Panthers GM Dale Tallon sees a lot of the Blackhawks in his current team

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daletallon1.jpgEven though Dale Tallon wasn’t there to enjoy it, last season’s Blackhawks championship had his finger prints all over it. He was the guy who signed or drafted a great number of the players that helped the Blackhawks end their 49-year Stanley Cup drought and now he finds himself in Florida as GM of the Panthers thinking that there are similarities between the Blackhawks and Panthers when it comes to building from seemingly nothing. Dan Rosen of gets the story from the guy who’s looking to turn around the team in Sunrise.

Tallon, who built the Blackhawks into Stanley Cup champions, has spent the first three months of his new job assessing the situation in Florida and “slowly but surely chipping away at the block.”

“We probably had a few more assets to start with here (Florida) than we had there (Chicago), but it’s a challenge and I’m looking forward to it,” Tallon told from the 2010 NHL Research, Development and Orientation Camp Fueled By G Series.

What has Tallon done with the Panthers so far? He’s turned them from the butt of jokes on the ice and a source of irrelevancy in South Florida to a team that’s at least got some buzz surrounding them. Being the architect of a Stanley Cup winning team can help make that happen. By adding guys like Chris Higgins, Marty Reasoner, Nathan Paetsch, Mike Weaver, and Andrew Peters he’s making the Panthers a tougher team as well as a more economically sound one. There are good players there now with David Booth and Stephen Weiss, but that’s a far cry from being a loaded team. As for what he has done, Tallon states the company line.

“We added the pieces we needed to add to make ourselves better,” Tallon
said. “We added more depth at all positions, and we did it in a fiscally
responsible way.”

Where Tallon’s abilities will be tested the most, however, is improving the Panthers farm system which is virtually bone dry. Drafting Erik Gudbranson third overall this year was a good start towards making things better. With the moves the Panthers have made to build depth on defense this year, they’ve made it OK for them to be able to send Gudbranson back to juniors just in case he isn’t ready right away out of training camp. Gudbranson also might help remind people of another big, tough defenseman from Tallon’s days in Chicago – a guy named Duncan Keith.

For now though, the Panthers are likely to be a bit too similar to Tallon’s first few teams in Chicago that struggled mightily and accumulated high draft picks much to their benefit. After all, guys like Jonathan Toews and Patrick Kane don’t just grow on trees. While the Panthers might not be as bad as those Hawks teams (65 points in 2005-2006 and 71 points in 2006-2007), the future of the team is at least in seemingly good hands with Tallon in charge now rather than the wandering aimlessly version of the team we’ve seen for the better part of the last 10 years.

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild

Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.