Opening games in Finland just beginning of Carolina Hurricanes' brutal October schedule


Hockey experts break down player additions and subtractions, goaltending, overall team talent, coaching and various other attributes. Yet when people make predictions or judge teams, it seems like a club’s schedule rarely gets the attention it deserves.

The Carolina Hurricanes must be happy they took the maximum four points out of their European vacation, because their schedule might get even tougher over the next few weeks. They play their next five games on the road, play one other contest in New York and their two October home games are against Stanley Cup favorites Pittsburgh and Washington. Here is a screen shot of that brutal schedule from the Hurricanes official Web site.


Jeez, did the Hurricanes make some enemies in the scheduling office? Joe Corvo was incredulous about the team’s start, as you can read about in the article.

No, it is ridiculous,” Corvo told when the topic of the Hurricanes’ schedule upon their return from Finland was brought up. “From the start here (in Helsinki) to the West Coast trip and then to starting at home against Washington and Pittsburgh, it’s just like, how much can you guys handle in one month?

“It’s going to be a test. A mental test more than anything else.”

The key, though, is to note the article’s “having said that” paragraph regarding where the Hurricanes’ schedule will be soft during the 2010-11 season.

Sure, they get 16 of their final 24 games of the season at home, and that could be fruitful timing for a team that figures to be in the pack chasing a playoff spot all season, but the Hurricanes can’t look that far down the tunnel for the light right now.

Getting those four points in Finland is huge, though. If Carolina could get hot in October, they’ll put themselves in a great position to make the playoffs – and maybe make a run at the division title – by earning those tough points while they’re fresh and then they can take advantage of the softer parts of their schedule.

Either way, it’s a tough start to the season, but if the team can not only survive but thrive under that pressure, they could end up with a gem of a 2010-11 season.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.