NHLPA could take first official steps toward making Donald Fehr their leader today

From an outsider’s perspective, it seems like any move to impede Donald Fehr’s quest to become the head of the NHLPA would just delay the inevitable, but the process still hasn’t technically begun.

Ken Campbell reports that Fehr may finally become an “official” candidate for the job today, though, as the players association is holding another Wednesday conference call.

The coronation of Donald Fehr as executive director of the NHL Players’ Association could receive a significant boost during a conference call this afternoon.

It would mean Fehr, who has been an unpaid advisor with the NHLPA for months and has been coy about his intentions for the top job, could become an official candidate and the frontrunner for the job as early as today.

It’s possible during the call the search committee will formally submit Fehr’s name for the vacant executive director’s job and recommend that he be hired. The executive committee, which is comprised of the 30 player representatives, would then hold a vote on whether or not to put the matter to a ratification vote of the full membership during training camp.

In order for the vote to go to all the players, two-thirds of the player reps on the conference call would have to approve, something that is expected to happen. It’s also expected the players will discuss how the votes among members will be counted, whether or not each player’s vote will count individually or whether each team will vote on Fehr’s candidacy based on the results of the vote among its players.

Campbell wrote that it’s possible that the union could vote on his candidacy during training camp so Fehr would be the head of the players association by the beginning of the 2010-11 season.

James Mirtle followed up on the story and shared his findings on Twitter.

Told there will not necessarily be decision/vote on Fehr today. Definitely a discussion taking place, though.

It might seem like the process is moving along at a glacial place, but it’s all about getting things in order before the Collective Bargaining Agreement runs out after the 2011-12 campaign. Just about everyone outside of the fray is rooting against a lockout or strike at all costs, so Fehr’s name does strike some fear into the hearts of many considering his association with the damaging 1994 Major League Baseball strike.

Still, Fehr has been a part of negotiations that didn’t involve a work stoppage, so it’s probably a bit hasty to play “Taps” for the 2012-13 season. Hopefully everyone involved will be wise enough to realize how crippling another work stoppage would be for anyone associated with the league.

Scroll Down For:

    Red Wings acquire unsigned prospect Sadowy from Sharks

    PHILADELPHIA, PA - JUNE 28:  Dylan Sadowy of the San Jose Sharks poses for a portrait during the 2014 NHL Draft at the Wells Fargo Center on June 28, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)
    Getty
    1 Comment

    The Detroit Red Wings have acquired 20-year-old forward Dylan Sadowy from the San Jose Sharks, in return for a third-round draft pick in 2017.

    Sadowy, the 81st overall pick in 2014, scored 45 goals in the OHL this past season. He had 42 the year before.

    But Sadowy never did sign with the Sharks. The deadline for him to do so was June 1; otherwise, he could’ve re-entered the draft.

    He won’t be doing that, though. According to TSN’s Bob McKenzie, Sadowy has already agreed to terms on an entry-level contract with the Wings.

    It’s been a ‘roller coaster’ — Pens, Bolts ready for Game 7

    TAMPA, FL - MAY 18: Cedric Paquette #13 of the Tampa Bay Lightning checks Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game Three of the Eastern Conference Final during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at the Amalie Arena on May 18, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. The Penguins defeated the Lightning 4-2.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
    Getty
    1 Comment

    PITTSBURGH (AP) Sidney Crosby is in no mood to get caught up in his own personal narrative, the one eager to attach whatever happens to the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals on Thursday against Tampa Bay to the superstar’s legacy.

    Forget that Crosby has the game-winning goal in each of Pittsburgh’s victories in its entertaining back-and-forth with the resilient Lightning. Forget that he hasn’t been on the winning side of a post-series handshake line this deep into the playoffs since his glorious night in Detroit seven years ago, which ended with him hoisting the Penguins’ third Stanley Cup.

    Yes, he’s playing well. Yes, his dazzling, imminently GIF-able sprint through the Tampa Bay zone late in the second period of Game 6 added another signature moment to a career full of them. Yet lifting Pittsburgh back to the Cup final for the first time since 2009 does not rely solely on him so much as the collective effort of all 20 guys in his team’s retro black and Vegas gold uniforms.

    Depth has carried the Penguins this far. Crosby insists Game 7 will be about the team, not him.

    “You give yourself the best chance of winning by keeping it simple and not putting too much emphasis on kind of the story line around it,” Crosby said.

    Even if it’s easy to get lost in those story lines. The Lightning are on the verge of a second straight berth in the final despite playing the entire postseason without captain Steven Stamkos and losing Vezina Trophy finalist Ben Bishop in the first period of the conference finals when he twisted his left leg awkwardly while scrambling to get into position.

    Yet Tampa Bay has stuck around, ceding the ice to the Penguins for significant stretches but using their speed to counterattack brilliantly while relying on 21-year-old goaltender Andrei Vasilevski. The Lightning are hardly intimidated by having to go on the road in a series decider. They did it a year ago in the Eastern final against New York, beating the Rangers 2-0 in Madison Square Garden.

    “You’ve got to go back to a tough environment, just like the Garden was last year,” Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper said. “And you’ve got to have your A-game.”

    The Lightning hoped to avoid revisiting this spot. They could have closed out Pittsburgh at home but fell behind by three goals and didn’t recover, fitting for a series that appears to be a coin flip as a whole but not so much night to night. The team that’s scored first is 5-1 and there’s only been a single lead change in 18-plus periods spread out over nearly two weeks: Tyler Johnson‘s deflection in overtime that gave Tampa Bay Game 5.

    “You always want to play with the lead, and always the first goal is big,” said Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman, who is 7-0 in Game 7s. “But, again, we were down 2-0 in Game 5 and came back from that. So it’s not cut in stone, the outcome of the game, no matter if you’re down a goal or two.”

    Maybe, but it’d be cutting it pretty close. Tampa Bay’s rally in Game 5 was Pittsburgh’s first loss when leading after two periods all year. The Penguins responded by going back to rookie goaltender Matt Murray – who turned 22 on Wednesday – and putting together perhaps their finest hockey of the postseason. Their stars played like stars while Murray performed like a guy a decade older with his name already etched on the Cup a few times.

    The Penguins will need to rely on Murray’s precocious maturity if it wants to buck a curious trend that started well before Murray was born. Pittsburgh hasn’t won a Game 7 on home ice since Mario Lemieux and company beat New Jersey in the opening round of the 1991 playoffs to escape from a 3-2 series deficit and propel the Penguins to their first championship. The Penguins have dropped five straight winner-take-all matchups since then, including a loss to Tampa Bay in the first round in 2011, a series Pittsburgh played without either Crosby or Evgeni Malkin, who sat out with injuries.

    They’re healthy now and showing extended flashes of the form that seemed to have the Penguins on the brink of a dynasty when they toppled Detroit. And the Lightning, who are 5-1 in Game 7s, are hardly comfortable but hardly intimidated as they play on the road.

    “I think it’s a roller coaster,” Cooper said. “But Game 7 is Game 7. There’s no two better words than that.”

    Coyotes ‘thrilled’ to bring assistant coach Newell Brown back

    GLENDALE, AZ - NOVEMBER 12:  Head coach Dave Tippett and assitant coach Newell Brown of the Arizona Coyotes during the NHL game against the Edmonton Oilers at Gila River Arena on November 12, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
    Getty
    Leave a comment

    The Arizona Coyotes have signed assistant coach Newell Brown to a multi-year contract extension.

    “Newell is an excellent coach and has done a great job overseeing our power play,” said GM John Chayka in a release. “He has been a valuable addition to Dave Tippett’s coaching staff and we are all thrilled to have him back.”

    Brown joined the Coyotes in the summer of 2013, after three mostly successful years with the Vancouver Canucks on Alain Vigneault’s staff.

    The Coyotes also announced today that Steve Sullivan has been promoted to Director of Player Development and has signed a multi-year contract extension.

    Report: No buyout for Girardi, but Rangers willing to trade almost anyone

    FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2012, file photo, New York Rangers' Dan Girardi looks on during an NHL hockey game against the Philadelphia Flyers in Philadelphia. The Rangers say they have agreed to terms with Girardi on a multiyear contract extension, taking the key defenseman off the trading block and keeping him away from unrestricted free agency. The deal was announced Friday, Feb. 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
    AP
    5 Comments

    From Larry Brooks at the New York Post:

    The Post has learned the Blueshirts do not intend to buy out the remainder of Dan Girardi’s contract, which has four years remaining at an annual $5.5 million cap charge.

    In addition, sources report management has not requested the alternate captain to waive his no-move clause (which will be replaced by a modified no-trade following 2016-17). Further, no such request is expected.

    So Girardi will be back with the New York Rangers next season. That’s what Brooks is reporting.

    But that doesn’t mean there won’t be significant changes to the roster. According to Brooks, the Rangers are “prepared to listen to offers for everyone,” save for Henrik Lundqvist, Brady Skjei and Pavel Buchnevich.

    That includes Ryan McDonagh, Derek Stepan, Derick Brassard, Chris Kreider and Kevin Hayes, each player’s availability, of course, will be dependent upon the exchange rate in return. But nothing is off the table. And the Wild are believed to have serious interest in native Minnesotan Stepan.

    We told you it could be an interesting offseason in the Big Apple.

    Related: AV concedes the Rangers had a ‘puck-moving’ problem