Dennis Wideman seeks redemption in Florida after tough year in Boston

GYI0060279209-wideman-elsa-getty.jpgIt can be tough to be traded as it’s always a major disruption in a player’s life and his career. For a guy like Dennis Wideman, it may have come as a blessing in disguise. Last year, the offensively-talented Wideman had some growing pains dealing with the playoff-anxious Bruins. Bruins fans were about as bi-polar in their treatment of Wideman as we’ve seen with any player in recent memory. No player went from goat, to hero, back to goat again as seamlessly as Dennis Wideman seemed to with the Bruins.

During the summer, Wideman was shipped to Florida in the Nathan Horton trade and for him, the disruption hasn’t dissuaded his attitude towards playing and tells The Boston Globe’s Fluto Shinzawa that he’s ready to go and continue improving in Florida.

“Last year wasn’t one of my better years,” he said. “There were a lot of guys who didn’t have very good years last year. Mine, it just seemed, got shone upon a little brighter. That’s the way it goes sometimes.”

As there are questions about work ethic with Horton, there are warts to Wideman’s game. When he struggled with his confidence last season, pucks bobbled off his stick. He lost his footing retrieving pucks. Forwards blew past him to create scoring chances.

But just as there is promise to Horton’s game, the Panthers recognized Wideman’s ceiling. In last year’s playoffs, Wideman led the Bruins in scoring with 1 goal and 11 assists, while averaging 26:02 of ice time.

“I think the last stretch run, I think I was almost a point a game in the last 20-25 games of the year,” Wideman said. “Things just finally got better then. I started feeling good. Confidence was good. Things started getting better and better, then I had a good playoff run.”

There’s no doubt that Florida is going to have their handfuls of trouble this year. They’re solid in goal, they’ve got one stellar scoring line and yet Bryan McCabe is still their captain and their best defenseman. Things drop off pretty hard for the Panthers from there, but if they can get a confident Wideman out there, it would give them a guy capable of playing solid on the power play and give the Panthers just a little bit more depth and a guy who can be a step above being a role player on the blue line.

Mind you, the Panthers figure to still be rough around the edges, but at least if Wideman pans out they can hold this moral victory over the Bruins’ heads. Hey, you have to win at something these days, right?

(Photo: Elsa – Getty Images)

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    Anderson, Cogliano, Ryan named 2017 Masterton nominees

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    The PHWA announced the three finalists for the NHL’s 2017 Bill Masterton Trophy: Craig Anderson, Andrew Cogliano and Derek Ryan.

    As a reminder, the award is for “the player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.”

    Ryan distinguished himself as a 29-year-old who battled his way to time in the NHL, managing a goal in his debut game with the Carolina Hurricanes.

    Cogliano stands out as one of the “iron men” of the NHL for the Anaheim Ducks. The PHWA notes that he’s never missed a game in his career, managing a streak of 779 games.

    Finally, there’s Anderson, who managed an impressive season in net for the Ottawa Senators while his wife Nicholle battles a rare form of throat cancer. That emotional story continued after Anderson backstopped the Senators in beating the Boston Bruins in the first round.

    Marleau says he wants to return to Sharks, but it might not be so easy

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    It seemed strangely fitting that Patrick Marleau scored the final goal of the San Jose Sharks’ season as the Edmonton Oilers eliminated them in Game 6.

    Monday presented questions about what that goal means.

    For one thing, it definitely doesn’t sound like Marleau expects that to be his final goal in the NHL, as he believes he has “at least five good years in me, or maybe more,” according to NBC Sports California’s Kevin Kurz.

    “I still think I can contribute and play,” Marleau said. “Until I think I can’t do that anymore, I’ll cross that bridge when we get there.”

    The 37-year-old made a strong argument that he can still light up the lamp in 2016-17. He scored 27 goals and 46 points during the regular season and ended his playoff run with three goals and an assist (all in the final three contests vs. Edmonton).

    Marleau was especially effective once the new year rolled around, collecting 29 points in his last 41 games.

    Before we get to the more unpleasant stuff, let’s watch that last goal:

    So … yeah, that’s a pretty convincing case that he can at least still play now.

    The bigger question is: if Marleau really wants term, are the Sharks willing to give him what he’s looking for?

    Marleau admitted that discussions on an extension haven’t even happened yet. When you consider the upcoming challenges for San Jose, you wonder if this is it for a player who’s suited up for a whopping 1,493 regular season games with the franchise (even after there were significant trade rumors over the years).

    Marc-Edouard Vlasic‘s outstanding value $4.25 million cap hit evaporates after 2017-18, and the same can be said for Martin Jones‘ $3 million mark. One could imagine the Sharks approaching Marleau with a very appealing one-year offer, but it would be a big leap to imagine the franchise going for a guy who’s approaching 40 instead of a solid starting goalie and one of the best pure defensemen in the NHL.

    So, really, the question isn’t “Will Marleau really play for five more years?” Instead, it might be “Does Marleau value playing for the Sharks enough to take a shorter deal or does he want that term right now?”

    What is Alex Galchenyuk’s future in Montreal?

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    Alex Galchenyuk is already a good player.

    The question for the Montreal Canadiens is, can he be great?

    Galchenyuk, the third overall draft pick in 2012, is coming off a decent regular season with 17 goals and 27 assists in 61 games. However, it wasn’t as good as last year’s 30-goal campaign, and he didn’t score a single goal in the playoffs.

    “Hopefully he took a step back this year so he can take two forward next year,” GM Marc Bergevin said Monday at the Canadiens’ season-ending press conference.

    Three assists were all Galchenyuk could manage in six games against the Rangers. More importantly, after more than 300 NHL games of experience, the 23-year-old is still not an everyday center, on a team where center depth is by far the biggest concern.

    Habs defenseman Shea Weber thinks Galchenyuk still has a ton of potential.

    “I think we’ve seen glimpses of it,” Weber said, per NHL.com’s Arpon Basu, “but I don’t think he’s tapped into how good he can be. One day he’s going to realize it, like all young guys do, he’s going to get it.”

    Of course, not all young guys do get it. And at times, there have been questions about Galchenyuk’s competitiveness.

    To play center in the NHL, you have to compete all over the ice.

    “Ideally, we would love to have him play center,” head coach Claude Julien said. “But I think he realizes the same thing we realize right now. As a centerman, it’s one of the toughest jobs there is because you have to be all over the ice, and you’ve got to be able to skate. As a centerman, you have to be good at both ends of the ice, and you have to be responsible. Right now, he’s not at that stage.”

    The kicker in all this is that Galchenyuk can become a restricted free agent this summer. He’s already signed one bridge deal, and he’s at the age now where many young stars sign for big money and a long term.

    So, does he want to sign long term in Montreal?

    He ducked the question today.

    “My season just ended a couple of days ago,” Galchenyuk told reporters. “I honestly didn’t give it too much of a thought yet.”

    Kunitz cleared for contact, available for start of Caps series

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    The Pens may get back one of their most veteran skaters for their second-round series against Washington.

    Chris Kunitz, who missed the last five regular season games and all of Pittsburgh’s Round 1 win over Columbus, has been cleared for contact (per the Tribune-Review) and could return from his lower-body ailment for Thursday’s opener at Verizon.

    Kunitz, 37, finished the year with nine goals and 29 points in 71 games, averaging 15:31 TOI per night. It was a down season offensively, but the Pens are hopeful he can reclaim some of the form shown last spring, when he racked up 12 points in 24 games en route to the title.

    A three-time Cup winner, Kunitz skated on the fourth line at today’s practice with Matt Cullen and Tom Kuhnackl.

    In other health news, the Pens also declared d-man Chad Ruhwedel a game-time decision for Thursday, after he was sidelined with an upper-body injury. Carl Hagelin, out with a lower-body ailment, has continued skating and head coach Mike Sullivan said the team is hopeful Hagelin can play at some point against Washington.