Forbes report: Dallas Stars close to being sold for $275-$300 million

dallas_stars.gifThe saga surrounding the sale of the Dallas Stars may finally be coming to an end. Mike Ozanian of Forbes Magazine is reporting that the team is on the brink of being sold for an amount in the range of $275-$300 million. He goes on to add this tidbit:

The sale of the Stars  tells me two things: creditors of Hicks Sports Group will recoup some $200 million on top of what they will receive from the sale of the Texas Rangers and that despite the troubles of the Phoenix Coyotes, Atlanta Thrashers and Nashville Predators hockey can sell in the right southern market. Even the lower enterprise value for the Stars works out to  a rich 2.8 times revenue and 23 times operating income. Those are NBA-like multiples.

Considering that Hicks was able to recently get rid of the Texas Rangers in a messy litigation wrestling match that involved Nolan Ryan (who along with Chuck Greenberg ultimately bought the team for $590 million), Tom Hicks’ escape from the burden of professional sports is nearly complete. Liverpool soccer fans will be disheartened to know he’s still involved with them.

Ozanian fails to note, however, that hockey in Dallas is an enterprise unto itself and one that’s vastly different than the issues in Phoenix, Atlanta or Nashville. In Dallas, hockey has been a roaring success. Attendance is never an issue, the team has generally always been successful there and it’s grown the game in Texas by leaps and bounds. After all, do you think the AHL would have three franchises there without it going over well with the locals? I think not. The Stars are without a doubt a successful NHL franchise and their location in Texas just shows that if you bring a winner to town it can do well.

With Hicks out of the picture, whether the new owner is Bill Gallacher or Tom Gaglardi remains to be seen, but so long as they’re in place, you have to think that the shackles will come off of the finances of the Stars. This summer has seen the Stars rein things in a bit in regards to spending money, leading to trade rumors involving Mike Ribeiro being shipped out so the team could lose his contract. The Stars, as it sits now, have the sixth lowest payroll in the NHL. That may jump up a bit once they sign restricted free agents Niklas Grossman and James Neal. Getting Hicks’ toxic-of-late presence out of Dallas and the NHL should do both a world of good.

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    WATCH LIVE: Anaheim Ducks at Nashville Predators – Game 6

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    Will we see a Game 7 in the Western Conference Final or will the Nashville Predators stamp their ticket to the franchise’s first-ever Stanley Cup Final?

    We’ll find out soon enough on Monday, as the Predators host the Anaheim Ducks in Game 6.

    Ryan Getzlaf and the Ducks will get their chance to beat the Ryan Johansen-less Predators once again on NBCSN. You can watch online and via the NBC Sports App.

    Here’s what you need to know:

    Anaheim Ducks vs. Nashville Predators (Preds lead 3-2)

    Time: 8:00 p.m. ET

    Network: NBCSN (Stream live here)

    Check out the highlights from Nashville’s 3-1 win in Game 5

    Related:

    Ducks will be without Eaves and Rakell in Game 6

    Pontus Aberg ‘face planted’ before scoring game-winning goal in Game 6

    Report: Sharks sign Czech d-man Simek

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    San Jose’s had good success scouting European leagues in recent years, and the club is hopeful that trend continued on Monday.

    The Sharks have signed d-man Radim Simek out of the Czech League, per NBC Sports California. It’s a one-year, two-way pact for the 24-year-old, who just finished representing his native Czech Republic at the World Hockey Championship.

    Simek had two points in eight games for the Czechs.

    According to a report out of Radio Praha, the Sharks beat out the Rangers to acquire Simek. Passed over in his draft year, Simek has spent his entire pro career with Liberec Bili Tygri.

    As mentioned above, Sharks GM Doug Wilson has done well finding European skaters in their early-to-mid-20s, ones that contribute right away at the NHL level: Melker Karlsson, Joonas Donskoi and Marcus Sorensen, most specifically.

    Smith could re-up with Rangers, agent expects Gorton meeting soon

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    Earlier this month, we wrote about how pending UFA d-man Brendan Smith impressed his Rangers teammates with his strong postseason play.

    It was clear the Rangers wanted to keep Smith, a trade deadline pickup, in the fold. And now it sounds like the interest is mutual.

    “He’s more than open to coming back,” agent Anton Thun told the New York Post. ““I’m sure I’ll be speaking to Jeff [Gorton, Rangers GM] in the next week or so and we’ll see if we can work something out.”

    Smith, 28, just wrapped a two-year, $5.5 million deal with a $2.75M average annual cap hit. His stock certainly rose following the move from Detroit to New York, thanks in large part to a playoff in which he had four points through 12 games, and averaged just under 20 minutes per night.

    Add it all up, and a raise is in the cards.

    Helping Smith’s cause is a relatively weak crop of free-agent defensemen this summer. Kevin Shattenkirk will be the top dog, while the second tier includes under-30s like Smith, Karl Alzner and Michael Stone.

    The Post estimated a $4M AAV could be on the horizon for Smith, which makes sense. Thun didn’t talk specific numbers, but did suggest the Rangers weren’t going to get any sort of discount.

    “To pass up free agency,” he explained, “Brendan’s going to need a contract that reflects market value.”

     

     

    Penguins redefining defense by committee

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    When the Pittsburgh Penguins lost defenseman Kris Letang for the entire postseason it was thought be a crushing blow to their chances to repeat as Stanley Cup champions. Especially with a path that was likely to include two of the NHL’s best teams in the first two rounds of the playoffs.

    Not only is Letang one of the best defensemen in the world, he is one of the most important cogs in the Penguins’ machine. During last year’s Stanley Cup run he played close to 29 minutes per game and did so at an incredibly high level. Losing that sort of workhorse is nearly impossible to replace.

    But even with Letang’s absence (and even additional injuries to defensemen Trevor Daley and Justin Schultz) the Penguins find themselves one win away from returning to the Stanley Cup Final without really having a true No. 1 defenseman to turn to.

    This is almost unheard of in today’s NHL.

    Every team that goes on a deep run in the playoffs has a minute-eating defenseman that can be counted on to play a significant portion of the game. Letang. Drew Doughty. Duncan Keith. Erik Karlsson. Zdeno Chara. Players like that.

    When it comes to the playoffs, teams tend to roll with their top-four defensemen the most and do their best to hide or shelter their third pairing by limiting their minutes as much as they can. The Penguins have not had that luxury without Letang.

    That means everybody has had to step up and take on an expanded role. Just about everybody is playing more than they are used to while there is virtually no difference between each role.

    First, consider that every team (22 of them) that has reached the Stanley Cup Final since the 2005-06 season has had at least one defensemen average more than 22 minutes of ice-time per game. Twenty-one of those 22 teams have had at least two players log more than 22 minutes, while 18 of them have had at least one player average more than 25 minutes of ice-time per game.

    The 2016-17 Penguins currently have none.

    Brian Dumoulin is currently their ice-time leader, playing just over 21 minutes per game.

    Let’s take a look at what that looks like from a usage perspective.

    The table here looks at this year’s Penguins, the remaining final four teams this season, and every Stanley Cup Finalist dating back to 2011-12 and what percentage of a 60-minute game each of their top-six defensemen played on an average night. This year’s Penguins should stick out as a massive outlier.

     

    Other than the 2014-15 Lightning and 2011-12 Devils every other team on here had a No. 1 defenseman that was on the ice for more than 40 percent of the game on a given night. And the Lightning and Devils were very close to it.

    All of them had a No. 2 defenseman that played more than 36 percent of the game on a given night.

    Again, the Penguins currently have nobody taking on that sort of a workload in either spot.

    Every team on there was able to limit their playing time of their third pairing (some more than others) while there was a significant gap between the ice-time for their No. 1 and No. 6 defenseman.

    For Pittsburgh, their third pairing plays almost as much as their second pairing, while there is minimal difference between the workload for their top pairing and their third pairing. Last year, as an example, Letang averaged more than 13 additional minutes per game than their No. 6 defenseman.

    This year Dumoulin is only averaging three more minutes than their No. 6.

    It really is a defense by committee approach and it has been kind of fascinating to watch.

    They are clearly lacking the elite puck-moving presence that a player like Letang can provide, and at times their ability to smoothly and efficiently exit the defensive zone has been a struggle.

    It is also a situation where a lot of players are being thrust into roles they are not used to playing.  This has at times led to extended zone time for their opponents and put them in a situation where they are giving up way more shots per game than they want. They are also fortunate to have two outstanding goalies in Matt Murray and Marc-Andre Fleury that have been fantastic this postseason to keep pucks out of the net. But overall it is a unit that has seemingly taken on a whatever it takes approach to get the job done.

    It runs counter to everything we have seen from contending teams in recent years when it comes to the makeup of a defense, but they have somehow found a way to make this patchwork unit work. Now here they are, just one win away from getting back to the Stanley Cup Final.