Steven Stamkos among 25 players who endured Gary Roberts' off-season training regimen


stamkosyear3.jpgProfessional athletes are always looking for an “edge.” In hockey, it could be adjusting the way you attack on the forecheck or the curve on your stick.

Yet, with a lot of people in sports, one thing goes unnoticed: a player’s diet. (Braces for a round of Kyle Wellwood/Martin Brodeur jokes.)

TSN’s James Duthie wrote an interesting piece regarding Gary Roberts’ boot camp in which the former power forward put 25 players including Steven Stamkos, Cody Hodgson, Steve Downie and Mike del Zotto. The workout routine made sense for Roberts – a guy who received the Chuck Norris joke treatment during his brief time with the Pittsburgh Penguins – but the importance of wise eating was the most “unique” lesson.

Roberts then worked with the chefs at Nature’s Emporium to design a full summer menu for his troops. Every meal they ate had to meet his approval.

“It was a big adjustment,” says Stamkos. “The first two weeks we started the program, your body is not just used to that type of food. You are used to laying on the mayo, the ranch dressing. It was depressing at first. But once my body got used to it, it was fine. The food was great. I didn’t know what some of it was, but it was unbelievable. There was this mango parfait I still crave.”

Michael Del Zotto, a good Italian boy used to his lasagna and chicken parm, struggled the most.

“Michael was the pickiest,” says Roberts with a chuckle. “He’d text me and say, ‘Holy Crap what was that green stuff in my sandwich?’. I said, ‘Those are sprouts Michael.’ One time I got him excited telling him he was getting spaghetti. I didn’t tell him it was actually zucchini, shredded like spaghetti.”

Downie loved the food so much, he sent his girlfriend to Nature’s Emporium for a two-day training course with the chefs. He wanted her to be able to make it all season in Tampa.

garyroberts.jpgThe results were tangible, too. Colorado Avalanche prospect Cameron Gaunce lost 15 lbs., cut his body fat down to six percent and won the team’s fitness test this summer. Stamkos turned heads after Roberts’ regimen while Hodgson helped himself in his recovery thanks to some of the habits he picked up from Roberts.

Of course, you have to wonder if the young players will slip when they’re not under Roberts’ watchful stink eye (a good example of that death stare can be found in the photo to the right).

For now, class is dismissed. But careful boys, Big Brother is always watching.

“The other night I was playing in Edmonton and you guys showed me on TSN wolfing down popcorn,” says Stamkos. “Right away I get a text from Robs: ‘Stammer, lay off the popcorn!’ I told him, ‘Don’t worry, it’s organic.”

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick
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Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.