NHL releases its rule book changes, we try to translate them to English

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for nhlreferees.jpgThe NHL released alterations to the league’s rule book this weekend and a lot of it reads like, well, legal speak. (Click here to see a detailed list of all the changes.)

That being said, I thought I’d point out some of the most interesting changes, even if we covered many of them throughout the summer. It’s a nice snapshot of the changes that were made by a league that experienced a mostly successful 2009-10 season but has plenty of room to improve. Now, to the bullet points.

  • The rule book reflects the many subtle changes being made to goalie equipment. We were all over this subject earlier this summer, but those tweaks will give you a good idea of the amount of differences. Even if you probably won’t be able to make much of an eye-ball distinction.
  • Want confirmation that hits to the head will be given additional emphasis? There will even be a special signal for the penalty, as described in the new rule book: “Patting flat (open palm) of the non-whistle hand on this side of the head.”
  • An interesting change to what a video goal judge can call a goal. Here’s the explanation, with the intriguing new addition in bold face.

The video review process shall be permitted to assist the referees in determining the legitimacy of all potential goals (e.g. to ensure they are “good hockey goals”). For example (but not limited to), pucks that enter the net by going through the net meshing, pucks that enter the net from underneath the net frame, pucks that enter the net undetected by the referee, etc.

Interesting stuff. I assume that this doesn’t kill the “intent to blow” rule altogether, but it sounds like it gives video judges a little more flexibility. Or it just changes the language of the rule.

  • I haven’t heard of this new rule yet: when a team bats in a goal illegally (for example, scoring with a high stick), the faceoff will take place in the neutral zone instead of the defending team’s zone. This actually seems more fair since you cannot be sure the alternate universe legal version of the play would have resulted in a faceoff in that zone.
  • There are also some changes to the legal sizes of sticks and a few tweaks to protect goalies, but I’ll spare you the details because they’re super specific (and kind of boring).

So that is the Cliff’s Notes version of the rule book changes. Click here if you want more details or want to read the full list. Don’t worry, I won’t judge you for matching my dorkiness.

Torres offered in-person hearing, potentially setting up long suspension

Torres hit
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What will Raffi Torres get this time?

The 33-year-old forward that has become known primarily for his controversial hits has once again put himself in the sights of the NHL’s Department of Players Safety. They confirmed that he was offered an in-person hearing following his hit on Jakub Silfverberg Saturday night. He declined the opportunity to meet with them face-to-face, but the offer itself is an important detail because it gives the league the option to suspend him for more than five games.

It certainly seems like the stage is set for a lengthy suspension. For one thing, Torres is a repeat offender who once was banned from 25 games for his hit on Marian Hossa in 2012, although it was later reduced to 21 contests after an appeal. The NHL found that Torres was guilty of breaking three rules for that hit; namely interference, charging, and illegally hitting the head. The NHL is reviewing Torres’ latest incident for the same three violations.

You can see the hit below:

And here it is slowed down:

Torres got a match penalty and Silfverberg left the game. Fortunately, Ducks coach Bruce Boudreau said that Silfverberg could have returned, but was kept out for precautionary reasons.

Flames acquire Freddie Hamilton, brother of Dougie

Freddie Hamilton
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Roughly three months after acquiring Dougie Hamilton, the Calgary Flames have brought his brother on board too.

Freddie Hamilton was pried away from the Colorado Avalanche for the cost a 2016 conditional seventh-round draft pick, per the Avalanche’s website. The Flames announced that he will report to AHL Stockton.

Freddie, who is the older of the two at 23, is a center that excelled offensively in the OHL and has chipped in at the AHL level. However, he has just one point in 29 contests with Colorado and the San Jose Sharks.

This is obviously not a big trade, but perhaps Freddie will eventually become a solid member of the Flames’ supporting cast. If nothing else, it didn’t cost Calgary much to reunite the brothers. The duo previously played together with the Niagara IceDogs.