Rounding up today's roster cuts

With teams paring down their rosters to prepare for the start of the regular season on Thursday, getting the last round of roster cuts can provide some fascinating results. Today was no different across the NHL and here’s your tour of links to show you some of what went down.

nazemkadri1.jpgToronto sends down Kadri, Caputi, and Hanson

A lot of attention was paid to what the Leafs would do roster-wise and sending down Luca Caputi, Nazem Kadri, and Christian Hanson gives a guy like Tim Brent the chance to start in the NHL. With Matt Lashoff and Brett Lebda both on the injured list, the Leafs roster isn’t completely finished, but opting to start those three players in the AHL is certainly getting noticed. The fact is, none of those three proved they deserved a spot and until then, they can get better in the AHL. As it is, all three players are still incredibly young. They’ll get their time eventually.

Edmonton cuts eight players but no goalies… Yet

So you thought Jeff Deslauriers or Devan Dubnyk would be put on waivers. Turns out that didn’t happen today but they did send, among others, Liam Reddox, Alexandre Giroux and Linus Omark down to the AHL. Omark isn’t very pleased about being sent down, calling the demotion “political.” I believe this tactic of showing the team who’s boss comes from the book, “How To Not Impress Your Boss.”

jeremymorin1.jpgChicago sends down Jeremy Morin

The young winger obtained from the Atlanta Thrashers in the off-season came very close to winning a spot out of training camp. He showed flashes of brilliance and a knack for the net, but it was not meant to be just yet for Morin. Viktor Stalberg will instead get the job in Chicago. With the Hawks worries on defense after Brian Campbell’s knee injury, they’ll be carrying extra help there including 19 year-old Nick Leddy.

Kings waive Erik Ersberg and Rich Clune

Clune isn’t the big deal here as Ersberg was Jon Quick’s backup last year. Now with prospect Jonathan Bernier signing a two-year extension and winning the backup job out of camp, Ersberg could be ticketed to go back to Manchester if he’s not snagged on waivers. Ersberg did all right in a backup job last year, but Bernier is clearly targeted to be the man of the future in Los Angeles. Ersberg could be useful to another team. One team that won’t be, apparently, is Nashville as Predators head coach Barry Trotz stated that the team has no interest in him.

severinblindenbacher1.jpgDallas sends four players down, kill our dream of greatest name in NHL

The Stars sent down training camp hero Aaron Gagnon as well as Philip Larsen, Thomas Vincour and Swiss Olympic star Severin Blindenbacher. Blindenbacher had a solid camp for the Stars, but alas, our dream of seeing and hearing the name “Blindenbacher” in the NHL is on hold. We can only hope that when he does get the call in the NHL that Stars color commentator Daryl Reaugh can give us some fantastically colorful language in which to discuss his play. After all, he’s already given Philip Larsen the nickname of “Lego” for his Danish heritage. Can we get a nickname of “Toblerone” for Severin Blindenbacher here? Corporate synergy here, people. He’s Swiss, Toblerone is a legendary Swiss chocolate. Let’s make magic happen. 

Vancouver’s Shane O’Brien and Darcy Hordichuk clear waivers

With a glut of defensemen and a ton of depth, the Canucks had to make room somehow and clearing out a pair of penalty-prone enforcer types made the job a bit easier for GM Mike Gillis and coach Alain Vigneault. You feel bad for the players, but for the team, to have the sort of depth where cutting these guys makes it OK is pretty fantastic.

Scroll Down For:

    Cullen explains why he chose Wild over Penguins

    Getty
    Leave a comment

    If you check out a bio on Matt Cullen, you’ll notice that he’s from Minnesota. It doesn’t take a leak, then, to explain why Cullen signed a one-year deal with the Minnesota Wild on Wednesday.

    As Cullen explained to Michael Russo of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, “this is a family decision.” As he goes deeper into his logic, even especially sore Pittsburgh Penguins fans should probably understand Cullen’s perspective.

    “Minnesota is home and it’s a special place for me,” Cullen said. “It’s not easy to say goodbye and it’s not easy to walk away [from Pittsburgh]. I’m confident in the decision we’re making and it’s the right thing for our family. But at the same time, it’s not an easy one.

    Now, to be fair, Cullen also told Russo that he believes the Wild are a “hungry” team that might have been the West’s best in 2016-17. It’s not like he’s roughing it, and surely the $1 million (and $700K in performance bonuses that Wild GM Chuck Fletcher hopes Cullen collects) didn’t hurt, either.

    Still, such a decision makes extra sense for a 40-year-old who’s played for eight different NHL teams during his impressive career. Russo’s story about Cullen attending his kids games and seeing his brothers is worth a read just for those warm and fuzzy feelings we often forget about in crunching the numbers and pondering which teams might be big-time contenders in 2017-18.

    This isn’t to say that getting a fourth Stanley Cup ring wouldn’t be appealing to Cullen, but perhaps he’ll get his family time and win big, too?

    There’s also the familiarity that comes with playing three fairly recent seasons with the Wild, so Cullen’s choice seems like it checks a lot of the boxes.

    In other positive Wild news, Russo reports that Eric Staal is feeling 100 percent after suffering a concussion during the playoffs.

    Tuesday was Wild day at PHT, but perhaps this feels more like Wild week?

    Bovada gives McDavid higher odds than Crosby to win Hart in 2017-18

    Getty
    2 Comments

    In handing Connor McDavid an eight-year, $100 million extension, the Edmonton Oilers essentially are paying the 20-year-old star based on the assumption that he’ll provide MVP-quality play.

    At least one Vegas oddsmaker agrees, as Bovada tabbed McDavid as the favorite to win the Hart Trophy, edging Sidney Crosby.

    That’s interesting, yet it might be even more interesting to note where other players fall in the rankings. Auston Matthews coming in third is particularly intriguing.

    Who are some of the more interesting choices? The 20/1 range seems appealing, as Carey Price is one of the few goalies with the notoriety to push for such honors while John Tavares has the skill and financial motivation to produce the best work of his career next season.

    Anyway, entertain yourself with those odds, via Bovada: (Quick note: Bovada originally had Artemi Panarin listed as still playing with Chicago. PHT went ahead and fixed that in the bit below.)

    2017 – 2018 – Who will win the Hart Memorial Trophy as the NHL’s Most Valuable Player?
    Connor McDavid (EDM)                         3/2
    Sidney Crosby (PIT)                              5/2
    Auston Matthews (TOR)                         17/2
    Alex Ovechkin (WAS)                            9/1
    Patrick Kane (CHI)                                 14/1
    Vladimir Tarasenko (STL)                       15/1
    Evgeni Malkin (PIT)                                16/1
    Carey Price (MON)                                 20/1
    John Tavares (NYI)                                20/1
    Jamie Benn (DAL)                                 25/1
    Steven Stamkos (TB)                             25/1
    Erik Karlsson (OTT)                               33/1
    Nikita Kucherov (TB)                              33/1
    Jack Eichel (BUF)                                  50/1
    Ryan Getzlaf (ANA)                               50/1
    Patrik Laine (WPG)                                50/1
    Brad Marchand (BOS)                            50/1
    Tyler Seguin (DAL)                                50/1
    Nicklas Backstrom (WAS)                      60/1
    Brent Burns (SJ)                                    60/1
    Braden Holtby (WAS)                            60/1
    Phil Kessel (PIT)                                    60/1
    Artemi Panarin (CBJ)                              60/1
    Joe Pavelski (SJ)                                  60/1

    Oilers cap situation is scary, and not just because of Draisaitl, McDavid

    Getty
    3 Comments

    The Edmonton Oilers pulled the trigger – and likely made teams with big RFA headaches like the Boston Bruins grimace – in signing Leon Draisaitl to a massive eight-year, $68 million contract on Wednesday.

    You have to do a little stretching to call it a good deal, although credit Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshysnki with some reasonably stated optimism.

    Either way, the per-year cap bill for Connor McDavid and Draisaitl is $21 million once McDavid’s extension kicks in starting in 2018-19; that’s the same combined cost that Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane receive … and those two got those paydays after they won three Stanley Cups for the Chicago Blackhawks.

    Now, if the Oilers struggle in the near future, plenty of people will heap blame on McDavid and/or Draisaitl. Really, though, the true scapegoats should be a management team with more strikeouts than homers.

    (As usual, Cap Friendly was a key resource in studying Edmonton’s salary structure.)

    Bloated supporting cast

    There are some frightening contracts on the books in Edmonton, especially if a few situations work out unfavorably.

    At 29, there’s severe risk of regression with Milan Lucic, even if he enjoys a more stable second season with Edmonton. He carries a $6M cap hit through 2022-23, so he’ll be on the books for all but two years of Draisaitl’s new deal.

    Kris Russell costs $4.167M during a four-year stretch, and even now, he has plenty of critics. Those complaints may only get louder if, at 30, he also starts to slip from his already debatable spot.

    Andrej Sekera‘s been a useful blueliner, yet there’s some concern that time won’t treat him kindly. He’s dealing with injuries heading into 2017-18, and at 31, there’s always the risk that his best days are behind him. Not great for a guy carrying a $5.5M cap hit through 2020-21.

    One can’t help but wonder if Ryan Nugent-Hopkins might be an odd man out once the shackles of the salary cap really tighten. Just consider how much Edmonton is spending on a limited number of players, and you wonder if the 24-year-old will be deemed too pricey at his $6M clip.

    Yeah, not ideal.

    It’s not all bad

    Now, let’s be fair.

    RNH could easily grow into being well worth that $6M. Draisaitl may also justify his hefty price tag. McDavid honestly cut the Oilers a relative deal by taking $12.5M instead of the maximum.

    The Oilers also have two quality, 24-year-old defensemen locked up to team-friendly deals: Oscar Klefbom ($4.167M through 2022-23) and Adam Larsson ($4.167M through 2020-21). They need every bargain they can get, and those two figure to fit the bill.

    Crucial future negotiations

    GM Peter Chiarelli’s had a questionable history of getting good deals. He’ll need to get together soon, or the Oilers will really struggle to surround their core with helpful support.

    Cam Talbot is a brilliant bargain at the strangely familiar cap hit of $4.167M, but that value only lasts through 2018-19. After that, he’s eligible to become a UFA, and could be massively expensive if he produces two more strong seasons.

    The bright side is that the Oilers aren’t locked into an expensive goalie, so they can look for deals. That isn’t as sunny a situation if you don’t trust management to have much success in the bargain bin.

    Talbot isn’t the only upcoming expiring contract. The Oilers have serious questions to answer with Darnell Nurse and Ryan Strome. Also, will they need to let Lucic-like winger Patrick Maroon go? Even with mild relief in Mark Fayne‘s money coming off the books, the Oilers might regret this buffet when the bills start piling up next summer.

    ***

    Look, the truth is that management is likely to be propped up by the top-end in Edmonton, particularly in the case of McDavid’s otherworldly skills. As much as that Draisaitl deal looks like an overpay – possibly a massive one – there’s a chance that he lives up to that $8.5M, too.

    It’s not just about those stars, though.

    The Pittsburgh Penguins gained new life by complimenting Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin with the likes of Phil Kessel. The Blackhawks have struggled once they couldn’t afford as much help for Kane and Toews.

    You have to mix your premium items with bargains, and one wonders if the Oilers will be able to spot sufficient value beyond the no-brainer top guys. Their recent history in that area certainly leaves a lot to be desired.

    Cullen signs with Wild, opting against retirement (and Penguins)

    Getty
    7 Comments

    Matt Cullen is going home, but that doesn’t mean that he’s retiring from hockey.

    Instead, the Minnesota native decided to sign a one-year, $1 million deal with the Minnesota Wild. It’s unclear why, precisely, Cullen didn’t ink a deal to try to “threepeat” with the Pittsburgh Penguins.

    The Wild note that his deal also includes $700K in potential performance bonuses.

    This will be the 40-year-old’s second run with the Wild. His first run came from 2010-11 through 2012-13, where he appeared in 193 regular-season games and five postseason contests for Minnesota.

    Cullen managed back-to-back 30+ point seasons with the Penguins while providing useful all-around play as a veteran center. If he can maintain a reasonably high level of play, this gives the Wild quite the solid group down the middle, even with Martin Hanzal gone.