NHL players pick Quebec City as city they'd like NHL to move to

1 Comment

While we’ve gotten caught up on what a big deal it is now for Quebec City to look into getting an NHL team back there, what with their desire to build a new arena and the “Blue March” to rally support for the old days of the Nordiques, it turns out the NHL players might want to go back there too. Adam Proteau of The Hockey News conducted a player survey to find out which city they’d like to have an NHL team call their home and the runaway winner was none other than Quebec City.

According to THN’s latest player poll, Quebec City is the clear choice as deserving of a franchise. Out of 90 players polled, 33 (or 36.7 percent) picked the capital of La Belle Province; Winnipeg was next with 18 votes (20 percent), followed by Las Vegas (12 votes/13.3 percent), Hamilton (11 votes/12.2 percent) and Seattle (five votes/5.6 percent).

Other cities receiving votes were Toronto, Houston and Kansas City (all of which received two votes each) and Stockholm, Prague, Halifax, N.S., Saskatoon, Sask., and the Kitchener-Waterloo region of Ontario (which each garnered one vote.)

It’s interesting to see two former NHL homes in Canada get the call from the players polled as the two favorites. Perhaps it’s a case of familiarity and nostalgia coming into play. Of the following three choices after Quebec City and Winnipeg, two American cities get the call and they’re intriguing to say the least. Las Vegas and Seattle are cities that get thrown into the mix now and again as potential homes for the NHL.

With Hollywood mogul Jerry Bruckheimer always getting the ear of commissioner Gary Bettman, his wont for a team in Vegas will always be there. Seattle is fascinating not just because of their proximity to Vancouver but also because it’s a city that the NBA has abandoned and has rabid fans of their own. Just check out a Seattle Seahawks football game or a Seattle Sounders MLS game for proof.

As for Quebec City, their main problem the first time around for players were taxes and culture there, but Proteau hears from former Nordiques player and current Panthers play-by-play man Randy Moller about what could make it work this time around.

“Winning cures most ailments and that’s the way it was there,” the native Albertan said. “When we were winning, a lot of that stuff was swept under the carpet. But unfortunately, it rears its ugly head – as it does in a lot of places – when the team isn’t winning.

“As long as you respect the French culture and their language – and I did – you’ll be embraced by the people there.”

Winning fixing problems is nothing new at all and one that could’ve worked out well in Quebec City the first time around. It’s too bad they didn’t to do much of that then.

Ducks name Kesler alternate captain

Ryan Kesler
Leave a comment

For the second time in his career, Ryan Kesler is wearing an “A.”

On Thursday, the Anaheim Ducks announced that Kesler would serve as one of the club’s alternate captains this season, taking over for Francois Beauchemin, who signed in Colorado this summer.

With the move, Kesler joins Anaheim’s existing leadership group of captain Ryan Getzlaf, and alternate Corey Perry.

“It’s an honor,” Kesler said, per the Ducks. “It’s special. I’m going to wear it with pride and lead by example.”

As mentioned earlier, Kesler has some experience as an alternate — he wore an “A” in Vancouver from 2008-13, but had it removed prior to the start of the ’13-14 campaign.

It’s not surprising Anaheim went in this direction. GM Bob Murray made a huge investment in Kesler this summer by inking the 31-year-old to a six-year, $41.25M extension.

Diaz could leave Rangers for Europe

Raphael Diaz, Mike Sislo
Leave a comment

Could Raphael Diaz be on his way back to Switzerland?

We’ll know in a month.

Diaz, who lost out on the Rangers’ final blueline spot in training camp, has reported to the club’s AHL affiliate in Hartford but doesn’t seem pleased with his current situation, per the Post:

The 29-year-old Diaz, who cleared waivers last Saturday after the Blueshirts opted to keep rookie Dylan McIlrath as the club’s seventh on the blue line, is interested in the European option if he is not in the NHL.

The Blueshirts have told Diaz they will revisit the situation at the end of October, but have not promised to release him or assign him to a European team at that point.

If Diaz, a Swiss native who represented Switzerland in the 2014 Olympics, does play in Europe during the season, he would have to go through waivers in order to return to the NHL.

Diaz’s agent, Ritch Winter, told the Post that Diaz signed a one-year, $700,000 deal with the Rangers “to play with the Rangers.”

And it’s understandable if Diaz — a journeyman offensive defenseman — isn’t happy with this situation.

While some believe McIlrath earned his roster spot on merit, some think it’s because of his contract status. McIlrath, who’s only 23 and a former first-round pick, would’ve needed to clear waivers to go back to Hartford, and it’s believed he would’ve been claimed by another club.