NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly discusses the NHL's 'line in the sand' regarding contracts

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Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Bill Daly.jpgBy now you may be well-versed in the reasoning behind the rejection of Ilya Kovalchuk’s 17-year, $102 million contract with the New Jersey Devils. To review, his deal stuck out as especially bad considering that his deal had six unrealistic salaried years at the end, the deal would take him to age 43 and those final seasons also mysteriously shifted from no-movement clause years to no-trade clause only seasons.

That being said, the NHL’s “line in the sand” seems to be hidden underneath a sand castle somewhere on a metaphorical beach of confusing puck-based legislation. (To complete this zany metaphor, the league’s rules regarding head-shot suspensions are being devoured by sharks.)

SBN’s Devils blogger John Fischer got in touch with NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly, widely considered to be the second most powerful league executive behind Gary Bettman. Fischer asked for clarification regarding what exactly determines that “line in the sand.” Read the full article for some context and the full conversation, but here are a few selected bits.

John Fischer: I’ve read and understand the reasoning of Richard Bloch’s ruling that sustained the NHL’s rejection of the New Jersey Devils’ contract with Ilya Kovalchuk. However, between the ruling (p.15-16 in particular) and the broad view of Article 26.3, it is ambiguous as to what the “line in the sand” is now for future SPCs. What would cause a contract to be unacceptable in the league’s view going forward?

I know it was reported two days ago that the league has no issue with Vincent Lecavalier’s contract; so the “line” could be somewhere in between the parameters of both SPCs. However, I’d like your or the league’s opinion on this issue.

Bill Daly: While we do look (and have looked) at each contract individually, your suggested approach is the right one. There are a number of “guideposts” already out there from which Clubs can guide their conduct. No one factor is determinative, but all are important. How long is the contract, what is the player’s age at the time of the contract’s “expiration”, what is the value of the contract in its “back-end” and how does that compare to its “front-end” and its resulting AAV, what are the other relevant structural elements of the contract? All are relevant questions. And while this may sound subjective and ambiguous, its really not that much so. The Clubs are all very familiar with these considerations and know where we draw the line.

[snip]

At this point I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that we may further discuss with the Union to see if “bright lines” can be established. Absent those “bright lines,” it will be on a case-by-case, with existing guideposts established, the GMs understanding our concerns and sensitivities, and always with the ability of the Clubs to reach out to us to dicuss [sic].

My take is that Daly means “guidelines” or “boundaries” when he uses the phrase “bright lines.” (Or maybe he likes using highlighters.)

While Bettman’s right hand man didn’t get too specific, his answers do illuminate the fact that the NHL’s 30 teams aren’t in the dark about the league’s policies. That being said, it would certainly be interesting if the league was a little more transparent regarding their rules, regulations and decision making processes.

Stars end Capitals’ winning streak, pass Blackhawks for West lead

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For two periods, the Dallas Stars seemed to say, “Are you sure the Washington Capitals are the best team in the NHL?”

They chased Braden Holtby and built a 4-0 lead through those first 40 minutes, and that was enough … but barely. The Stars beat the Capitals 4-3 on Saturday, which accomplished the following:

  • Dallas ended Washington’s winning streak at five games. The Stars have now won three straight.
  • This win slides the Stars ahead of the Chicago Blackhawks for first place in the highly competitive Central Division. While both teams sit at 77 standings points, Dallas holds three games in hand.
  • By passing Chicago, the Stars now lead the Western Conference as a whole.

Impressive stuff. Some might even call it a statement game, although others may hold that nail-biting ending against them (possibly arguing that the Stars’ flaws may come back to haunt them in the playoffs).

Dallas’ biggest concern likely has little to do with doubters. Instead, they must monitor the statuses of forwards Tyler Seguin and Cody Eakin.

Long story short, the Stars are red-hot, yet bigger challenges likely lie ahead.

Blackhawks fall to Ducks in OT, lose Hossa to injury

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The Chicago Blackhawks are on edge on Saturday, and it’s not because of what’s currently a close game against the Anaheim Ducks.

(Not that they’re indifferent toward a match against their opponents from last year’s conference final match, mind you.)

Instead, the Blackhawks are quite concerned about the health of Marian Hossa, who needed help off of the ice following an awkward, scary-looking crash into the boards. (Hampus Lindholm delivered the hip check that sent Hossa sprawling, in case you’re wondering.)

You can see that moment in the video above, while My Regular Face’s GIF also captures that troubling moment:

It’s too early to tell if Hossa will bounce back or miss some time from this. Stay tuned for potential updates.

Update: Joel Quenneville seems optimistic about Hossa, broadly speaking:

Ryan Getzlaf scored the overtime game-winner as the Ducks won 3-2 (OT).

Understatement: Saturday was a rough night for Panthers

Nashville Predators center Colin Wilson (33) checks Florida Panthers center Jonathan Huberdeau (11) during the second period of an NHL hockey game, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Sunrise, Fla. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
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If it weren’t for Mike Yeo and the Minnesota Wild, you could argue that the Florida Panthers suffered from the worst night so far.

You can see that Saturday was unpleasant merely from looking at the scoreboard: the Nashville Predators pummeled the Panthers by an unkind score of 5-0.

The pain goes beyond that … literally so.

For one thing, Quinton Howden suffered an upper-body injury and did not return. That’s no good, but if you want to feel sick to your stomach, footage of Brandon Pirri‘s likely lower-body injury (ankle maybe?) may do the trick.

(Seriously, you may be happier if you don’t look.)

The Panthers didn’t make an announcement about Pirri one way or another, so we’ll see if he somehow avoided anything significant.

Either way, it was a night this team would like to forget.

Fractured jaw from fight sidelines Chris Stewart for 4-8 weeks

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It’s unlikely that Chris Stewart will generate another 30-goal season in the NHL, but he still might be missed by the Anaheim Ducks.

The team announced that the ornery forward is expected to miss four-to-eight weeks with a fractured jaw. If that’s the recovery window, Stewart may go into the playoffs a little rusty (if he can get in any regular season games at all).

The Ducks didn’t elaborate, but the Columbus Dispatch’s Aaron Portzline believes that the injury happened during a fight with Dalton Prout of the Columbus Blue Jackets. You can see that brawl in the video above.

One bright side for Anaheim: if they believe that they need to replace what Stewart brings to the table (rugged play with a dash of offense), then at least this injury happened before the the Feb. 29 trade deadline.