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Coaches-in-waiting most likely to land next open NHL job

In the last few days, we discussed Ron Wilson’s shaky hold on the Toronto Maple Leafs coaching position and also analyzed the danger Scott Gordon, John MacLean, Lindy Ruff and Randy Carlyle might be in.

(It seems like Carlyle is safe for the moment, but at the time, he was in serious trouble.)

Yet with all that analysis and speculation, we haven’t spoken much about the coaches who might replace them.

ESPN’s Scott Burnside took a look at some of the leading candidates for a potential job opening today. Here is a snippet.

We have to start with Ken Hitchcock. His résumé includes a Stanley Cup in Dallas and two Olympic gold medals as an assistant in 2002 and 2010. While offense isn’t necessarily his forte, he’s tactically terrific and defensively among the best. And he’s got instant credibility for teams looking for just that.

Hitchcock seems like a natural fit for the New Jersey Devils, a historically defensive-minded franchise mostly stocked with veteran players. He might still get under some players’ skin, but maybe that’s a good thing?

Running a close second will be Michel Therrien and Bob Hartley. We put the two French Canadian coaches together not just because they’re long-time pals, but because they bring a measure of old-school “beat them in the alley” mentality with their top organizational skills.

Therrien seems like a good “transitional” coach – he helped the Pittsburgh Penguins grow from cellar dwellers to legitimate contenders – while Hartley owns a Cup. I’m not sure if Hartley is that special, though. He almost seemed like a hockey world answer to Barry Switzer in that it seemed like anyone could help that talent-rich Colorado Avalanche team win a Cup.

In the minors, what about Don Lever, who won an AHL championship in Hamilton and is now coaching the AHL Chicago Wolves? He’s had NHL experience as an assistant for many years.

And then there’s longtime NHLer Kevin Dineen, who was thought to be in line for the Columbus job, but whom many believe deserves a shot at a head-coaching gig. He’s currently the coach in Portland of the AHL.

Burnside also mentioned Craig MacTavish, but I’d like to throw two other names in the hat: Pat Quinn (pictured, on the left) and former St. Louis Blues coach Andy Murray. I already discussed the 66-year-old Quinn’s uphill battle to return to the coaching ranks, but Murray could be a nice fit with the right team.

I could see Murray helping anyone from a scrappy team like the Islanders, a mixed bag like Buffalo or even a defensively porous team like the Devils. He might even be the second best option behind Hitchcock.

Finally, the last coach to come to mind is Ted Nolan. He might not be an easy guy to work with, but he got a lot out of most of the teams he coached.

Anyway, who do you think would be a good fit for a team that might make a coaching change soon? Let us know in the comments.

Sharks finally solve Gibson in OT to defeat rival Ducks

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Talk about perfect timing.

Marc-Edouard Vlasic scored his first goal of the season on Tuesday, doing so in overtime to lift the San Jose Sharks past the goaltending of John Gibson in a 2-1 victory over the Anaheim Ducks.

Facing off against their California rivals for the first time this season, the Sharks dominated puck possession and on the shot clock. Had it not been for the play of Gibson, this one could’ve been a lopsided win for San Jose.

Gibson replaced Jonathan Bernier to begin the second period. Bernier left the game with an upper-body injury.

In relief, Gibson made 24 saves on 25 shots. Vlasic was the only San Jose player to get the puck past him, but not before the Ducks managed to steal a single point.

The Ducks recorded the single point, but did so faced with a short-handed lineup as the game continued. Not only did Bernier leave the game, but so, too, did Ryan Getzlaf, who didn’t play a shift in the third period.

He left with an upper-body injury, as per the Ducks, who at the time listed his return as questionable.

Elliott backstops Flames to victory in his return to St. Louis

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 24: Matt Stajan #18 and Lance Bouma #17 of the Calgary Flames congratulate Brian Elliott #1 after a shootout win against the Chicago Blackhawks at the United Center on October 24, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Flames defeated the Blachawks 3-2 in a shootout. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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So, it seems Jake Allen was onto something.

The St. Louis Blues goalie noted a few days ago that Calgary Flames fans shouldn’t be worried about Brian Elliott despite his early-season struggles.

Well, Elliott has since put together strong performances in back-to-back games against Central Division opponents from Chicago and then St. Louis.

After earning a shootout win over the Blackhawks on Monday, Elliott was put back in the Calgary net to finish off the back-to-back road set.

Facing his former team, Elliott made 23 saves on 24 shots and the Flames recorded a 4-1 victory. It was a special return to St. Louis for Elliott, who spent five seasons with the Blues.

“I saw that on the schedule from a while ago in the summer,” Elliott told “You want to come back here. I had so much fun playing in front of these fans in this building and wanted to do it again even though it was another team. The guys did a heck of a job in front of me to get that win for me.”

Not a bad trip for the Flames, with a maximum four points against two teams considered to be contenders in the Western Conference.

“I thought we were good in front of him, too,” Flames coach Glen Gulutzan told the Calgary Herald. “I thought we kept a lot of the stuff to the outside, but he made some big saves, especially at the end, when we knew their push was coming.

“I thought that was when he was his best. And that’s what you need — we put ourselves in position to win and then he carried us through.”

Bernier (upper-body injury) gives way to Gibson in Ducks net

GLENDALE, AZ - OCTOBER 01:  Goaltender Jonathan Bernier #1 of the Anaheim Ducks during the preseason NHL game against Arizona Coyotes at Gila River Arena on October 1, 2016 in Glendale, Arizona. The Coyotes defeated the Ducks 3-2 in overtime.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Anaheim Ducks goalie John Gibson began Tuesday’s game on the bench, but was forced into action to begin the second period against the San Jose Sharks.

Jonathan Bernier, who got the start, left the game with an upper-body injury and was doubtful to return, the Ducks stated on Twitter.

Bernier has played in only one other game for Anaheim so far, making 42 saves on 45 shots in a loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Oct. 15.

‘Dig in there with the rest of the guys,’ says Babcock after leaving Andersen in against Bolts

OTTAWA, ON - OCTOBER 12: In his first game as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs Frederik Andersen #31 puts his mask on against the Ottawa Senators at Canadian Tire Centre on October 12, 2016 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)
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Frederik Andersen‘s difficult start to the season continues.

After an interesting exchange when questioned about his goaltender prior to Tuesday’s game against the visiting Tampa Bay Lightning and some guy named Steven Stamkos, Toronto Maple Leafs coach Mike Babcock was once again forced to answer inquiries about the play of Andersen, who allowed seven goals on just 24 shots.

Andersen stayed in the crease for the entire game, as the Leafs lost 7-3. He certainly didn’t get much help in the defensive end from his teammates in front of him.

Stamkos started the scoring for Tampa Bay, and continued it with a rocket one-timer past Andersen, before finishing with a four-point night.

But in Toronto, the conversation about the amazing play of rookies like Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner seems to have shifted to the play of their goalie, acquired in a blockbuster deal with Anaheim, in which Toronto parted ways with a first- and second-round pick to make it happen. The Leafs then signed him to a five-year, $25 million deal.

Playing on a new team in a hockey-crazed market has likely been an adjustment. His season also started with an injury in Olympic qualifying.

Following the loss Tuesday, Babcock explained his reasoning for leaving Andersen in net for all seven Tampa Bay goals, two of which came late in the third period.

“I want him to play. He’s my guy. I want him to play,” said Babcock, as per Jonas Siegel of The Canadian Press. “So I could pull him and then say, ‘Okay I showed you!’ But what did I show him? To me, dig in there with the rest of the guys, make the next save and give us a chance to come back and win the game. You can’t do that sitting on the bench.”

The Maple Leafs face the Florida Panthers on Thursday. Florida’s goalie Roberto Luongo knows all-too-well about the pressures that come with playing the position in a Canadian market.

It is early in Andersen’s Toronto tenure.

But Babcock will likely be facing a similar line of questioning until his goalie turns it around.