Looking back at the California Golden Seals and their wacky owner Charlie Finley

In sports – just like many areas of life – history seems to repeat itself but trailblazers often stand out. Often times, it’s great ideas but every now and then it’s just off-the-wall stuff that stands out in our memories.

It seems like the 60s and 70s were an especially wheels-off time in sports history, as competitive leagues in football (the AFL), basketball (the ABA) and hockey (the WHA) challenged the salary structures and conventions of their sports. Yet one of the strangest professional sports teams operated in the mostly straight-laced NHL: the Oakland/California Golden Seals never really make waves on the ice … except when it came to what they wore during games.

Oakland A’s owner Charlie Finley was an eccentric man who “didn’t know a right wing from a left wing” and it showed when he demanded that the team wear white skates as part of their uniforms (one would assume as a nod to Finley’s baseball franchise). NJ.com’s Rich Chere shares some recollections from former Seals GM (and eventual Islanders team builder) Bill Torrey on the odd fashion choices.

“I told him, ‘Charlie, this isn’t the Ice Capades. On white ice they’re going to look like crap,’ ” Torrey recalls. “Fred Glover was our coach, an old-time guy, and when I showed him the skates he said, ‘(Forget it) if you think any of our guys are wearing those.’


Torrey was certain that when Finley saw how bad the white skates looked, he’d get rid of them. So the GM addressed his players before the game.

“I said, ‘Gentlemen, the man who signs your paychecks is here,” Torrey said. “Here is a pair of white skates. He wants to see what they look like on a player in a game. Anybody want to volunteer?’

“Everybody dropped their heads. Nobody wanted to wear them. I turned and walked out, not sure if anybody would wear them. But Gary Jarrett put them on and wore them. And they looked like crap.

“Charlie said, ‘Bill, you’re right. They look like crap. But I’m going to get some green skates with gold toes. We never wore the white skates long. Trainers hated them because the black puck would hit them and they’d look terrible.’ But we went with the green skates with gold toes.”

The team’s official colors were Kelly green, California gold and snow white.

Considering the off-the-deep end, mad semi-genius of Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, you have to wonder if Finley is just another odd rich man who flocked to high-profile ownership in California. You cannot help but wonder if the Finleys of the world explain why the NHL has been reluctant to accept Jim Balsillie, Mark Cuban and other outspoken types as owners.

Something tells me Cuban would have some better fashion instincts, though.

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    Wild lose Scandella to lower-body injury

    ST PAUL, MN - OCTOBER 15: Marco Scandella #6 of the Minnesota Wild skates after the puck against Winnipeg Jets during the game on October 15, 2016 at Xcel Energy Center in St Paul, Minnesota. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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    Ryan Suter may be in for a long night, at least if the first period of the Minnesota Wild – Buffalo Sabres game is any indication.

    Suter logged 11 minutes of ice time in that opening frame after fellow defenseman Marco Scandella suffered a lower-body injury. The Wild aren’t certain if he’ll be able to come back in the game.

    Onlookers believe that Scandella got hurt while he was tangled up with Nicolas Deslauriers of the Sabres.

    Scandella is averaging a little under 20 minutes per game so far this season, so the Wild have to hope that this is just a minor issue.

    Welcome Lindholm: Ducks send Theodore, Etem to AHL

    LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 28:  Shea Theodore #53 of the Anaheim Ducks skates during a preseason game against the Los Angeles Kings at Staples Center on September 28, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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    The Anaheim Ducks finally hammered out a (sweet) deal with Hampus Lindholm, so now it comes down to some housekeeping.

    Specifically, it means sending some fairly useful players with significant pedigrees down to the AHL on Thursday. The team announced that both Shea Theodore and Emerson Etem are bound for the San Diego Gulls.

    Theodore, the 26th pick back in 2013, contributed a pretty assist to the Ducks’ 6-1 shellacking of the Nashville Predators last night:

    It’s a cool story that Etem returned to the franchise that selected him 29th overall in 2010, yet he’s struggled to really find a niche in the NHL so far. At 24, there’s still time, though he likely feels a little anxious to become a full-time guy at the top level.

    TSN’s Pierre LeBrun notes that Shea Theodore is likely to be on LTIR for “the foreseeable future,” which means that the Ducks aren’t forced to move Cam Fowler.

    That’s great news for the Ducks. For Theodore in particular? The situation is not so great.

    Red Wings will likely be without red-hot Vanek tonight

    TAMPA, FL - OCTOBER 13:  Thomas Vanek #62 of the Detroit Red Wings gets ready for a face-off against Tampa Bay Lightning during a game at the Amalie Arena on October 13, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)
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    With a whopping 30.8 shooting percentage, a lot of things have gone Thomas Vanek‘s way since he joined the Detroit Red Wings. Thursday bucks that trend.

    Puck luck isn’t what went away for Vanek; instead, he’s gotten a bad break with a lower-body injury that is expected to sideline him during tonight’s game against the St. Louis Blues.

    The Detroit Free Press’ Helene St. James pegs it as possibly being a groin injury or hip flexor. The Detroit News’ Ted Kulfan leaves more toward it being a groin issue.

    With eight points during his first seven games with Detroit, Vanek’s been a revelation, but that redemption story is now paused. It sounds like Justin Abdelkader will return to the lineup for the Red Wings, so maybe it isn’t all bad news for Detroit.

    The Red Wings confirmed that he would be out later on in the evening.

    Alzner: Capitals’ playoff letdown is ‘deep somewhere in our heads’

    PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 10:  Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins shakes hands with Matt Niskanen #2 of the Washington Capitals after the Penguins defeated the Capitals 4-3 in overtime in Game Six of the Eastern Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Consol Energy Center on May 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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    The mood is a “little sour” in the Washington Capitals locker room right now, and the discomfort goes deeper than losing back-to-back games for the first time in more than a year.

    With it being early in 2016-17, maybe the Capitals aren’t totally over falling to the Pittsburgh Penguins after a resounding run to the Presidents’ Trophy.

    “Last year, we were just so hungry all over the ice, and that’s why we had so much success. We just haven’t been as hungry right now,” Karl Alzner said, according to the Washington Post. “I don’t know if it’s because deep somewhere in our heads, we did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us, so maybe it’s just taking some time to build back up and as the season goes on, we get better. I don’t feel that in the front of my head, but maybe deep in the back, that’s kind of what’s going on. We’re better than how we’ve been playing.”

    Credit Alzner for his candor, because that’s a remarkable admission of vulnerability.

    Buying in

    Not every member of the Capitals look at a few bumps in the road as a bad thing. Braden Holtby told the Washington Post that “a little bit of adversity never hurts to build a team,” and considering the rigors of an 82-game season, he’s likely correct.

    As CSN Mid Atlantic notes, Barry Trotz understands the peaks and valleys of a lengthy campaign … but he still expects his players to buy-in.

    “We’ve got the right elements to do what we can do. But there has to be a level of everybody [being] all in. You can’t be half in,” Trotz said. ” … You can’t let your foot off the gas in this league or you find yourself in a hole sometimes.”

    Climbing that mountain once again

    One can relate to the Capitals’ troubles in a way.

    A negative type might feel a bit like Sisyphus here, wondering if it’s worth it to roll that boulder up a hill all over again after that playoff loss pushed them down. “We did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us,” as Alzner said.

    Maybe the Capitals are over-thinking this a bit.

    They have a few days off to ruminate on things, but the compressed three-game road trip coming up might be valuable in demanding all of their thoughts.

    It’s tougher to find time for an existential crisis when you face three away contests in Western Canada during just four days. From the sound of things, it might be the perfect type of challenge for this group.