Pittsburgh Penguins sign GM Ray Shero to 5-year extension; A look at his biggest moves


sherowiththecup.jpgThe Pittsburgh Penguins announced that they signed GM Ray Shero to a five-year extension today.

The Penguins and Shero have agreed on a five-year contract extension that ensures the team’s 2009 Stanley Cup champion architect will remain in Pittsburgh through the 2015-16 season.

“I’d like to thank Mario Lemieux, Ron Burkle and the ownership group for showing confidence in me,” Shero said. “They made a decision to hire me back in May of 2006, and it’s worked out for both of us. The ownership group has supported me and given me the resources to do the job. The stability we get from with our ownership group is how you have success both on and off the ice.

“I wanted to stay here long term. This is a good fit for me and my family.”

Despite the fact that Craig Patrick laid some of the groundwork for the 2009 Stanley Cup winning team, there’s no doubt that Shero helped the team get over the hump once he took over. Shero was a member of the Nashville Predators front office before coming to Pittsburgh and that interest in adding grit and hustle shows; in fact, I’ll look back at the trade that shipped turnover machine Ryan Whitney to Anaheim for forechecking demon Chris Kunitz as the moment the Penguins truly became difficult to play against.

Here’s a quick look at some of the biggest decisions Shero made as the Penguins general manager.

  • Promoting coach Dan Bylsma – You cannot say Michel Therrien was a horrible coach, not after helping the team make the Stanley Cup finals. Still, his message was fading on a young Penguins team, so Shero decided to fire Therrien and bring Bylsma up from the minors. The result: the team made a late surge to the playoffs and a Cup win.
  • Drafting and signing Jordan Staal – Drafting Staal with the No. 2 pick helped the team become one of the league’s strongest up the middle, though I can’t help but wonder if they could have squeezed later draft picks such as Jonathan Toews, Nicklas Backstrom or Phil Kessel into their cap instead.
  • Trade deadline dealings – Landing Marian Hossa and Bill Guerin ranks as some of the best post-lockout deadline deals. Trading for the semi-miserable Alex Ponikarovsky last season? Not so much.
  • He wisely resisted the urge to lock up less essential players (Ryan Malone) as well as guys who are aging (Sergei Gonchar). Instead, he signed young players from Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin to Kris Letang and Marc-Andre Fleury.
  • Signing Paul Martin and Zbynek Michalek to huge deals this off-season will make a big impact on how his next five years will look.

So that’s a quick snapshot of Shero’s time with the Penguins. Will he add another Cup to his resume in the next five years? That much is unclear, but it’s tough to say that the team isn’t in good hands.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards
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The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Kings GM Dean Lombardi ranks among the NHL’s most outspoken executives. Even so, his discussion of what he calls Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.” (Bold claim: the production part was probably the bigger sticking point.)
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the Lombardi and the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick
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Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.