Thomas Junta finishes prison term for involuntary manslaughter

Parents can spiral out of control when it comes to their kids. One of the most common situations where this happens is during sporting events, particularly in full-contact events that include some serious impact blows.

Yet as heated as these situations can become, you never expect someone to die during the worst exchanges. That’s exactly what happened in July 2000 when Thomas Junta fought with hockey coach Michael Costin. Costin lost his life while Junta was sentenced for six-to-10 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter, a charge for which he served time until Thursday. Here’s more from the Associated Press.

A Massachusetts man who beat another man to death at their sons’ hockey scrimmage has been released from prison.

Thomas Junta (JUN’-tah) of Reading received a six- to 10-year sentence in January 2002 for involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Costin. The case drew widespread attention to the problem of parental violence at youth sporting events.

A Massachusetts prisons spokeswoman says Junta was released Thursday from Northeastern Correctional Center in Concord.

It was a disturbing case, but Steve Krause of “The Item” writes that the story isn’t really about sports but rather the dangers of uncontrolled rage.

What is the difference between what Junta did and what happened two weeks ago at a Boston nightclub, where the participant in a bar brawl threw a heavy glass against the wall, impaling an innocent bystander in his jugular vein with a shard of glass and killing him? I say none.

In both cases, the root cause of the carnage is not necessarily the venue, but the rage … and the lack of control.

Junta’s story is certainly a cautionary tale about anger management, whether it be about sports or anything else. The difference between punching a hole in the wall/walking away from an argument/squeezing a stress ball vs. letting go and getting into a fight can be enormous. For Junta, it meant eight years in prison and a ruined reputation. For his victim Costin, it meant losing his life.

It’s easier said than done, but sometimes it’s better just to let it go.

Sharks send three to AHL; still waiting on Torres suspension

Nikolay Goldobin, Brent Burns
Leave a comment

The San Jose Sharks have assigned forwards Nikolay Goldobin and Melker Karlsson and defenseman Mirco Mueller to AHL San Jose.

Goldobin and Mueller are both first-round picks — the former in 2014, the latter in 2013.

Goldobin had one goal and two assists in five preseason games. It’s possible he could be called back up when the NHL suspends Raffi Torres.

Torres remains part of the 23-man roster (see below) but is facing a lengthy ban for his hit on Anaheim’s Jakub Silfverberg. Torres has a hearing today.

Rookie defenseman Dylan DeMelo is also on the roster. The 22-year-old had one goal and two assists in four preseason games.

Sharks roster

Glencross released from another PTO, this time by Avs

Washington Capitals v Ottawa Senators
1 Comment

Curtis Glencross’ hard-luck preseason continued on Monday, as the Avalanche announced they released him from his training camp tryout.

Glencross had previously been cut from Toronto’s camp, which he described as “kind of a shock” move. Following that release, the 32-year-old quickly shifted to Colorado but arrived fairly late in the overall process, and only got a bit of exposure before being let go.

While some thought yesterday’s trade of Freddie Hamilton to Calgary may have opened up a spot for Glencross, the Avs now appear to be going in a different direction.

A two-time 20-goal scorer that netted 13 in 71 games last year, it’s unclear what lies ahead for Glencross.