Former hockey player discusses steroid use in the sport

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steroids.jpgMaybe it’s because I’ve never been a big baseball fan – or perhaps it’s because I’ve been lightly brainwashed by the fascinating documentary “Bigger, Stronger, Faster” – but at some point, the steroid issue started making my eyes glaze over in most sports. Looking at the size of some baseball, basketball or football players, I couldn’t help but wonder; the next thing I knew, I couldn’t help but be indifferent.

Hockey’s a little different for two reasons. One reason is that its players would use steroids in ways that wouldn’t give them Barry Bonds-sized skulls so it’s more difficult to speculate on who might be up to no good. The other reason is that the league rarely ever nabs a player for needle-based tomfoolery.

Former hockey player turned excellent blogger Justin Bourne wrote an interesting piece on steroids in hockey for Puck Daddy today. Here’s a snippet of the article, though I encourage that you read it in its entirety.

It’s a thin line between making it and being a step away – and jumping from the AHL to the NHL “moves the decimal,” as players will say. In simple terms, an NHL contract means 10 times as much money – from the AHL minimum $35,000 to the NHL minimum of $500,000. I’d be lying if I said the thought doesn’t cross my mind: “I’ll take a time machine and a needle, thanks.”


Once a guy says “yes” to “should I do a summer cycle to get strong going into camp?” they only need to figure out answers to a few questions that don’t end in strict enough answers:

How long does it take to get out of my system? If I drink some potion before will it flush my system/mask the drugs during the test? Can I be sure nothing will show? Can someone else piss for me? How close do they watch this? Are they taking blood?

And if you’re not in the NHL, none of those questions matter.

Thumbnail image for josecanseco.jpgWhile its not quite on the scandalous scale of Jose Canseco (in the photo to the right) saying he saw Mark McGwire receive shots injected into his buttocks, I’ve rarely heard anyone who involved in hockey discuss the subject of “juicing.” You’d have to think that there are some people doing it in the NHL and beyond by the simple math of the law of averages.

The question is, what would the NHL gain when it comes to increasing testing? Positive drug tests just mean players being suspended, box offices being threatened and PR nightmares set into motion. It’s obvious why the league isn’t exactly tripping over its own feet to strengthen its testing, but Bourne makes the point that such a reluctance isn’t quite right.

‘Yotes return Dylan Strome to OHL

Dylan Strome, Nikita Nikitin
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The Arizona Coyotes have returned Dylan Strome to the Erie Otters of the OHL.

Strome, 18, was the third overall pick in the 2015 NHL draft.

The 6’3, 185 pounder was hoping to stick with the Coyotes this season, but the team decided to take the conservative approach with their top prospect.

Strome will look to build off an incredible junior season that saw him score 45 goals and 129 points in 68 games.

Strome seems to be taking the demotion in stride.

The team also announced that they’ve assigned goaltender Louis Domingue and forward Matthias Plachta to their AHL affiliate in Springfield.

Domingue, 23, had a 1-2-1 record with a 2.73 goals-against-average and a .911 save percentage in seven games last season.

Plachta, a free agent signing, will begin his first pro season in North America. The 24-year-old had 14 goals and 35 points in the German League last season.


Detroit places Datsyuk and three others on I.R.

Pavel Datsyuk,
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The Red Wings have placed Pavel Datsyuk, Darren Helm, Danny DeKeyser and Alexey Marchenko on injured reserve.

Placing these players on I.R. opens up four more roster spots for Detroit.

The Red Wings have suffered an incredibe amount of injuries heading into the season.

Datsyuk (ankle) is expected to be out until November.

DeKeyser (foot) is going to miss three-to-four weeks, while Helm (concussion) and Marchenko (lower-body) are considered day-to-day.

The team also announced that they have reduced their training camp roster to 27 players on Sunday.

Top prospect Dylan Larkin remains in camp for now.

Coach Jeff Blashill told reporters that the 19-year-old has looked good, but a final decision hasn’t been made on where he will play this year.

As for Larkin, he’s just fed up of living in a hotel.

“There’s been so much speculation and so many questions, and no one really knows,” said Larkin. “Maybe the coaches know, but just to find out where I’ll be living or what’s happening — I’m kind of sick of the hotel. It would be nice to know what’s going on.”