserves a shot at a head-coaching gig. He’s currently the coach in Portland of the AHL.

Burnside also mentioned Craig MacTavish, but I’d like to throw two other names in the hat: Pat Quinn (pictured, on the left) and former St. Louis Blues coach Andy Murray. I already discussed the 66-year-old Quinn’s uphill battle to return to the coaching ranks, but Murray could be a nice fit with the right team.

I could see Murray helping anyone from a scrappy team like the Islanders, a mixed bag like Buffalo or even a defensively porous team like the Devils. He might even be the second best option behind Hitchcock.

Finally, the last coach to come to mind is Ted Nolan. He might not be an easy guy to work with, but he got a lot out of most of the teams he coached.

Anyway, who do you think would be a good fit for a team that might make a coaching change soon? Let us know in the comments.

Hey, Tortorella called the Penguins whiners again

John Tortorella
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Don’t forget, the Blue Jackets – Penguins rivalry isn’t just about the bitterness between Sidney Crosby and Brandon Dubinsky; John Tortorella can fuel the fire, too.

Torts must not have been happy about the one-game suspension that Dubinsky received for cross-checking Crosby, as he channeled his vintage self in essentially calling the Penguins a bunch of whiners.

You can see from this glorious Sportsnet video, Tortorella said: “Pittsburgh whines enough for the whole league.”

(He also said the Blue Jackets weren’t going to whine by … whining. Good stuff.)

As Puck Daddy notes, this isn’t the first time Torts claimed that the Penguins are whiners.

Both the Blue Jackets and Penguins lost their games on Saturday, but clearly some eyes and ears were still focused on their last confrontation.

In case you’re wondering, the two teams next face off in Pittsburgh on Dec. 21.


Scary moment: Carlo Colaiacovo hospitalized with ‘dented trachea’


Buffalo Sabres defenseman Carlo Colaiacovo has experienced plenty of bad injury luck in his winding career, but Saturday presented one of his worst scares.

As you can see from the video above, Colaiacovo received a scary cross-check from Viktor Arvidsson of the Nashville Predators, who received a major penalty and game misconduct.

Sabres head coach Dan Bylsma said that Colaiacovo was hospitalized with a “dented trachea” yet is OK, the Buffalo News’ John Vogl reports.

Frightening stuff from an eventual 4-1 Sabres win.

PHT will keep an eye out for additional updates regarding Colaiacovo’s health (and a possible suspension for Arvidsson).

Comeback Kings: Gaborik pulls L.A. past Kane, Blackhawks

Jake Muzzin, Scott Darling

Patrick Kane set an American scoring record, and added another assist to make it more impressive, but the Los Angeles Kings just wouldn’t be denied.

In the end, Marian Gaborik‘s big night meant more than Kane’s; he scored the tying and then overtime game-winner, both assisted by Anze Kopitar, for a rousing 4-3 overtime Kings win.

Gaborik’s first goal:

And here’s video of the OT-GWG:

Noticing a theme tonight? Yeah, it’s been an evening in which it’s dangerous to assume a lead would stand.

With that, the Kings stick to the No. 1 spot in the Pacific Division, but Chicago shouldn’t feel all bad. The Blackhawks were able to piece together a decent run during their dreaded “circus trip.”

Patrick Kane’s streak hits 19 games, setting a new American record


When it comes to point streaks for U.S.-born NHL players, Patrick Kane now stands alone.

With a power-play goal early in Saturday’s Blackhawks – Kings game, Kane extended his streak to 19 games, breaking a tie with Phil Kessel and Eddie Olczyk (who finished with at least a point in 18 straight).

As of this writing, Kane has 11 goals and 19 assists during this 19-game streak. He also leads the NHL in scoring.

Bobby Hull’s 21-game point streak stands as the Chicago Blackhawks’ overall team record, by the way.