NHL teams look to restrict blogger access in certain locker room situations

This is an issue that might only be relevant to a small segment of readers out there (likely the ones who have their own blogs), but it’s been the talk of the Virtual Hockey Town this morning so I thought it would be prudent to pass along the story.

Puck Daddy’s Greg Wyshynski discussed the fact that the NHL might change its policies when it comes to the kind of locker room access bloggers receive. Here is an excerpt from that in-depth piece.

Credentialed bloggers usually enjoy the same access as a newspaper or radio reporter on a game night: a seat in the press box, fresh popcorn and access to the teams’ dressing rooms for postgame interviews. They cover the game, pass information to their audience, and have done so for the last several years without many incidents of unprofessional behavior, despite approaching the coverage from a fan’s perspective.

Yet several prominent NHL franchises, including the New York Rangers and Edmonton Oilers, have strict “no blogger” policies in their arenas. They don’t see them as working journalists, and they certainly don’t see a need for them to have access to cramped locker rooms after the game.

On Monday, these teams emphatically voiced those concerns during an annual preseason conference call between NHL executives and team media-relations directors. Their issue: If my team doesn’t credential bloggers in its home arena, why should bloggers haves access to my team’s locker room on the road?

In essence, these teams wish to see bloggers become a second-class citizenry in the press box: Given a ‘B-grade’ credential that allows them on press row and in the home-team dressing room, but prohibits them from interacting with players from the visiting team if that team has a policy against alt-media access.

Again, I know for most of you, this issue comes down to “pulling back the curtain” or navel gazing. Feel free to scroll down from this article if means nothing to you.

Moving on, earning credentials – and thus dealing with NHL teams – has been a big issue for hockey bloggers as they’ve grown in prominence over the last few years.

On one hand, many teams might be justified in giving a prominent blogger access because of the increase in publicity that could come with it. This is especially justified with teams who lack a palpable buzz (like the New York Islanders and their “Blog Box” concept) or a standard major newspaper beat writer. One of the reasons hockey blogs are successful is because they fill a need that isn’t being met thanks to struggling print operations.

That being said, NHL teams cannot be totally guilty when they give a pause. As Wyshysnki wrote, it’s true that the “no accountability” talk is going by the wayside as big blogs are being tied to corporate entities more and more, but there certainly is more mystery with bloggers. After all, with a beat reporter, you can call upon his or her editor to bring the hammer down. Blogs often range in professional aims so wildly that it’s often difficult to identify the chain of command.

(Not to mention the fact that many bloggers bring a sardonic, satirical approach to hockey that understandably makes some teams nervous.)

There isn’t really a “one size fits all” answer to this issue, which is why the NHL allowed case-by-case decisions of access. It’s a shame that some NHL teams are so adamant when it comes to restricting bloggers, but ultimately its their right to choose who can and cannot gain access to their players and other employees.

Still, blogs aren’t going to disappear even if their access is restricted, especially since “blog” is such a vague term that could describe any number of endeavors. Naturally, I’m in favor of bloggers gaining as much access as possible, but that doesn’t mean I think the league is crazy for being reluctant to allow more than their comfortable with. It will take time for bloggers to become a part of the “mainstream” and I, for one, think that isn’t strictly a bad thing.

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    After ‘a tough recovery and a long road,’ Tyler Myers is feeling healthy again

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    The 2016-17 season wasn’t an easy one for Jets defenseman Tyler Myers.

    The 27-year-old was limited to just 11 games because of a nagging groin injury that just didn’t want to go away. It was the first time in his NHL career that he was forced to sit out that long.

    The good news, is that he appears to be fully healthy heading into this season.

    “It was a tough recovery and a long road, but we got through it. I’m feeling good now and it’s exciting for me to be back on the ice with the guys,” said Myers, per the Winnipeg Sun. “You just have to put last year behind you and I don’t feel like it’s going to take too long to get back into the swing of things.”

    On top of going through his own physical ailments, the Myers family was dealt another blow when their son, Tristan, was born five weeks prematurely and suffered a stroke.

    Thankfully, Tristan’s now doing well, according to his father, and things are looking up for the entire family.

    “There were so many things going on last year. I was getting treatment and then the personal stuff came up. It was a very strange year, but it was never in my mind that I wasn’t going to get back. I always knew I’d get back to this point. It just took a little bit longer, given what was going on.”

    The Jets didn’t make the playoffs last season, but they have one of the deepest blue lines in the league heading into this season.

    Myers is part of a group that includes Dustin Byfulgien, Toby Enstrom, Jacob Trouba, Josh Morrissey and Dmitry Kulikov, who signed with Winnipeg in free agency.

    If the Jets miss the postseason again, it won’t be because of their blue line.

    Getting back to Myers, it sounds like he’ll be making his preseason debut tonight against the Oilers:

    A hand injury will force Alex Steen to miss the rest of training camp

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    Here’s some more bad news if you’re a fan of the St. Louis Blues.

    On Wednesday morning, the team announced that veteran forward Alex Steen will miss the rest of training camp because of a left hand injury.

    The 33-year-old suffered the injury during last night’s 5-3 preseason loss to the Dallas Stars. Steen will be re-evaluated in three weeks time, according to the release sent out by the team.

    The veteran forward has been hit hard by injuries throughout his career. He hasn’t played more than 80 games since the 2008-09 season. Last year, he missed only six games, but he’s been out for 43 contests over the last four seasons.

    The Blues open the season in Pittsburgh on Oct. 4.

    It’s been a rough training camp for the Blues so far, as they’ve already lost forward Zach Sanford (shoulder surgery) for 5-6 months and defenseman Jay Bouwmeester (fractured ankle) is also expected to be re-evaluated in three weeks.

    Video: Patrick Marleau scored a beauty in his Leafs debut

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    It didn’t take Patrick Marleau long to score a goal for the Toronto Maple Leafs. Yea, it’s the preseason, but it’s still nice to see him adapt to his new surroundings.

    Going into Tuesday’s game, the veteran admitted that a new beginning in a new city was exciting, but he didn’t seem stressed by it.

    “I wouldn’t say nervous, but definitely some excitement,” Marleau told TSN.ca before the game.

    “There’s that energy of something new … you’re not sure how everything’s going to go so you try to stay within yourself.”

    He did a pretty good job staying within himself.

    With the Leafs trailing 1-0 in the first period of their game against the Ottawa Senators, Marleau entered the Sens zone on the right side and roofed a wrist shot past Mike Condon.

     

    “He scored a goal,” Leafs head coach Mike Babcock said, per Sportsnet. “He made a real nice play – he backchecked all the way, he slowed the guy down, he gave our D time, he pushed the pace, he wired it under the bar – I mean Patty was fine.”

    Hockey world supports Brian Boyle in his battle against cancer

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    On Tuesday, Brian Boyle announced that he had been diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    As scary as the news must have been for him to hear, Boyle showed the hockey world that he’s going to have a positive outlook on this situation.

    “I feel very fortunate and very blessed,” Boyle said, per NHL.com. “We’ve had a tremendous outpouring of prayers, and if there’s anything I can ask it’s that that continues. That is something that I’ve seen firsthand heal cancers and heal situations that are said to be untreatable. For us, we’re in a good spot. We think we have a good plan of attack here and I’m looking forward to getting on the ice and playing.

    Immediately, players, teams and fans began sending him messages of support. It’s incredible to see what the hockey community can do when it comes together.

    Boyle has already stated that he plans on being in the Devils lineup on opening night.