2010 NHL Free Agency: What about … Patrick O'Sullivan?

Thumbnail image for osullivan.jpgAt this point in free agency, the focus shifts from the gems to flawed guys who can still bring some skill to the table. So, going forward, we’ll spotlight individual players who are flying under the radar.

Previous Entries: Slava Kozlov, Alex Frolov, Willie Mitchell, Lee Stempniak, Maxim Afinogenov

Today’s entry: Patrick O’Sullivan

Name: Patrick O’Sullivan
Height: 5-11 Weight: 190
Position: C
Strengths: Fairly versatile, not afraid to shoot, decent goal scorer
Weaknesses: Consistency, play without the puck, attitude, defensive indifference, size

Most of the people I’ve spotlighted in this feature are either approaching their 30’s are already there. After all, this is the period in NHL free agency in which general managers are more or less trying to decide if a dented but discounted can of green beans will go bad before they make dinner that night.

O’Sullivan is in some cases that dented can. He’s far from defensively adept, even if that cool looking photo up above might give that impression. While I’m not a huge proponent of the stat, it’s still telling that he had a minus rating in every season of his four year NHL career, including a horrific -35 last season and an ugly -55 overall. You won’t find him winning more battles than most (and not just because he’s small). There has been some talk that he might not be the best locker room guy, either.

Still, at 25, it’s surprising that some GM or coach hasn’t fallen into that “I can change him” trap at this point.

osullivanbeatsturco.jpgHe seems to have some skill, for one thing. You can understand why his agent’s phone isn’t ringing off the hook – his last two season totals for goals were 11 and 16 – but he’s already hit the 22-goal mark once in his career.

The way I see it, his agent should convince him to take a cheapo one-year contract with a contender and hypnotize him into being a team player. He might not ever challenge for the Selke, but if you put him in the right situation, he could be a good “bang for the buck” guy.

Take the Pittsburgh Penguins, for example. If GM Ray Shero thinks that their tight knit locker room would keep him in line, O’Sullivan could be a nice low-budget option along the lines of Petr Sykora. The one thing that stands out about O’Sullivan is that – while he doesn’t connect often – he’s not afraid to take shots. His 191 SOG was solid for 73 games last season, but in full years he shot an above-average 200, 259 and 220 times. Whether they line him up with Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin, he could be a good fit as an OK finisher running shotgun with a primer passer.

Would he be the perfect guy for the Penguins or anyone else? Absolutely not, but most teams waved goodbye to “perfect” long ago. He comes with some risks, but at the right price, I must ask … what about Patrick O’Sullivan?

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

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Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told ESPN.com that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.