The sad story of Mark Wells selling his 'Miracle on Ice' gold medal


Although there are occasions such as Reggie Bush and O.J. Simpson losing trophies for off-the-field issues, you’ll rarely see an athlete give up the symbol of their greatest achievements easily. Usually, it’s the exclamation point at the end of a very sad story.

Life hasn’t been easy for Mark Wells since he helped the U.S. Olympic hockey team win the 1980 gold medal during the famous “Miracle on Ice” run. A degenerative illness left him bedridden for decades, forcing him to sell off that medal to help pay for his expenses. The Boston Herald has more on the sad story and the impending sale.

His medal – the only one from the Miracle team to ever hit the resale market – is expected to go for more than $100,000 according to Phil Castinetti of SportsWorld in Saugus who is handling the sale.

“I’m thinking it will bring in six figures – probably around $125,000,” Castinetti told the Track. “It’s the only one that’s ever surfaced, and there’s only 20 of them.”


After Wells sold the medal, it was purchased by a Connecticut collector who has turned it over to Castinetti to see what he can get for it.

BTW, this year marks the 30th anniversary of Team USA’s victory over the big bad Soviets and their subsequent win over Finland to grab the gold at Lake Placid. Hence, the sale.

That’s a sad, sad story as it’s pretty clear that Wells isn’t selling the gold medal to install a home theater system in his home or something (at least I assume it would be to pay off problematic medical bills and the like).

I’ve never completely understood the logic of collectors, especially if it’s in the area of a sweaty game-worn jersey or a baseball that just happened to leave Barry Bonds’ bat. That being said, I can understand the allure of a gold medal from the 80s Olympic run. For one thing, it’s remembered even by hockey-indifferent sports fans as one of the greatest American athletic moments ever. Beyond that, it’s a freaking gold medal. That’s much cooler than a random object coincidentally used by an athlete, at least in my opinion.

Anyway, it’s an unfortunate story, but hopefully whatever money Wells made will help him keep things together. The people he sold it to are likely to make even more cash.

(H/T to Puck Daddy.)

Slepyshev earns final Oilers roster spot; Draisaitl to AHL

Anton Slepyshev, Anton Lander
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The Edmonton Oilers have assigned center Leon Draisaitl to AHL Bakersfield.

The demotion of Draisaitl, 19, means 21-year-old rookie Anton Slepyshev has made the opening-day roster after scoring twice and adding two assists in exhibition action.

The Oilers experimented during the preseason with Draisaitl, a natural center, on the wing. He didn’t have a particularly poor camp, finishing with one goal and three assists in six games.

But Slepyshev apparently impressed more.

“He’s a young player but he’s played pro hockey before,” coach Todd McLellan told the Edmonton Journal. “You can see it.”

Slepyshev played 58 games in the KHL last season, scoring 15 goals for Salavat Yulaev Ufa.

Canucks roll the dice on rookies, waive Vey and Corrado

Jared McCann, Connor McDavid, Ben Hutton

A preseason push by a number of Vancouver Canucks youngsters has left forward Linden Vey and defenseman Frank Corrado on waivers today.

The more surprising name of the two is Corrado, the 22-year-old who entered the season with an excellent chance of making the opening-day roster. However, it seems that rookie d-man Ben Hutton, 22, has been given the nod after finishing an eye-opening preseason with one goal and four assists in seven games. (This despite Hutton being waiver exempt. So it’s a risk for the Canucks, to be sure.)

It was the play of 19-year-old rookie Jared McCann that led, in part, to the waiving of Vey. (For more on that, click here.) Veteran Adam Cracknell remains with the team as well, to some surprise.

Rookie winger Jake Virtanen is also expected to be on Vancouver’s opening-day roster, though that’s no big shock.

Defenseman Alex Biega is also on waivers, as expected.